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Thread: Best Kitchen Faucet

  1. #1
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    Default Best Kitchen Faucet

    I know that is a loaded question. e have a home in an area with really bad water. It eats plumbing fixtures. When we moved in 13 years ago I installed a Delta faucet. Single handle pull out. I should have known better as I have never had good luck with Delta. The water attacked the entire assembly as it was not stainless. I was in Lowes one day and they were clearing out some simple 2 handle Lowes brand faucets. I bought one and it worked well for 3 years. Now the faucet spray leaks and the faucet itself leaks. No big deal as I paid almost nothing. You get what you paid for! I would like to replace it with a better quality. I still like 2 handle faucets but would go with a single handle if it would give me longer service. I also want one that is easy to repair. No special tools to replace a cartridge. In my mind Moen is the best. Is that correct? What about American Standard or Pfitzer? Any advice appreciated

  2. #2
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    The Lifetime warranty on the Moen is hard to beat.

    That is if they are around to back it.

    From what I have seen, they all are built cheap now a days.


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  3. #3

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    I will say that the Moen stuff from the supply house is better than the stuff from the big box store. I recently installed a "banbury" kitchen faucet that was supplied to me by the homeowner that came from the big box store, and the entire faucet body was plastic. Also installed a Lav that came with a plastic pop-up drain assembly ( which went right in the trash). Supply house models come with a solid brass pop-up. Cost more though...

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    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm66208 View Post
    I will say that the Moen stuff from the supply house is better than the stuff from the big box store. I recently installed a "banbury" kitchen faucet that was supplied to me by the homeowner that came from the big box store, and the entire faucet body was plastic. Also installed a Lav that came with a plastic pop-up drain assembly ( which went right in the trash). Supply house models come with a solid brass pop-up. Cost more though...

    Very True.

    Watch out for the words "stainless finish".

    It is plastic with a stainless looking finish. From what I have seen.


    The true model number helps to see what you are really buying.
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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The "no lead" laws are forcing the companies to use more and more plastic. Moen kitchen faucets are NOT on my 'preferred fixture" list.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    DIY Member Soapm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    The "no lead" laws are forcing the companies to use more and more plastic. Moen kitchen faucets are NOT on my 'preferred fixture" list.
    Is that bad? The "no lead" laws? I thought they were good since lead turned out to be nasty stuff... You sure don't want to drink it.

    And consumers shopping by price is why we see cheap plastic goods. The founding fathers had the right idea when they raised import taxes to offset for the motherlands established industrial base. It would cause short term inflation and Wally world would have to change it's inventory but that's the only way quality made American products could compete in this cheap "Made in China" or in sweat shop economy. And the jobs it would bring back as we crank up American manufacturing....

    Don't get me started but cheap plastic goods has nothing to do with lead and everything to do with our cheap, disposable mindset. Now days it's cheaper to buy a new one than to fix the one you have. That shows how cheap the goods we consume really are. I haven't seen a TV repair shop in years, because now you just get a new one, "Made in China"...

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    DIY Senior Member houptee's Avatar
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    Anyone have good or bad advice on Hansgrohe faucets? They are a bit pricey but do they hold up better and longer?
    I have had the same basic experiences with Moen, Delta, and Pfister, they all seem to need cartridges after a few years and they start to leak at the handle top caps.

  8. #8

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    My experience has been that there is good and bad with all brands. Even with the more expensive stuff, sure, they seem better built, but they still wear & need service. I like the SS flex hose and the spring return on the Hansgrohe faucet better than the cheap Moen nylon braided hose with a counter weight return system, but have repaired/replaced both. I have a Jacklo (I believe) lav out there that was $$$ and it eats cartridges, and a $$$$ Restoration hardware lav that is squeely on the hot side that I cant get resolved. I've got a 5 year old $33 peerless faucet in my office that gets heavy use and it has been flawless... Your mileage may vary...

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    My personal experience is limited. I put a new Delta faucet in at my mother's house a few years ago and it now needs the handle to be carefully positioned to prevent it from leaking. It still looks decent, but it is only a few years.

    I have a Grohe tall, pull-out faucet at my place that has been there now about 13-years, and still looks and works like new. While it has some plastic parts, the main body is real SS. So, would I buy either again? Probably would on the Grohe, might on the Delta. Both have decent warranties.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    quote; The "no lead" laws? I thought they were good since lead turned out to be nasty stuff... You sure don't want to drink it.

    It is a solution to something that was not a problem. The POTENTIAL amount of lead from brass faucets and valves is so small as to be ridiculous, and, unless they have replaced EVERY service line to the water meters in Chicago, MOST homes have long lead pipe between the water main and the meter.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    DIY Senior Member DougB's Avatar
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    I have had good luck with Grohe (kitchen faucet - one that's been in service for about 18 yrs), and a shower thermostatic valve . Works like the day I installed it.

    Grohe has a lifetime warranty to the original purchaser - you need to keep your receipt. They tech support is pretty good.
    If a hammer won't fix it, it's an electrical problem.

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    DIY Senior Member dj2's Avatar
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    More on the "no lead" law: It will only be effective if every component along the water supply, from the source, through the city waterways to the homes, is lead free.

    Around me, the water co tells us to go "lead free" while they use galvanized. Where's the logic?

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    DIY Senior Member Reach4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dj2 View Post
    Around me, the water co tells us to go "lead free" while they use galvanized. Where's the logic?
    Galvanized has durability problems, but it's not poisonous.

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    DIY Senior Member DougB's Avatar
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    EPA slap down: Republican complaints about regulatory overreach by the Obama administration recently struck a chord with Democrats when localities learned new fire hydrants must have a significantly reduced lead content.

    The Environmental Protection Agency announced Oct. 22 that it believes the Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act of 2011 applies to fire hydrants.

    Members of Congress failed to persuade the EPA to change that interpretation, leading the House to vote unanimously on Dec. 2 to add fire hydrants to the list of fixtures, such as shower heads and bath tubs, that are exempt from the 2011 law.


    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/n...gress/4115311/
    If a hammer won't fix it, it's an electrical problem.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Default The EPA was created when president Nixon was in office.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_...tection_Agency

    In 1970, President Richard Nixon proposed an executive reorganization that would consolidate many of the federal government's environmental responsibilities under one agency, a new Environmental Protection Agency. That reorganization proposal was reviewed and passed by the House and Senate.

    The agency has approximately 17,000 full-time employees and engages many more people on a contractual basis. More than half of EPA human resources are engineers, scientists, and environmental protection specialists; other groups include legal, public affairs, financial, and information technologists.



    "The bureaucracy here in Washington sometimes gets too removed from the real world and they just focus on their narrow little corner of the world," he said. "So they are looking at water and lead. They are not looking at the cost of replacing. They are not looking at the taxpayers.''
    Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer of New York


    Last edited by Terry; 01-03-2014 at 10:37 AM.

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