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Thread: Stud interferes with new rough-in valve placement

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Todd J's Avatar
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    Default Stud interferes with new rough-in valve placement

    Hi, I've installed a new tub and now its time to mount and plumb in the new rough-in valve. The issue is that the new valve needs to be moved over 1 inch from the old valve to account for the new tubs drain location. However this lands the valve right into an existing stud. My options seem to be to remove a section of the stud and sister in a new one, or route the water line (copper) through and to the other side of the stud. When doing the latter I would also have to route the water line back to the inside of the stud to meet the existing line.

    Thanks for any input and suggestions.

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    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Is the wall a partion wall or bearing wall?


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member Todd J's Avatar
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    No, it is not a load bearing wall.

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    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd J View Post
    No, it is not a load bearing wall.
    That's good news.

    Easy enough then to move the stud out of your way.

    What is on the back side of this wall? Any finished drywall?

    I typically use my Fein Tool to cut through a stud in position and then peel it off the drywall - pulling the screws out the back side. Rarely does this cause any damage to the other side.

    Without a Fein tool you can drill a few holes in series where you want the cut. Finish with a hand saw and then pull the stud out. I would first remove the section of stud in your way and then build up new studs until the wall regains it's strength. You will find if you use a double stud as a replacement you can lap them together to make one strong stud.

    For example you can slide down a 3' stud below the tub to the left. Reach down and screw it to the bottom plate. Add a 5' stud above this and screw it to the upper top plate. Then add in a 6' stud to splice the two together and then a 2' filler. I would use 3" screws in pairs every 6"-8". The new double will be very strong and replace the one you hack up to make room.

    Remember at this stage you are not building a Piano - it's just framing for wall board.

    If this does not make enough sense let me know and I'll work on a sketch....

    Good Luck.

    JW


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Where is the problem with the stud? Is it in the way of the valve itself, or just causing a problem with a water line? If it is a water line, just drill two holes, one out of the valve and one to route the water line to the opposite side of the stud. If it is with the valve, and since this is not a "structural stud", you can cut away what you need without compromising the wall the least bit.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member Todd J's Avatar
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    Thanks hj and john for the advice.

    The stud interferes with the outlet for the water line. I think I will use hj's advice and just route the water line through the stud as needed. The wall is pretty studded as is, spaced at 7 1/2, 10 1/5 (void for valve), and 9 inches. The latter being sister'd with another stud turned 90 degrees to act as backing for the joint between the old green board and standard wall board.

    My reasoning for cutting out the stud was to reduce the bends in the water line and keep it as straight as possible, but I'm not sure is this is something I should be worried about.

    The fun part of this project and others I'm working on is that my dad built the duplex.

  7. #7
    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Are you using shower fixtures with high flow rates?

    That would be the only reason to omit some bends. You could always increase the pipe size or use flexible pipe and bring the water lines in via large loops.

    I have 3/4" pex lines to our daughters bathroom and 1/2" supplies off of that. Just one shower head at 2.5 GPM. other than the clearance fixture being a piece of crap (looks nice) the shower works great.

    It's when you start adding body jets, waterfall fixtures and the like you want power and flow. If your shower is more humble and basic then a couple 90's is no big deal.

    One of the Grohe techs or Dornbracht tecs spoke up a while back and talked about fitting wear on multiple bends and high flow rate showers.

    I guess these are always potential issues but personally I have never heard of a pex fitting failing because it was worn away - never ever.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    I often move studs for the plumbing.
    In new homes before the wiring was in, I used to knock out the middle stud, and install two studs on either side of the valve. On remodel you can't always do that.



    The tub that was pulled was 14-1/2" on center. The new tub is 16" on center.
    Sistering a stud gave me enough room to center the valve.



    The shower head was moved over 1-1/2"



    The old tub was 14" high. The new tub is 20" high.
    Last edited by Terry; 12-07-2013 at 11:39 AM.

  9. #9
    DIY Junior Member Todd J's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. I routed the water line in question into the valve by passing it through the stud. I still need to install the lines for the tube spout and shower head, but that should be straight forward.

    The next phase of the project is to install the cement backer board...

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