(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Wiring in a 220 circuit for Tankless water heater - Cunduit from behind the wall?

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member red_lover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Default Wiring in a 220 circuit for Tankless water heater - Cunduit from behind the wall?

    Hi Folks,
    I'm wiring in a new 220 circuit for a tankless Water Heater. I am pretty sure I am going to have to run it through conduit since I don't want to run the huge wires through the wall and ceiling, That would entail QUITE a lot of sheetrock work
    My question is, where/how do I have the wires\conduit come out from behind the sheetrock above the Circuit panel? Do I run the wires all the way up to the ceiling and have the conduit just poke through the sheetrock? Or can I go up just as far as I need to and then go to the surface from there?

    Here are pictures of what my setup is and what I need to do. You can see the old water heater off to the right and that is where I plan on putting the tankless unit.
    I know electricians must have to deal with this all the time, do they just rip out all the sheetrock as needed and then let the homeowner deal with replacing it all

    Name:  SANY0001-opt.jpg
Views: 150
Size:  37.7 KBName:  SANY0007-opt.jpg
Views: 152
Size:  41.6 KB

    Thanks for any help!

  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,605

    Default

    You will have to open the wall at the panel either to connect to it and then offset on to the surface, or go all the way up into the attic. Whether you run it in the attic or on the surface is immaterial. Since you do not want to cut the wall to run the wires to a junction box in the wall at the heater, just bring it down the wall to the J'box. The wire from the box to the heater. Why are you going electric when you have gas there?
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member red_lover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thanks hj,
    I've never actually used conduit before but when you say to offset it to the surface should I do it just above the panel or is it OK to come out to the surface further up at the ceiling just to avoid having a conduit going up the wall (since I have to cut into that wall anyway)?
    I have propane and it is EXPENSIVE, plus the tank is leaking. Here where I live electricity is cheaper to use.

    Thanks for your help!

  4. #4
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Land of Cheese
    Posts
    3,134

    Default

    There is nothing to say that the conduit cannot come out of the wall at any given point. I would follow the general path of the blue line, bending an offset above the panel before the 90.

    Be sure to read up on the truths of electric tankless heaters before you spend your money. In most homes, they will not be satisfying.

  5. #5
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,637

    Default

    Will your service handle the extra load ?

    You will need a bit of extra power.


    Good Luck.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

  6. #6
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NY State, USA
    Posts
    975

    Default

    IMO this is something best left to a pro.

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member Reach4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    1,247

    Default

    I would pull the cover on the breaker box, and look inside. Identify the knock-out that you would want to use to exit the box. Then measure carefully to the wall surface.

    Bending 1/2 inch conduit is not physically hard, but it is tricky to get the bends right. So, as I see it, you will have a piece of conduit that looks like this exiting the box. Name:  hugepipe2.png
Views: 125
Size:  1.7 KB

    I would bend that piece first. EMT is cheap. Bend that piece perfectly before you ever cut a hole in the wall. If you cannot make that piece, forget DIY. After you have your piece, you will know how big of hole you will need. You will use a 1/2 in. Electrical Metallic Tube (EMT) Set Screw Connector to put into the knockout from your hole, and you will use the nut to attach inside the box.

    I would put in a 1/2 in. 90-Degree EMT Pull Elbow where I switch to horizontal. You could just put another bend in that same conduit, but pulling that off will take more practice than you have ( or a computerized bender).

    I hope you get more suggestions. The preference for set-screw fittings vs compression can be regional. The compression fittings are prettier, but some areas prefer the set screw type for electrical reasons.
    Last edited by Reach4; 11-24-2013 at 09:23 AM.

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member bluebinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Santa Clara, CA
    Posts
    354

    Default

    I don't think drywall repair would be significantly more difficult than bending conduit in this case. It would take a little longer, but the result would look better...

  9. #9
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,637

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Reach4 View Post
    I would pull the cover on the breaker box, and look inside. Identify the knock-out that you would want to use to exit the box. Then measure carefully to the wall surface.

    Bending 1/2 inch conduit is not physically hard, but it is tricky to get the bends right. So, as I see it, you will have a piece of conduit that looks like this exiting the box. Name:  hugepipe2.png
Views: 125
Size:  1.7 KB

    I would bend that piece first. EMT is cheap. Bend that piece perfectly before you ever cut a hole in the wall. If you cannot make that piece, forget DIY. After you have your piece, you will know how big of hole you will need. You will use a 1/2 in. Electrical Metallic Tube (EMT) Set Screw Connector to put into the knockout from your hole, and you will use the nut to attach inside the box.

    I would put in a 1/2 in. 90-Degree EMT Pull Elbow where I switch to horizontal. You could just put another bend in that same conduit, but pulling that off will take more practice than you have ( or a computerized bender).

    I hope you get more suggestions. The preference for set-screw fittings vs compression can be regional. The compression fittings are prettier, but some areas prefer the set screw type for electrical reasons.


    How will the correct size wire fit into 1/2 inch ?


    I don't think it will.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member Reach4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    1,247

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DonL View Post
    How will the correct size wire fit into 1/2 inch ?


    I don't think it will.
    http://www.westernextralite.com/resources.asp?key=47 says he could put in 2 #6 AWG. That may not be enough. He could run two 1/2 inch conduits and carry one #2 in each. :-)

    If he has to go up to 1 inch, could get somebody to bend that with a power bender for him. I wonder if he could maybe use a large radius 1 inch EMT elbow to come out of the box at right angles to the wall, and avoid all bent conduit.

    Last edited by Reach4; 11-24-2013 at 10:58 AM.

  11. #11
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NY State, USA
    Posts
    975

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Reach4 View Post
    http://www.westernextralite.com/resources.asp?key=47 says he could put in 2 #6 AWG. That may not be enough. He could run two 1/2 inch conduits and carry one #2 in each. :-)
    Ummmm...not quite to code.
    Are you sure you should be giving electrical advice to others?

  12. #12
    DIY Senior Member Reach4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    1,247

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    Ummmm...not quite to code.
    Are you sure you should be giving electrical advice to others?
    A sentence ending with :-) is not advice.

    My advice to him would be to determine how much power that his proposed water heater is going to take, and plan from there.

    I am sure he would like to take advice from a pro beyond that which you gave.

  13. #13
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NY State, USA
    Posts
    975

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Reach4 View Post
    A sentence ending with :-) is not advice.
    Not where I am from. Maybe this " " though.



    Quote Originally Posted by Reach4 View Post
    I am sure he would like to take advice from a pro beyond that which you gave.
    Maybe, but in my mind, and considering the original post, I stand behind what I wrote.

  14. #14
    Electrical Contractor jbfan74's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Newnan, GA
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Chances are you will need at least 2 circuits, and maybe 3.
    If you think you will save that much with electric, then put in a 40 gallon tank heater.
    Yes I am A Pirate-Jimmy Buffett

  15. #15

    Default

    I would route it through the attic if I was doing it.

Similar Threads

  1. Wiring Bathroom/GFCI Circuit
    By 41Fever in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-19-2010, 05:08 AM
  2. Wall Heater Wiring
    By toolguy504 in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-12-2009, 04:24 AM
  3. Bathroom wiring circuit question
    By docpops in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-02-2008, 03:20 PM
  4. bathroom wiring; one circuit?
    By thegallery in forum Remodel Forum & Blog
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-28-2008, 09:11 PM
  5. 240V electric water heater on 120v circuit
    By miscmail1560 in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 12-12-2007, 04:52 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •