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Thread: What are the trade-offs in setting pump pressure?

  1. #16
    DIY Senior Member Reach4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    Did you mean to write doesn't?

    There is an economy curve that equates to a higher cost per gallon.
    A higher head/pressure will take more power to move a given amount of water.

  2. #17
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    The difference in energy use per gallon produced between 30/50 and 40/60 is negligible. The pump will have to run slightly longer at 40/60 to produce the same amount of water produced at 30/50. But while it is running longer, it is drawing less amperage and running cooler.

    Thanks LL, Yes “doesn’t” and now it has been corrected.

  3. #18
    DIY Senior Member Reach4's Avatar
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    A pump in a basement pumping to a second floor might be set to a higher pressure to compensate for the pressure loss with height.
    Last edited by Reach4; 11-20-2013 at 01:18 PM.

  4. #19
    Sprinkler Guy Wet_Boots's Avatar
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    Strictly on a dollars-per-gallon basis, you go with lower pressures and make do with it. For as much as I liked the effect of steamy hot water blowing from a shower head of 50 years ago with 90 psi behind it, a massaging shower head of today works on half the pressure and half the flow. Technology at work.

  5. #20
    DIY Senior Member guy48065's Avatar
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    "Make do" aint getting it. Is this what you tell customers?
    I do miss the forceful showers when I was on city water but now running 30/50 no matter what fancy shower head I try I feel like I'm being peed on in the upstairs shower. Amazing how 8 more feet of lift can kill the pressure.
    Romeo and Atlanta, MI

  6. #21
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    If you have enough pump and good plumbing without encumbrances, there is no reason not to enjoy good pressure.

  7. #22
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    If you have enough pump and good plumbing without encumbrances, there is no reason not to enjoy good pressure.
    Yeah I say this all the time. It is your water system. There is no reason you can’t have way more pressure than any city water supply. You just have to want it, and learn how to make it happen.

  8. #23
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    The more pressure your system has, the more maintenance you have on your water heater, fill valves, water lines, etc...

    You also have a better chance of getting a water leak that will flood your house quicker.

    The minimum pressure needed to maintain a good living should be used.


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  9. #24
    DIY Senior Member guy48065's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    You just have to want it, and learn how to make it happen.
    Teach me, ObiWan--that's why I started the thread.
    I'm seriously considering incorporating a CSV in both my systems. Constant pressure seems like the correct approach--it's definitely the approach in the hydraulic world I'm familiar with. I need to re-ask my question from post #11:
    If a CSV can be adjusted to maintain a 50psi flow is there any reason it can't manage 60?
    70?...
    Romeo and Atlanta, MI

  10. #25
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    The pressure switch needs to be set to shut off the pump at least 20 PSI lower than the max pressure your pump can build, considering the maximum pumping level. Then the CSV needs to be set 5 to 10 PSI lower than the off setting of the pressure switch. I run 50/70 on my pressure switch with a 60 PSI setting for the CSV as I have one bath upstairs. Love the pressure. Almost don't need soap in the shower, and never had any problems with the house plumbing.

  11. #26
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    The pressure switch needs to be set to shut off the pump at least 20 PSI lower than the max pressure your pump can build...
    I dare not test what the max pressure is that my pump can build since it exceeds the max pressure rating of my tank, iron filter, softener, and house plumbing. I have tested it to 80 PSI.

    Also, pumps run on a curve, so at max pressure the GPM is less than what is needed, so I'd get max pressure to fill a glass with water but less pressure at much higher volumes. The micronizer, iron filter, and softener also conspire to limit GPM which in turn limit pressure.

  12. #27
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Do not test the max pressure the pump can build by holding down the pressure switch. Yes the pressure could be well over 100 PSI. I use the max pressure on the pump curve, and subtract the pumping level or the pump setting level if pumping level is not known.

    Yes flow decreases as pressure increases, so at zero flow rate the pump builds the most pressure. When you are using water you can decrease the pressure by opening up more flow. But when there is no flow being used, the max pressure possible is determined by the pump curve and the water level.

    You just don’t want to turn up the pressure switch so high the pump can’t build enough pressure to reach the shut off point.

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