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Thread: Toto/Aquia

  1. #16

    Default Aquia

    I am shopping Toto for the first time, and the Aquia is on the list. How does the flush compare with the G-Max on other models?

    #1 reason for shopping Toto is to forget what a plunger looks like.

    #2 is the Aquia has the liquids/solids choice, like most toilets in Europe.

    If the Aquia flush is slightly more clog-prone than one with G-Max, we will go G-Max.

    One more question: This is literally in a wc, and the swing of the door comes within 33 inches of the back wall (if rough in is 12", front of toilet can be no more than 33" from same wall.) Is there a place that I can find these dimensions?

    Thanks for the informative site.

  2. #17
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Performance on the Aquia is good. The trapway is quite large too.
    I don't think anyone is going to be plunging this much.

    The top of the tank has a button divided by two, small part for liquids and the larger part of the button for solids.

    The toilet is 27-1/4" long, so with a standard 12" rough, expect it go be out from the wall 27-3/4".

    That's a very compact elongated bowl design.

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry


    Performance on the Aquia is good. The trapway is quite large too.
    I don't think anyone is going to be plunging this much.

    The top of the tank has a button divided by two, small part for liquids and the larger part of the button for solids.

    The toilet is 27-1/4" long, so with a standard 12" rough, expect it go be out from the wall 27-3/4".

    That's a very compact elongated bowl design.
    Does the Aquia have consumable parts? How much for whatever it uses for a flapper?
    Parts for for Aquia

    Thanks
    Last edited by Terry; 01-11-2009 at 02:00 PM.

  4. #19

    Default Aquia (and in general 1.6 gal) questions

    I'm thinking of replacing my 3.5 gallon American Standard (probably from around 1977 when I believe the house was built).

    My reasons for considering an Aquia are:

    1) Dual flush sounds so environmentally correct as well as money saving since you only use .9 gallons for liquid only flushes.

    2) I like the skirts on the toilet.
    a) Newer toilets show the "bowels" of the toilet which I don't care to see.
    b) Because of the smooth shape, I"m more likely to see anything that needs cleaning sooner than on the old fashon bowel shape followed by a steep angle to the base.
    3) I like the fact that even though the Aquia isn't ADA, it is higher than the standard 14.5".
    4) It seems not too expensive -- Under $300.00.
    5) It is a Toto, and so many websites list Toto as the brand that many plumbers prefer for their own homes.

    I am new to the 1.6 gallon toilet world. There aren't many Toto distributers in my area, and the ones I have checked out don't know much about the Aquia. They want to sell Toto's, but one comment is that if the Aquia is new it is probably going to have problems early on -- as did the Champion. Anyway, here are some of my concerns. [Please understand that they may sound like dumb questions, but I've never had to deal with the possibility of buying a 1.6 gallon toilet.]

    -----------------------

    1) Is it the nature of the beast that you have skid marks with 1.6 toilets?
    Is it especially true for the Aquia given that they have a small water area?
    2) Are 1.6 gallon toilets a bad way to go if you have people in your household that have large stools. Or would it be an extra problem with something that has a dual flush mechanism even if you choose the 1.6 button to flush?

    3) Is it a problem to flush 1.6 toilets if you use a lot of toilet paper, or the toilet paper you use is rather thick? Or what about people who flush napkins, paper towels, sanitary napkins, dirty mop water, etc, does that present a real problem? (NOTE: I've lived in this house for 20 years and only called the plumber once because it turned out that the calcium along the rim had affected it some. I have never needed a snake or anything on my sewer line.)

    4) Do you have to use a plunger more often?

    5) If you use a strong toilet chemical declogger (which I assume contains strong acids), will it cause the plastic device that connects the toilet to the hole in the floor to weaken and eventually crack/leak/break/etc?

    ---------------
    I called the tech support line at TotoUSA about Aquia concerns. He wasn't very positive about the Aquia. He mentioned a few things that bother me:

    1) Dual Flush technology is below the performance of both G-Max & Power Gravity.

    2) The Aquias don't have the "SanaGloss" finish, so they won't do as well at keeping away skid marks.

    3) The water level is very low so more likely to miss and have skid marks that are exposed to the air -- not water.

    4) The technology for the flush going straight down isn't as powerful, so it is better to go with the new "Cyclone" Toto flushing system. (Nothing against that, but the cost for such a system I was told is closer to $800.00.)

    After hearing their tech, I even have more doubts about the Aquia or for that matter 1.6 toilets. What good is saving water on the flush if you end up flushing multiple times, cleaning it more often, putting up with smells. Lately, we've had a bit of problem with my 3.5 not flushing consistantly. However, I fear I"m in for a rude awakening. Thus, I'm getting fearful about parting with my 3.5 gallon toilet.

    Can anyone enlightenme on 1.6 and specifically with the Aquia?

    Thanks
    Last edited by Terry; 07-31-2006 at 01:51 PM.

  5. #20
    DIY Member Spokaneman's Avatar
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    I don't know about the Aquina, but I put in a couple of TOTO Vespins about two months ago and they couldn't work better. Both have the SG finish, and are very good at staying clean. I replaced a first generation 1.6 gallon and one that was in the house when it was built in 83 (were those 3.5 gallon?). Both of the old ones were very prone to clogging, particularly the 1.6 gallon. In two months I haven't had a clog or a double flush required. I've retired the plunger.

    I suspect the dual flush wizbang is a bit of overkill, the Vespins are simple, but they work.

    the shopping cart
    Last edited by Terry; 05-31-2008 at 05:28 PM.

  6. #21
    DIY Member Spokaneman's Avatar
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    Oh, by the way, not to be indelicate, but I can put a pretty good load on the Vespin, if you know what I mean.

  7. #22
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    "We bought this identical toilet in January and are very happy with it. We are now ready to install the toilet in our half bath and would like another one."
    B. Hodapp 2/28/2006

    inquirer22,
    Performance on the Aquia is good, 800 on the MaP testing puts it right up there with G-Max.

    Bowl wash is good, being a washdown bowl, there is a lot of water going over the china.

    I have one in my home, and I've talked to others too, it stays pretty clean.
    In my home, it's the most used toilet.

    The Aquia has been out for six years in Tailand. It's not a new design.
    It's a proven six year design on the dual flush. The fill valve is made by Korky, the same as in the G-Max systems.

    It's not fair to even mention the name Champion and Aquia in the same breath.

    When toilets plug, you don't put chemicals down the toilet.
    That may be something that is used on kitchen grease, but not a toilet.
    I haven't noticed that plastic was bad though. Most plumbing waste and vents are plastic. It's the metal ones that are eaten by chemicals.

    The design is pretty clog free, and if it were to be plugged, something like a pail of water or a plunger would be fine.

    My water bills are very small.

  8. #23

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    Thanks everybody for your input. I did take the plunge (no pun intended), and I bought a Toto Aquia. (I may be one of the first people to get one in my town as I drove all the way to the Kansas City metro area just to find one Toto dealership that actually had even heard about the Aquia model and I was the second purchase at that store.)

    FYI, I don't know how soon it will be installed because it is just one of many things we are remodelling in the bathroom. Here are my thoughts just from what I saw:

    1) It wasn't as nice looking as the one-piece Caravelle Caroma that I saw, but it was a whole lot cheaper.

    2) I didn't see it installed, but I do hope the water spot doesn't mean a streaky toilet. She did say that was her biggest complaint about the Caromas.

    3) I wish the skirt went all the way back. I didn't like the fact that you can see the grey plastic piping that hooks into the floor. However, most people probably don't see the toilet from that angle since it will be in between the bathtub and a pedestal sink.

    4) I am concerned that it might not fit in my bathroom given that it is elongated as opposed to round. The over all length isn't that much different from my current toilet when you realize that it could actually go closer to the wall. However, I assume the hole in the floor for the drain will determine just how close to the wall it can go. (I have a slab house.)

    5) I kind of wish the flush button(s) could have been on the front or side so that the top could be used as a shelf. (Of course, 1.6 tank tops are much smaller than that of a 3.5-gallon tank top. So even if the button was elsewhere, you couldn't put much there anyway.)

    4) Overall, I thought the Aquia was an attractive toilet -- as toilets go. The skirt and the shape of the bowel are very nice. The base curves upward before you sit the tank, which looks nice. The shape of this skirt and this curve I mention should make it much easier to keep clean.

    Anyway, those were my thoughts. The real thing that counts will be how it turns out when I install it. I just hope that:

    1) It flushes everything down with one flush.

    2) It doesn't leak.

    3) It doesn't clog.

    4) It doesn't leave streaking.

    5) It doesnít smell.

    6) It lasts.

    7) It saves water. (This one Iím not worried about given that it IS a dual flush.)

    Anyway, if those conditions are met, then I'll be VERY happy with my purchase.

    I should add that I didn't buy a Toto toilet seat. I didn't care for the plastic seats, as occasionally it is nice to be able to stand on the lid. They had a really attractive wooden seat, but I don't want to pay $200.00 for a seat. I'm just glad it takes a standard elongated seat so I can look around some to see what I want to get.

    Iíll probably have questions when it is install time, but that might not be anytime soon. Thanks again for the input!

    I also wanted to add that I really love the www.terrylove.com website. The remodelling project started over a year ago (we are REALLY slow), and I was convinced from all the hype that Champion was the toilet to get. It wasnít until I googled 1.6 gallon toilets and found this site that I questioned the hype about the Champion.

  9. #24
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Inquirer-FYI-here is an award the Aquia recently won:
    http://www.designjournalmag.com/prod...ush_Toilet.htm


    Mine will be installed tomorrow. It IS made in Thailand and has been used there for 6 years. I can't make any comments requiring performance but I think the world will be installing them in the coming years. Congratulations.

    I don't think it's a matter of necessarily being a "Green" to want one. It's common sense that .9 gallon is plenty to flush a cup of urine.
    A family of four might save 5700 gallons annually. Do the math on the impact it could have water conservation

    I would not have found this item if not for Terry's site. thank you very much Terry.
    It's a relatively new item here in the US. (less than one year)
    Consequently it's featured in a big way as it should in the showrooms I've been to.

    If I had the room I would also get one of the mini waterless urinals, made by another manufacturer.

    Mike50
    Last edited by Mike50; 06-28-2006 at 06:46 PM.

  10. #25
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry
    "We bought this identical toilet in January and are very happy with it. We are now ready to install the toilet in our half bath and would like another one."
    B. Hodapp 2/28/2006

    inquirer22,
    Performance on the Aquia is good, 800 on the MaP testing puts it right up there with G-Max.

    Bowl wash is really good, being a washdown bowl, there is a lot of water going over the china.

    I have one in my home, and I've talked to others too, it stays pretty clean.
    In my home, it's the most used toilet.

    The Aquia has been out for six years in Tailand. It's not a new design.
    It's a proven six year design on the dual flush. The fill valve is made by Korky, the same as in the G-Max systems.

    It's not fair to even mention the name Champion and Aquia in the same breath.

    When toilets plug, you don't put chemicals down the toilet.
    That may be something that is used on kitchen grease, but not a toilet.
    I haven't noticed that plastic was bad though. Most plumbing waste and vents are plastic. It's the metal ones that are eaten by chemicals.

    The design is pretty clog free, and if it were to be plugged, something like a pail of water or a plunger would be fine.

    My water bills are very small.


    My Aquia is installed and everything above is true so far for me as well.
    As with anything new people will find reasons to criticize-that's just human nature. Bowl wash is awesome.
    It's a very fast but relatively quiet flush. They essentially expolited the gravity feature of toilets to the max.
    It's also the coolest looking toilet out there except for Kohlers hatbox or
    Toto's Neorest imo anyway. But for that kind of money I could put in a new patio.

    The fact that it comes with a softclose seat makes it a big winner also.


    This site has been of tremendous value to me. Thanks Terry.


    Mike50
    Last edited by Mike50; 03-09-2006 at 08:22 AM.

  11. #26
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    I'll make some editorial comments here. I'm unsure how quickly that developers/contractors will start installing Aquia's until the green movement goes mainstream in a big way. (another 5+ years is my estimate)

    We know one thing: Most renters are unconcerned with water conservation. period.
    It's interesting to note that Toto tried this toilet in Thailand for the last 6 years. Thai's are big on water conservation-they have been for hundreds of years. I'm a frequent traveler with family there as well.

    It will be curious to watch and see if developers of rentals and apartment units start installing dual flush toilets. That would play well in SF/Marin county and Boston but the jury is still out on Cleveland and Detroit if you get my drift.

    From my personal POV I have a real incentive to save. The average cost for water where I live is around 25 dollars per person per month. Which is ironic as we sit on a huge water table. Wells are not uncommon here.

    Mike50
    Last edited by Mike50; 03-09-2006 at 08:39 AM.

  12. #27

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike50
    I'll make some editorial comments here. I'm unsure how quickly that developers/contractors will start installing Aquia's until the green movement goes mainstream in a big way. (another 5+ years is my estimate)

    We know one thing: Most renters are unconcerned with water conservation. period.
    It's interesting to note that Toto tried this toilet in Thailand for the last 6 years. Thai's are big on water conservation-they have been for hundreds of years. I'm a frequent traveler with family there as well.

    It will be curious to watch and see if developers of rentals and apartment units start installing dual flush toilets. That would play well in SF/Marin county and Boston but the jury is still out on Cleveland and Detroit if you get my drift.

    From my personal POV I have a real incentive to save. The average cost for water where I live is around 25 dollars per person per month. Which is ironic as we sit on a huge water table. Wells are not uncommon here.

    Mike50
    This sounds very promising to me in the way of water conservation. I'm one of the only ones on my block who refuses to water the lawn in summer. This last year our water/sewer bill (it's all on one bill) went up by $20 (rate increase) so I'm always looking at ways to decrease our water use, which can be tough with two kids. Since I've read that posts here (this is a great board!) about this toilet's preformance being as good as the G-max system, that has pretty much convinced me that this is what we are going to get. It's a shame it doesn't come with the SG finish. Funny, you have to spend money to save money, LOL.
    Thanks for the info, it's been very helpful for me.
    T.

  13. #28
    DIY Member TPA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike50
    I'll make some editorial comments here. I'm unsure how quickly that developers/contractors will start installing Aquia's until the green movement goes mainstream in a big way. (another 5+ years is my estimate)

    We know one thing: Most renters are unconcerned with water conservation. period.
    It's interesting to note that Toto tried this toilet in Thailand for the last 6 years. Thai's are big on water conservation-they have been for hundreds of years. I'm a frequent traveler with family there as well.

    It will be curious to watch and see if developers of rentals and apartment units start installing dual flush toilets. That would play well in SF/Marin county and Boston but the jury is still out on Cleveland and Detroit if you get my drift.

    From my personal POV I have a real incentive to save. The average cost for water where I live is around 25 dollars per person per month. Which is ironic as we sit on a huge water table. Wells are not uncommon here.

    Mike50

    I don't think it's that most renters are unconcerned about water conservation, rather, the builders/developers of these apartment complexes try to get away with building them as cheaply as possible. I've never seen such shoddy construction and cheap masterials, as I have in apartments. Some of the apartments make trailers look like good, solid construction (which they're not). Keep in mind that many of these developers only hang onto the property for 2-3 years before selling it to another company, so longevity and quality AREN'T their concern.

  14. #29
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtjl
    This sounds very promising to me in the way of water conservation. I'm one of the only ones on my block who refuses to water the lawn in summer. This last year our water/sewer bill (it's all on one bill) went up by $20 (rate increase) so I'm always looking at ways to decrease our water use, which can be tough with two kids. Since I've read that posts here (this is a great board!) about this toilet's preformance being as good as the G-max system, that has pretty much convinced me that this is what we are going to get. It's a shame it doesn't come with the SG finish. Funny, you have to spend money to save money, LOL.
    Thanks for the info, it's been very helpful for me.
    T.
    This article from November 2005 FYI
    http://www.buildinggreen.com/auth/ar...me=141110a.xml

    I agree on the sanigloss but here is an option: use the Clorox w/Teflon Cleaner as Terry has mentioned. It's a product that works.
    You can access the map reports as well.

    Mike50

  15. #30

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry

    The bowl of the Aquia is fairly standard in shape, except that the lower part drops down sharply and has a small water spot. That is the case with most dual-flush toilet bowls.
    I am very close to purchasing two of these units, though the one hesitation I have is the initial water level (the one complaint people seem to have with this unit). In the picture you show, is there water in it? Is the initial water level really THAT low that I can't even see it? Does it fill up at least the area where it "drops down sharply"?

    Can anyone who has this unit or Terry himself give more details on the initial water level?

    Thanks!
    Daniel

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