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Thread: cast iron radiator

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Eagle71's Avatar
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    Default cast iron radiator

    Hello all. I need to remove a cast iron radiator next month for a bath remodel. I've done this many times but not during cold weather when the system needs to be on during renovations. I initially thought I could take out the radiator and plug the unions, but apparently there are differing opinions on this. I read that some people plug and others put a jumper pipe in between the two. I don't see the problem with plugging the supply and return since closing the valve somewhat does this anyway. What to do? thanks

  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    If the radiator has a valve, then you have a "main pipe" system and you can cap the risers. IT is when you have a "continuous" loop that a jumper has to be installed, but that type of system does not have individual valves.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member Eagle71's Avatar
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    Thanks man. That's what i thought. Just wanted to be sure.

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    DIY Junior Member Eagle71's Avatar
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    I removed the rad yesterday and capped off both copper lines. Then refilled and bled system. Just curious though, now that there is some air trapped in those two capped pipes will it adversely affect the system?

  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    IF you've got flow everywhere, the air in there will eventually be absorbed into the water and purged out, but that could take months. I doubt there is enough volume in those pipes to affect the water pressure much, or enough trapped oxygen to be much of an issue. I'd monitor the pressure over the first couple of weeks, but you'll probably not notice...depends on how the expansion tank is setup whether the volume change would make any difference...probably not.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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