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Thread: Commercial installation vs DIY (replacing existing IQ-0820 system)

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reach4 View Post
    The backwash depends not only on the amount of water but also the force and velocity of the water. It needs to be able to lift up the media. So your opening the path should help significantly.

    Flow rate during the refill cycle would normally be low. It gets restricted, and the restricted flow is timed to get the refill right, or the amount gets measured -- I am not sure which for a given system. When your system is set up to deliver more or less salt, the refill amount is changed. It is OK for the salt to be higher than the water level most of the time. The assumption is that the water will be salt saturated by the time of the regeneration.
    Reach4- Thanks for helping out. Yes, you can tell I am confused about all of this. When I opened up the drain line used during the back wash cycle, that had to make a big difference, at least in my mind. I am hoping that by the time I get through with all of this, I will "really" understand what is going on. My posts are rather long, but I get anal about this stuff and it bothers me when I don't know what is going on and totally have to relay on what the service people tell me. Now that I am seriously looking into this, it also bothers me that I wasn't somewhat closer to my current level of understanding when I originally purchased the system -- I probably would have opted for a different system. ron in round rock

  2. #17
    DIY Senior Member Reach4's Avatar
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    Ron, besides hardness, get the iron number too if you can.

    http://www.roundrocktexas.gov/home/index.asp?page=347
    http://www.roundrocktexas.gov/docs/final_ccr_2012.pdf shows hardness levels of 180 to 304 ppm with no mention of iron. Maybe iron is low there.
    Last edited by Reach4; 10-30-2013 at 02:28 PM.

  3. #18
    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
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    An adapter ring was made for that tank many years ago but it had a very high failure rate and has since been discontinued.

    The people dial with hardness etc is typically ignored. Most newer electro-mechanical system do not have that sticker. It is used to set the reserve capacity. Now we just simply determine the system capacity based on the salt setting, then minus 60 gallons of water per person in the household per day.

  4. #19
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Ron, all the regeneration cycle positions are timed and flow controlled. The salt saturation is usually finished in 2-3 hrs after refill and we get 3 lbs per gallon of refill. That white dial with the pins and holes in it you mentioned on the back of the timer controls the time. It usually says 2 min/hole or pin. Yours may be different. So write down the number of pins/holes I.E. 5 holes, 6 pins, 2 holes, 5 pins, 2 holes 2 pins xx holes for us.

    If that pin wheel does not rotate (in backwash etc.) at that X min per hole, the motor is not working or there is something else wrong like a contact switch or loose wire connection. Make sure you power to the valve.

    In case you want or need to replace your control valve, here is a link to SS tank adapters;
    http://www.apwinc.com/tankadapters-ss.html. Guaranteed to not break... Tell them I sent you.

    Actually if it was my softener and not working I'd replace the whole thing and advertise the old one for say $200 for someone with a smaller house. BTW, you need to size and program for the max hardness in your 'city' water because at times they will be mixing water sources and your hardness will fluctuate and the softener will let hard water through. Then you would need to do 2 manual regenerations at 15lbs/cuft one after the other with no water use during or between the two regenerations to get all the capacity back in the resin (30k/cuft). Otherwise you would not get 0 gpg soft water until you do them.

    Undoing the cable ties on the drain line may allow carbon out of the resin tank during backwash unless there is a top basket in the tank. If that happens you'll get carbon up in the valve and might have to take it apart to clean it out. So closing the main water shut off valve all but closed may be a good idea while testing the valve operation. Backwash usually is no more than 15-20 minutes. Brine draw/slow rinse can be 60 minutes or more. Rapid rinse like 5-10 minutes and refill maybe up to 15 minutes.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  5. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reach4 View Post
    Ron, besides hardness, get the iron number too if you can.

    http://www.roundrocktexas.gov/home/index.asp?page=347
    http://www.roundrocktexas.gov/docs/final_ccr_2012.pdf shows hardness levels of 180 to 304 ppm with no mention of iron. Maybe iron is low there.
    Reach4- Yeah, you noticed that too didn't you. I sent a note to our Utility Dept. yesterday asking if they could get me the iron content. Monica (who has given me good support in the past) got back with me saying she is going to work on getting me this information, but will be out tomorrow (Friday) -- but will get back to me early next week with what she finds out. ron in round rock

  6. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by ditttohead View Post
    An adapter ring was made for that tank many years ago but it had a very high failure rate and has since been discontinued.

    The people dial with hardness etc is typically ignored. Most newer electro-mechanical system do not have that sticker. It is used to set the reserve capacity. Now we just simply determine the system capacity based on the salt setting, then minus 60 gallons of water per person in the household per day.
    God Dittohead, what is going on with these systems where a simple (at least it sounds simple to me) adapter ring will not work -- but thanks for that info.

    I assumed that the people/hardness settings were somehow turned into a salt saturation regeneration equation -- and you could only guess what the system (the controller) is coming up with. I am not sure if I totally understood your other comment. Are you saying that you figure out how many days it would take to reach the system's capacity and run your regeneration cycle just before that point.

    I thought I read that you could get better efficiency by doing the brine draw thing with a smaller saturation level (not really sure I am phrasing that right) -- which is more or less controlled by the amount of water and the time spent in the brine draw cycle. (i.e. I understand the brine itself is still maximally saturated (like is 15 lbs. / cu ft. the max saturation for salt in water), but if you reduce the amount of time or water used during the brine draw cycle, you are essentially reducing the saturation level and raising the efficiency of that cycle. (I think I am getting in over my head here - it is just that this saturation / efficiency has captured my attention.) ron in round rock

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    Ron, all the regeneration cycle positions are timed and flow controlled. The salt saturation is usually finished in 2-3 hrs after refill and we get 3 lbs per gallon of refill. That white dial with the pins and holes in it you mentioned on the back of the timer controls the time. It usually says 2 min/hole or pin. Yours may be different. So write down the number of pins/holes I.E. 5 holes, 6 pins, 2 holes, 5 pins, 2 holes 2 pins xx holes for us.

    If that pin wheel does not rotate (in backwash etc.) at that X min per hole, the motor is not working or there is something else wrong like a contact switch or loose wire connection. Make sure you power to the valve.

    In case you want or need to replace your control valve, here is a link to SS tank adapters;
    http://www.apwinc.com/tankadapters-ss.html. Guaranteed to not break... Tell them I sent you.

    Actually if it was my softener and not working I'd replace the whole thing and advertise the old one for say $200 for someone with a smaller house. BTW, you need to size and program for the max hardness in your 'city' water because at times they will be mixing water sources and your hardness will fluctuate and the softener will let hard water through. Then you would need to do 2 manual regenerations at 15lbs/cuft one after the other with no water use during or between the two regenerations to get all the capacity back in the resin (30k/cuft). Otherwise you would not get 0 gpg soft water until you do them.

    Undoing the cable ties on the drain line may allow carbon out of the resin tank during backwash unless there is a top basket in the tank. If that happens you'll get carbon up in the valve and might have to take it apart to clean it out. So closing the main water shut off valve all but closed may be a good idea while testing the valve operation. Backwash usually is no more than 15-20 minutes. Brine draw/slow rinse can be 60 minutes or more. Rapid rinse like 5-10 minutes and refill maybe up to 15 minutes.
    OK, Gary, tonight is the night. It's after midnight now and will likely be 1 am or later by the time I finish this note. The water used dial is setting at "0", which I was hoping means that the regeneration cycle should happen tonight. I will check it just before I go to bed, but will not wait up till 2 or 3 am in the morning, because it might not regenerate until tomorrow night -- just don't know.

    Regarding the dial on the back side of the controller, yes it is white, with a comment that 1 pin equals 2 minutes. The dial goes from 0->160 and I have 6 pins between 0 and 10 (probably 0-12), another 6 beginning at 70 and another 2 pins at about 110 -- I have no idea what any of them mean. I laid my cut/removed cable ties around and on the little black cam type wheel (a wheel with raised notches that control some sort of solenoid switch) so that tomorrow I will know if that wheel cycled through 360 degrees tonight.

    Gary, sorry, but I don't understand how opening up my drain line could cause a problem. I can't think of a reason in the world that the guys that installed would take a 5/8-3/4 fairly stiff hard rubber hose and pinch it almost closed with a cable tie. The hose was closed so much that if any or the resin did escape the tank, I am sure that it would have plugged the drain line -- although the activity in the tank had to be sorely muted because of the reduced water flow through the hose.

    I am probably repeating myself, but the reason I am so worried about the regeneration cycle is that in the past, as I mentioned, I used to have a lot of water in the brine tank and the water was always above the salt level, even though I had 3-4 (maybe 5) bags of salt in the tank. Occasionally, I would have the salt above the water line, but after a regeneration cycle, the water was usually always above the salt (with the salt at a level that the guy that installed the system marked for me on the big white tube/pipe in the brine tank). Right now, I have purposely let the salt get real low and there is about 3 inches of salt in 6 inches of water, the salt resting on the platform in the bottom of the brine tank, which I think is 4-5-6 inches above the bottom of the brine tank, so there is another 4-5-6 of water there.

    So Gary, will/should the brine draw cycle empty the water totally out of the tank -- or as you say, if it is timed, I guess it will just take a fixed amount of water out of the tank, providing there is enough water in the tank to take out. And on the brine refill, is the controller set up to replace just the same amount of water that it took out -- and again, if totally timed, I guess it should put water back in for the time period that it took it out -- and I suppose the controller is smart enough to compensate for pressure in, pressure out. I mentioned that I was playing with the brine line when playing around with the regeneration cycle and during the draw cycle, there was not a lot of suction in the brine line and during the fill cycle, the water just sort of drained out of the tube with little or no pressure. And again, I have no idea what the suction in or pressure out should be.

    it is a little after 1 am now and I just checked and nothing is going on yet, so I think I will give it up for the night. I might stay up, but my wife has one of those fun colonoscopy's in the morning, so I think I had better be there for that. I think I have enough things set up to see if the regeneration ran, but honestly, I am not sure just how to verify what went on. With the limited amount of salt in the brine tank, I should probably fill it back with salt and do a manual generation -- and when I do that, I will likely be back seeking help on what I should be seeing. ron in round rock

  8. #23
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Not all salt water is sucked out, there is always 2.5" +/- left under the brine pick up tube in the bottom of the tank that can't be sucked out. The refill water is usually timed and the slow rinse/brine draw is always timed. Brine draw stops way before the slow rinse finishes.

    Not being able to see the back/top and left side of your control valve... here is what I just told another guy with an Ionics like yours.... The most common causes of too much brine water are (in order of probability).... loose brine line connections (one on each end of the brine line and the one under the float valve in the brine well in the brine tank where the brine pickup tube connects to the valve), blocked injector or injector screen (under the brass/steel plate held on to the side of the brine valve before the brine line connection), blocked drain line, leaking brine valve (where the brine line connects to the control valve.

    Salt in the tank displaces water and the more salt the higher the water level goes. Too much salt and you don't get the full refill volume of water into the tank because that float in the brine well stops the refill flow too soon and does that so salt water doesn't overflow the tank and ruin the floor. That's one reason I say not to fill a brine tank with salt.

    Any of that above and you run out of capacity and get hard water instead of softened water. Then, after finding and fixing the problem(s) you do 2 manual regens at 15 lbs/cuft of resin one after the other with no water use during or between them to fully regenerate all the resin back to 30k/cuft.

    Resin 'beads' are less than a 1/16" dia and rarely can block up a scrunched up drain line. Neither does carbon.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  9. #24

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    Gary- Well something happened overnight. I "think" the system went through regeneration because the water and salt levels are different this morning. The following changes are noted:
    - Water counter is back to its beginning point at 1400 (from 0)
    - Water level in the brine tank is about 3 inches above the bottom plastic platform now (was 6 inches last night)
    - Salt level is in brine tank is about 2 inches above the bottom plastic platform now (was 3 inches last night)
    So it appears to me that more water was taken out of the brine tank than was put back in. That's a problem, isn't it?

    I don't even know how that could happen -- i.e. how did the water ever get higher in the first place EXCEPT last week when I became alarmed because the water level seemed so low (way down below the salt level), I dumped a bunch of water into the brine tank, somewhere around 4-5 gallons -- so maybe that explains my question of how did the water get higher than what was being put back in. So what is my next step? I am assuming/hoping that this is something that can be fixed.

    I know I can/should take the brine hose off and check it for some clogging, but I know it is not entirely clogged since it is working, just not that well. Then there is the lack of any water pressure to speak of when re-filling the brine tank -- should there be some water pressure at that point. (The suction in the brine draw cycle isn't that great either, but it is obviously sucking more water out of the tank than is being put back in -- at least that's what appears to me that is what is happening.) Is there something in the controller/valve area that could cause this -- something that can be taken apart and cleaned or replaced. For some reason I am discounting a difference in the timing for each of these cycles since it used to work just fine. I believe you Gary, but I guess I am a little surprised that the whole system is run on a timed basis, particular the water in and water out cycles. It seems to me that over time one of the other would win out (i.e. over time, either too much water or too little water).

    So is there anything else I should/can check before I start taking things apart. I know the water is not coming close to raising the float up high enough for it to shut off the brine fill cycle. I hate to mention this because I think it is impossible for the brine float adjustment to slip on its own, but earlier this summer, I can't remember why, I decided to clean out the brine tank. So I emptied it entirely and in the process, pulled out the float and everything else in the than. Anyway, I found that the float was set so low that only a few inches of water in the tank would have caused the brine fill cycle to shut off. That's why I hate to mention it because I don't know how it ever worked. I re-adjusted and raised the float at least a foot, probably more -- but still had the cutoff point way below the little drain hole on the side of the brine tank. Gary, regarding your comment about too much salt raising the water level too high, maybe the salt packs together much more than I realize and a small amount of water in the tank can rise to a high level with a lot of salt. I used to think that the tank had a lot of water in it.

    OK, enough of me talking. I would appreciate suggestions on my next step. Is the manual regeneration cycle identical to the automatic regeneration cycle? Should I be doing some manual regens and be measuring and recording things (like add a bunch of water to the tank so that I could measure how much is being drawn out and measuring the time for this to occur, as well as make the same measurements for water going back into the tank) -- just thinking out loud. ron in round rock

  10. #25

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    [QUOTE=Gary Slusser;397535]Not all salt water is sucked out, there is always 2.5" +/- left under the brine pick up tube in the bottom of the tank that can't be sucked out. The refill water is usually timed and the slow rinse/brine draw is always timed. Brine draw stops way before the slow rinse finishes.

    Salt in the tank displaces water and the more salt the higher the water level goes. Too much salt and you don't get the full refill volume of water into the tank because that float in the brine well stops the refill flow too soon and does that so salt water doesn't overflow the tank and ruin the floor. That's one reason I say not to fill a brine tank with salt.

    Any of that above and you run out of capacity and get hard water instead of softened water. Then, after finding and fixing the problem(s) you do 2 manual regens at 15 lbs/cuft of resin one after the other with no water use during or between them to fully regenerate all the resin back to 30k/cuft.

    -------------------
    Gary - OK, I did it -- and I found the problem that I was worried about -- except it may not be a problem, it might just be me not understanding the various water cycles.

    I have over 4 pages of notes, that I won't type in and bore everyone, particularly to you guys that know what is going on. So to keep it simple. let me just mention the things troubling me.

    A complete Regen cycle takes about 170 minutes (i.e. almost 3 hours)
    The 1st step, the Back Wash only lasted about 12 minutes
    Next was the Brine Draw which lasted about 60 minutes
    - I have figured out that this is probably controlled by the 6 pins at 0-12 and another 6 pins
    - beginning at 70 on the big white wheel in the back of the controller
    Next was the Brine Draw cycle:
    - The water was down 5 inches within 15 minutes and down to the salt level within 20 minutes
    - and the tank was essentially sucked dry within 35-40 minutes of the beginning of the Brine Draw
    (this was roughly 14 inches, or roughly 21 gallons of water)
    - The brine hose continued trying to suck more water out during the next 20-25 minutes of the Brine
    - Draw cycle, so I know it would have continued to suck water out if any had been left in the tank
    (I equate tank with 2 inches of water left in it as being empty, as you noted above)
    OK, next was what I think is called the Rapid Rinse cycle - which lasted about 12 minutes
    - Again, triggered by the 6 pins on the big white wheel
    And Finally (almost finally), there was the Brine Fill, which lasted about 30 minutes
    - During the roughly 25-30 minute Brine Fill, the water was raised to about 2 inches above the platform/shelf
    - in the bottom of the tank (for a total of about 8 inches of water being added to the tank, approx. 12 gallons).
    Then there was another 4 minutes (2 pins on the big white wheel) for something (may for everything to stabilize, don't know)
    Followed by another 60 minutes where nothing was going on
    - I guess just to let the big white wheel get back to its starting position

    So here are my comments and questions (comments first):
    The Brine Draw cycle will always take a lot more water (brine) out of the tank that it puts beck into the tank (i.e. 21 gallons out and 12 gallons in). This means that for the next Regeneration cycle, only 12 gallons can be drawn out of the tank -- and that I believe is the most that can every be used during any Brine Draw cycle since that is all the is ever put back into the tank (UNLESS there was supposed to have been more water put back into the tank via much more water pressure during the 25-30 minute Brine Fill cycle).

    Let me comment (confess) something here. Before I started the Manual Regeneration cycle, there was only 2 inches of salt in the tank resting on the shelf/platform in the bottom of the tank. The water was an inch or two above the salt. I wanted to watch and measure what was going on during the Regeneration cycle, so I added several gallons of water to the tank -- raising the water level to maybe 8 inches above the platform in the bottom of the tank thinking that the extra water would not hurt anything and I could measure how much water was sucked out of the tank during the Brine Draw cycle -- and was very surprised when all of the water was sucked out of the tank within the first 35-40 minutes of the brine draw cycle. As I mentioned above, had there been more water in the tank, that would have been sucked out also as there was suction on the brine line during the entire 60 minutes of the Brine Draw cycle. I have notes on noises in the controller and water draining out, but don't think what is germane to what is going on here.

    I know the system has never been re-programmed (yet), so I have to assume that it was set up this way -- and that the Brine Draw cycle will always empty the tank and that there will only be about 12 gallons of water replaced in the tank. So is my system working after all. I have not refilled it yet with salt, but as I mentioned, the water level is only about 2 inches above the platform in the bottom of the tank -- and I KNOW that when used to fill it, when I had 2 or 3 (maybe 4) sacks of salt pellets in the tank, I could still see the water level. I suppose I will find out when I put more salt in the tank, but if I add 3 more bags of salt to the tank, is it reasonable to think that the pellets pack together enough that the water will be still be visible above the level of the salt.

    OK, back to the real question. Is this cycle normal. Is the ability to suck out maybe 30 gallons (or more) of water out of the brine tank and the ability to only return 12 gallons to the tank during the Brine Fill cycle sound like this thing is working. I have lots of notes about what was going on if you have any other question. Thanks. ron in round rock

    P.S. This P.S. added via an edit the next morning. Sorry, I forgot one other question having to do with the Brine Draw cycle. Since the cycle lasts 60 minutes and the Brine Draw cycle has sucked the Brine tank empty in maybe 35-40 minutes, what is happening the other 25 minutes or so. The water keeps flowing out of the drain hose during this period, so I am assuming that during the rest of the cycle, the controller is getting water from the water input pipe coming into the house. The point I am asking about here is, since the brine tank is empty, there isn't any additional brine to be used for the Back Wash (I guess this is not a Back Wash, is it -- it is more of a resin clean cycle), so the system must just be using untreated water during this period -- which I would think is maybe using up some of the softening capacity of the resin since the brine solution has already cleaned up the resin. So I am confused again. So exactly what is going on with extra 25 minutes of the Brine Draw cycle. Is this the way it is supposed to work. ron in round rock
    Last edited by rnsmithtldiy; 11-06-2013 at 05:06 AM. Reason: To add a P.S.

  11. #26
    DIY Senior Member mialynette2003's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=rnsmithtldiy;398097]
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    OK, back to the real question. Is this cycle normal. Is the ability to suck out maybe 30 gallons (or more) of water out of the brine tank and the ability to only return 12 gallons to the tank during the Brine Fill cycle sound like this thing is working. I have lots of notes about what was going on if you have any other question. Thanks. ron in round rock
    The unit will draw water as long as there is water to be drawn. Once the unit goes into a draw cycle, it will continue to draw for the entire brine draw time. What stops the water from being drawn is the air check. Once the brine water level reaches the "check height", the check ball seats stoping water and/or air from being drawn into the system. I lived in the RR area for 13 yrs before moving to Fla.

  12. #27

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    [QUOTE=mialynette2003;398105]
    Quote Originally Posted by rnsmithtldiy View Post
    The unit will draw water as long as there is water to be drawn. Once the unit goes into a draw cycle, it will continue to draw for the entire brine draw time. What stops the water from being drawn is the air check. Once the brine water level reaches the "check height", the check ball seats stoping water and/or air from being drawn into the system. I lived in the RR area for 13 yrs before moving to Fla.
    mialynette- Wow, what an early response to my long post. I added a P.S. to my post (via an edit) this morning because I just remembered this morning that I was still confused about the Brine Draw cycle (as well as the shorter fill time). I understand what you just said, which verifies that my system is acting correctly during this cycle (i.e. draws water until tank empty) -- but what is going on with the remaining 25 minutes-or-so where the water is still being flushed through the tank (i.e. I guess, since water is still coming out of the drain hose). Is this normal. It appears to me that the controller is forcing a constantly diluted brine solution through the resin, maybe to the point that the resin is cleaned up and begins to start its softening during this 25 minutes. Can that be possible. Is it normal to have this cycle run for, in my case 25 minutes after all the brine solution has been drawn out of the brine tank. ron in round rock

  13. #28
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Yes it sounds as if it is working as it should.

    The time that the regeneration runs for is up to the contact switch finger falling off the last of those last 2 pins on the pin wheel. They get everything (the piston and brine valve) back to Service. Usually in not more than 75-90 minutes and the regen is done but the wheel takes longer to get back to the beginning.

    I suggest not filling the salt tank because not filling it causes you to check the salt tank for excess water more frequently than every few months.

    We all were posting at the same time... the time past the time it takes for the air check to check is slow rinse. It is used to flush the resin with brine and start to get it out of the resin tank. Then Rinse compacts the resin bed and makes sure all salt water is out of the resin bed before going into Brine Refill and back into Service.
    Last edited by Gary Slusser; 11-06-2013 at 05:49 AM.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  14. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    Yes it sounds as if it is working as it should.

    The time that the regeneration runs for is up to the contact switch finger falling off the last of those last 2 pins on the pin wheel. They get everything (the piston and brine valve) back to Service. Usually in not more than 75-90 minutes and the regen is done but the wheel takes longer to get back to the beginning.

    I suggest not filling the salt tank because not filling it causes you to check the salt tank for excess water more frequently than every few months.

    We all were posting at the same time... the time past the time it takes for the air check to check is slow rinse. It is used to flush the resin with brine and start to get it out of the resin tank. Then Rinse compacts the resin bed and makes sure all salt water is out of the resin bed before going into Brine Refill and back into Service.
    Gary- The good news for me is your opening statement: "sounds like it is working like it should".

    OK, I don't want to keep filling up the brine tank either (although I thought that to be a temporary fix if something was broken) -- I just did that to see if I could trace what was going on.

    So, I think/guess what you are saying is that the 8 inches of water (which I calculated to be about 12 gallons or water) above the 2 inches of water always left in the brine tank, being put back into the brine tank during the 25-30 minute Brine Fill cycle is good enough -- good enough to make a brine solution (heaviest enough of a brine concentration) to adequately do a good regeneration of the resin on the next regeneration cycle.

    Based on what I saw/timed, if there was only 12 gallons (because that is all the Brine Fill puts back in, and all it will ever put back in) in the brine tank when the Brine Draw cycle started, the entire brine tank would be emptied within the first 20-25 minutes of the Brine Draw cycle -- giving it another 35 minutes-or-so in the slow rinse cycle (I guess this is maybe why they call it a "slow" rinse cycle). Not knowing "exactly" how this stuff is supposed to work, this seems strange to me.

    But I think you are saying that this time is OK and is really necessary to get all of the brine solution out of the resin -- am I understanding what you are saying correctly or have I said that right. Sorry I am so anal about understanding exactly what is going on. ron in round rock

  15. #30
    DIY Senior Member mialynette2003's Avatar
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    Think about the brining cycle being divided up into 2 sections: Brine and Slow Rinse. As long as there is water being drawn from the brine tank it is considered to be in the brine draw cycle. Once the water is gone, even though the unit has not advanced, it is now in the slow rinse cycle. So the entire cycle is about 60 min, it is divided into about 20 min for the brining and 40 min for the slow rinse.

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