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Thread: Soiree Install Issue...don't think it will work! Please help.

  1. #16
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Drywall isn't that hard to patch (even if it's plaster)...had you considered just moving the line? IF that was the only thing holding me up, that's what I'd do. Now, if it was through the floor and I'd just tiled it, that wouldn't be fun, but still doable.

    I had to do some moving around at my mother's house with plaster walls, and used my RotoZip to cut out a chunk, after, I added some cleats to the back side, then screwed the old plaster chunk back, and filled the gap left from the RotoZip's bit. You can't tell where that was done, and it really didn't take all that long.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  2. #17
    DIY Junior Member jbf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    Drywall isn't that hard to patch (even if it's plaster)...had you considered just moving the line? IF that was the only thing holding me up, that's what I'd do. Now, if it was through the floor and I'd just tiled it, that wouldn't be fun, but still doable.

    I had to do some moving around at my mother's house with plaster walls, and used my RotoZip to cut out a chunk, after, I added some cleats to the back side, then screwed the old plaster chunk back, and filled the gap left from the RotoZip's bit. You can't tell where that was done, and it really didn't take all that long.
    Yes, I've thought of it. The prior toilet had a wall mounted tank and I did not participate in its removal. When I got back in town the plaster was a mess, the old shut off valve was leaking and I had no flange on the floor. As you can see in the photo, I patched and repainted, installed a new pipe nipple and shut off valve and I have purchased an Oatley twist-n-set flange. I probably sound like a whiner but I prefer not to re-do all this (although I might have to).

    The house is old and the plaster is very hard, like a rock. I use masonary bits just to hang pictures from the walls. I believe the plumbing in this wall is original and fragile. It feeds below into an almost inaccessible crawl space. I have discovered over 18 years of ownership that small projects always lead to delays and some creative improvisation to complete. I just built a new lake house in Maine (original 1928 cabin destroyed by Hurricane Irene 2 years ago) and it is refreshing when everything is new and standard size. It's like playing with Legos.

  3. #18
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Other than being really dusty (a shop vac running while cutting really helps), my RotoZip cut the old plaster (from the early 1950's) quite easily. If you marked where the studs are, and cut a chunk out centered in the bay, with an edge on the studs, you may not need to install any cleats, just screw it back into place, then fill the gap. Since the paint is new, matching should be easy. If the pipe is copper, it should be easy...if it's say galvanized, THEN things get messier. Course, I do recognize, it doesn't always work out well...been there, done that.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #19
    DIY Junior Member jbf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    Other than being really dusty (a shop vac running while cutting really helps), my RotoZip cut the old plaster (from the early 1950's) quite easily. If you marked where the studs are, and cut a chunk out centered in the bay, with an edge on the studs, you may not need to install any cleats, just screw it back into place, then fill the gap. Since the paint is new, matching should be easy. If the pipe is copper, it should be easy...if it's say galvanized, THEN things get messier. Course, I do recognize, it doesn't always work out well...been there, done that.
    Yes, galvanized. I may take it on anyway.

  5. #20
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...s-and-pictures








    With copper in the wall and a less then 6" off center





    Guinevere on the right, similar to what the Soiree will be.

  6. #21
    DIY Junior Member jbf's Avatar
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    Thanks for the great photos. Now you have me thinking there is a slim chance. I think I need to find a local install or showroom to do my own close inspection.

  7. #22
    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbf View Post
    Thanks for the great photos. Now you have me thinking there is a slim chance. I think I need to find a local install or showroom to do my own close inspection.
    The Terry install pictures with the 90-degree turn where the supply comes out of the wall is something you should consider. Take a look at the Dahl skirted toilet installation thingy -- it combines a 90 with a top-quality ball valve shutoff. I think that's what's in Terry's picture. http://www.dahlvalve.com/products/mi...oilet-kits.php

  8. #23
    DIY Junior Member mikkifinn's Avatar
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    I am back to report that, after reading your replies, Reach4, jadnashua & wjcandee, I called the Toto tech people and also spent some time talking to them. The Toto guy was very nice, and he thought that my toilet was already roughed in at 10" on a 12" b/c it was sitting too far from the wall. However, he thought it would work, and suggested the 10" unifit as a back-up.

    I talked to my plumber & he came over to check it out. He said it was a 12", but the tank was 2" shallower than it was supposed to be. Like I said, almost everything about that ProFlo was a hot mess. So, I went ahead & ordered the Soiree, and the 10" unifit adapter, just to be on the safe side.

    He installed it today, and as it turned out, the 12" was fine and I still have space between the back of the toilet and the pipes. The valve was fine, too, although the edge of the base of the toilet pushes the bottom collar of the valve up a bit, but it is still level.

    As I have learned with old houses, the thing you think is going to be the problem usually never is...it usually turns out to be some other random, unforeseen thing. In this case, everything fit fine, but when my plumber had to drill into the tile for the extra 2 bolts, the tile was so hard that it was almost impossible for him to get through, and he had to use several different bits and a hammer & chisel to break it.

    So, thank you so much for your advice and support. The Soiree looks great, and hopefully will live up to the hype on its flushing performance.

    jbf, good luck with your situation. I hope it works.

  9. #24
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The only thing I've found reliable on some hard porcelain is a diamond bit. Sometimes you can do it with a carbide bit, but not always. SOme porcelain is nearly as hard as diamonds.

    Glad it's in, and I'm sure you'll be impressed...these toilets are well designed. The only thing I ever do to mine is a water quality thing. The flapper valves last me maybe 5-years before they get soft and start to leak. The easy way to tell is to see if the lip is still horizontal...if it is curving, and the middle is dropping, eventually, it will fall so far into the hole because of the water pressure above it, it will start to leak. How fast that happens depends on your water, and the chemicals you (you should never add any!) or the water company put in it.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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