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Thread: Copper repipe

  1. #16
    DIY Junior Member bobbyb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    quote; The inspector will say: every joint with excess solder is a potential future leak.

    Not any inspector I know.Excess solder on the surface has absolutely no relationship to the amount INSIDE the joint. INSUFFICIENT solder will create a weak joint which would be a potential leak, BUT there is seldom any outward indication of insufficient solder. Rigidly strapping piping does NOT create leaks, but "loose" strapping which allows movement CAN create a weak spot in the tubing if wear occurs. The final two statements, i.e., "you will have leaks for sure", and "If you want to sleep at night, etc", are hyperbole and based on opinions which have little to support them. Unless it leaks when the water is turned on, I would not worry about it. Any ProPress joints which were "missed" will leak, intentionally, so they can be properly sealed with the tool.
    Thanks for the input hj. So if I understand correctly, the sloppy soldering and pipe positioning is not necessarily an indication of any actual issue with the pluming. Is it safe to say that if the pluming passes a pressure and water test it's in decent shape?

    Another concern I had was with the possible tension placed on the straps of the pipe seen in the bathroom (as it is not positioned on a straight angle coming down from the attic). Is that any cause for concern? Or should strapping such a pipe down pose no problem?

    Thanks again.
    Last edited by bobbyb; 10-14-2013 at 07:36 PM.

  2. #17
    DIY Senior Member Murphy625's Avatar
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    Wow.. I thought this was a joke when I first saw the photos.

  3. #18
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    quote; Is it safe to say that if the pluming passes a pressure and water test it's in decent shape?

    Unfortunately, no. But that applies to ANY installation, not just yours. I once had a customer who dropped a can of peas onto a copper elbow that had been installed 20 years previously, and it "fell apart" causing a flood. The pipe had only been inserted into the fitting about 1/8" but had held all that time, until the can dislodged it.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  4. #19
    DIY Junior Member bobbyb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    quote; Is it safe to say that if the pluming passes a pressure and water test it's in decent shape?

    Unfortunately, no. But that applies to ANY installation, not just yours. I once had a customer who dropped a can of peas onto a copper elbow that had been installed 20 years previously, and it "fell apart" causing a flood. The pipe had only been inserted into the fitting about 1/8" but had held all that time, until the can dislodged it.
    Virtually nothing is ever guaranteed, but what's the risk factor? The fact is that most of the work is already done. Had I done it myself I'd want it to look beautiful, but aesthetics are just that. Based on what you've seen in the post, is there good reason to be alarmed, or only the possibility something might go wrong (just as a possibility exists with many other contractors)?

    I want to approach this in a fair and balanced fashion. Not looking for groundless bashing of the work (and I know many find comfort bashing the work of others), just trying to figure out the likelihood of actual harm being done. Being a layman, at some point it's going to boil down to a level of trust either way.

    Thanks.

  5. #20
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    I want to know why the guys that installed it didn't pressure test it?
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  6. #21
    DIY Junior Member bobbyb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Sawyer View Post
    I want to know why the guys that installed it didn't pressure test it?
    The job is in progress, it would be tested upon completion.

  7. #22
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Like hj, I don't believe the extra solder indicats a bad joint. More like he kept applying solder longer than needed. Not a big deal at all.

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