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Thread: Little Giant versus J-Series subemersible water well pumps

  1. #31
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michla View Post
    Along the same topic, what is the life expectancy of a pump control box ? My Franklin control box is working fine, but the whole system was installed in 1984. When I spoke to Franklin Motors over the phone, the tech told me it's ok to reuse if it's working ok since it matches exactly with the new pump I'm going to install. But I'm wondering if a large capacitor that's been in service like that is worth trusting. Anyone?

    It would not hurt to have a new cap on hand. Capacitors do not last forever.

    If it is a metal case then it may be oil filled for one that old, and they last a long time, as long as they don't rust thru.

    If a cap leaks or is bulged, then it is time to replace it. When they dry out inside they will normally open.


    Good Luck.
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  2. #32
    DIY Member michla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    You don't have to stop watering the lawn. You only need to match the draw so that it doesn't cycle.

    As for buried, I think it is against code to bury wells anymore. It should stub out above ground.
    Oh, sorry--I didn't really mean buried....yes there is a 2 feet stub, I was implying something so expensive to service.
    I have a fairly small water tank so cycling would be an issue trying to water the grass in summer.

  3. #33
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michla View Post
    I have a fairly small water tank so cycling would be an issue trying to water the grass in summer.
    If you can't match the draw to the pump, a CSV can do it for you.

  4. #34
    Sprinkler Guy Wet_Boots's Avatar
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    I remember a client who had three or four huge conventional galvanized tanks in a separate room, presumably so a sprinkler system wouldn't short-cycle the pump. They were so big that they would never fit through a door, so they must have been put in place as the house was built.

  5. #35
    DIY Member michla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    If you can't match the draw to the pump, a CSV can do it for you.
    ok clue me in--a CSV ?

    (maybe "centrifigal sprinkler valve"?)

  6. #36
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    CSV = Cycle Stop Valve
    www.cyclestopvalves.com

  7. #37
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    I have seen several applications where the building was constructed over a huge pressure tank or two. We just disconnected the big tank, installed a CSV (Cycle Stop Valve) and a little bladder pressure tank at the end of the huge tank(s). Now there is plenty of space to put in a bedroom or at least a tool shed. But somebody is going to need to torch that old tank into small enough pieces to get it out the door first.

    We even have small cities where the water tower has been replaced with a CSV and a little 80 gallon size tank. But removing the old water tower, especially because it is covered in old leaded paint, would cost so much they just leave the water tower standing as a place for some kid to spray paint a defense to his sister’s honor.

    Here is a graphic to show the CSV system compared to the old pressure tank system. Notice that the pump with the CSV runs continuously no matter what or how much water is turned on while the old style system cycles on and off repeatedly. Cycling on/off is the biggest killer of pumps/motors.

    http://www.cyclestopvalves.com/simple/home.php

  8. #38
    DIY Member michla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    CSV = Cycle Stop Valve
    www.cyclestopvalves.com
    thanks ! that's really helpful !

  9. #39
    DIY Member michla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    Cycling on/off is the biggest killer of pumps/motors.
    So I suppose the only big disadvantage of the CSV setup is when the power goes out--no residual water storage. And with the power on, a pump running continously is going to consume more electricity.
    So which becomes a more expensive investment over say the (modern version) 15 year life of the pump ?

    It would appear the pressure tank in the CSV setup is only an air bladder that amplifies water pressure. Why not do away with a tank altogether and then install an overrated submersible pump that runs the moment a set residual line pressure drops? There's plenty of water-hammer arrestors out there.
    Last edited by michla; 10-16-2013 at 07:40 AM.

  10. #40
    DIY Member michla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonL View Post
    It would not hurt to have a new cap on hand.

    dammed good advice ! I like it

  11. #41
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michla View Post
    Why not do away with a tank altogether...
    Even the VFD pumps have a small tank. Just because the CSV can work with a small tank doesn't mean you need to change out to a smaller one. Any small draw would start/stop the pump... any draw... leaky toilet flapper, ice maker, humidifier, RO filter.

    As for energy consumed, it varies by pump maker as to how the impellers are fixed or floating, but a pump moving less water uses less electricity up to a point. As I said, standard practice is to match your sprinkler system to the pump wherever possible.

  12. #42
    DIY Member michla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post

    As for energy consumed, it varies by pump maker as to how the impellers are fixed or floating, but a pump moving less water uses less electricity up to a point. As I said, standard practice is to match your sprinkler system to the pump wherever possible.
    thanks much, good advice

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