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Thread: PVC solvent weld integrity question

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member bslbb's Avatar
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    Default PVC solvent weld integrity question

    Hi, I'm a new member here but I've been reading the forums for a long time and appreciate all of the helpful information!

    Today I was "gluing" a 1-1/2" PVC drain stub-out to the elbow in the wall using SCH40 PVC rated for DWV. Cut pipe using chop/miter saw for square cut. Deburred and beveled edge slightly. I prepped both parts with clear cleaner and purple primer, followed immediately by PVC cement (all Oatey brand) and applied using the documented procedure. Immediately assembled the parts and rotated 1/4" turn (the pipe was fully seated) and held it in place tightly for at least 30 seconds. Released it and it seemed fine, wiped off excess but I looked back 30 seconds later and it had pushed out about 1/8".

    So the big question is can I trust this joint? I'm hoping since it's for drain and not highly pressurized it will be OK otherwise it's going to be quite a bit of work to replace. But I'm looking for an expert opinion.

    Thanks,

    Bryan

  2. #2
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    I think you are fine with that. It's a solvent "weld"
    There is a bit a transference of the two fittings when the "glue" is used.

  3. #3
    Plumbing Contractor for 49 years johnjh2o1's Avatar
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    The primer is all that's need before applying the PVC cement. There is no need for the cleaner.

    John

  4. #4
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    If you can not pull it apart it is probably OK.

    30 Seconds is not long enough in my opinion, just because of what you seen happen.

    Sometimes you can pull it apart and re-weld it.


    Good Luck.
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  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    An 1/8" is insignificant. Don't worry about it.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member bslbb's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for the feedback! I just checked it and the joint is very solid and there is no way I'd be able to pull it apart. So I will leave it as-is.

    John, thanks for the tip about the cleaner. Is that just a clear version of the purple primer?

    Don, the second joint I put together I held for about 90 seconds just to be safe. And that one stayed put...so I agree 30 seconds is not enough for this size pipe. For 1/2" it seemed OK though.

  7. #7
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The fitting is actually tapered. The larger the pipe, the bigger the tendency for it to push out. Until enough of the solvent evaporates, you have a slippery round pipe inside of a slightly smaller tapered one...it will try to push out if there isn't enough resolidified material to hold it in place. It gets worse if you apply excess cement - more solvent to evaporate before it solidifies. It can get quite frustrating if you aren't ready for it. It can be a major pain on something like say a toilet flange where it pushes itself up off the floor and is dangling there; best to have the screws ready and hold it down until you can get at least one screw in, or place a weight on it. Been there, done that...have had to cut apart a run to fix things, too...experience certainly helps, and most DIY'ers don't do it often enough to get the right touch, so it takes longer and doesn't look as pretty.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The surface tension of the liquified glue is what pulls the pipe out of the joint unless you hold it long enough for adhesion to occur.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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