(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 42 of 42

Thread: Repair of replace advice

  1. #31
    DIY Junior Member rfreda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DonL View Post
    Yes, If it is sticking it will need to be repaired.
    Good Luck.
    what problems do a sticking brine valve cause? From a quick search it appears that there may be more water in the salt tank than required. I have noticed the water line is higher, more than 1/3 up the tank. The last time the company came out they drew a line on the tank where the water should be in normal operation, and I think it's higher than that.

  2. #32
    DIY Senior Member mialynette2003's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ocala, Florida
    Posts
    666

    Default

    The valve is set to allow a certain amount of water in the brine tank to use x amount of salt. With the brine valve stuck in the open position, water is allowed to fill the brine tank until the safety shut off stops the flow. This will cause excessive salt useage.

  3. #33
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,646

    Default

    It will cause the problem that you are seeing. It will use more salt.

    If the water get high enough it will run your salt water out the overflow.


    Good Luck.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

  4. #34
    DIY Junior Member rfreda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Thanks guys - I knew this salt usage was abnormal. I will call for a visit and would like to revisit the resin discussion again. Given this is good equipment with serviceable parts, it sounds like changing out the resin may make sense to prolong the service of this system.

    As mentioned earlier, I think they want $300 to do it when I know I can get the resin for $100 or so but I don't have the time/experience to do this.

    Would you throw like $500 (guess) into this equipment or trade it in? Similar quality equipment can't be cheap today and I'm thinking they'll give me a digital controller which is less reliable in the long run than what I've got. Opinions?

  5. #35
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,646

    Default

    My opinion can be taken with a grain of salt.

    I try to work on everything in my own home. I have found nothing that can not be fixed, If you throw enough money at it.

    You can learn what makes it work. The Internet is a great place for info.

    You have sites like this one that have pros that are glad to help, if you need it.

    Terrylove.com is the best. And you get the opinions of others that will tell you how to do it best.


    I would fix it myself, and save a few hundred. But that is just my thought.


    Good Luck.
    Last edited by DonL; 10-04-2013 at 07:45 AM.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

  6. #36
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    rfreda,

    There are a number of causes for too much water in the salt tank..... From the most frequent to the least frequent... loose brine line fittings that allow air suction instead of heavy brine water (including the one under the safety overflow valve where the brine pick up tube connects to the valve, blocked injector or injector screen, or blocked drain line. In my experience it is rare for your type brine valve to leak water into the salt tank but it could be leaking. You can test that by disconnecting the brine line from the valve and seeing if you get water out of the valve after any water in it drains out.

    You tighten plastic brine line fittings with plastic ferrules hand tight plus a 1/2 turn; if brass nuts and brass ferrules go hand tight plus a full turn. If they have been tightened more than that, it usually deforms the brine tubing and you should cut off about 3/4" and reinstall tightening them correctly.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  7. #37
    DIY Junior Member rfreda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Not sure which way to go - I'm not doing this myself and have a quote from the water company. Estimated quote for a new brine valve, replacement of resin, and replacement/repair of piston and seals (if needed since I mentioned that the piston blew a few years ago) is ~$450-500. Hopefully that's worst case. The resin is $150 and they charge $89/hr.

    I also asked for a quote on a new unit. The price is $1,338 after a $281 trade-in credit, with a 5 year warranty on the valve. Computerized valve control, salesman claims a 30-50% reduction in salt usage, and I told him I already have a metered unit and would the savings be less. He said yes, but would still be more efficient than the old unit. It is a Clack valve as a prior poster mentioned.

    So is it worth it to get new technology and replace 20 year old equipment for the $900 or so differential? I don't plan on moving either.

    Thoughts?

  8. #38
    DIY Senior Member mialynette2003's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ocala, Florida
    Posts
    666

    Default

    That's not a bad price for a Clack installed. Make sure it is a metered unit. I always ask at what point do you trade in a car that is nickle and diming you? The motor or motors are not being replaced. If they go out in a couple months, you have another service charge. I'm not trying to get you to buy a new unit, but that is the things to consider.

  9. #39
    DIY Junior Member rfreda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    13

    Default

    It is a metered unit, and that was my thinking as well - I don't want to throw another $500 at this again in the next few years. I got 20 years out of it, I think it's time.

    Thanks

  10. #40
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,646

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rfreda View Post
    It is a metered unit, and that was my thinking as well - I don't want to throw another $500 at this again in the next few years. I got 20 years out of it, I think it's time.

    Thanks

    With the price of salt on the rise it may be a good move to just replace it.

    Salt savings alone would be a good plus.


    Good Luck.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

  11. #41
    DIY Junior Member rfreda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DonL View Post
    With the price of salt on the rise it may be a good move to just replace it.

    Salt savings alone would be a good plus.
    Good Luck.
    that's a good point. I usually just go to Sears Hardware and buy 4/5 bags at a time for like 20 something bucks but if you add up what it costs in a year, it's not insignificant. Today I'm scheduling the install for next week.

    Thank you to all who have contributed, this is a very helpful site.

  12. #42
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,646

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rfreda View Post
    that's a good point. I usually just go to Sears Hardware and buy 4/5 bags at a time for like 20 something bucks but if you add up what it costs in a year, it's not insignificant. Today I'm scheduling the install for next week.

    Thank you to all who have contributed, this is a very helpful site.

    Don't look back, You are making a good decision.

    I use the Morton Rust removing salt, Green bag, and it is about $8 a bag at WM. Be careful with additives.

    Many pros will say Green Bag is a waste of money, But my 20 year old softener is working fine. Additives may work if you have a proper dosing system.

    I would never add iron-out if you have a system failure. It is not a fix all.



    Have Fun.
    Last edited by DonL; 10-11-2013 at 10:08 AM.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

Similar Threads

  1. When to repair - when to replace?
    By shendrick in forum Water Heater Forum, Tanks
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-31-2012, 11:57 AM
  2. Repair or Replace?
    By momof6 in forum Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and reviews
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-18-2010, 09:20 AM
  3. Repair or replace?
    By adamw in forum Water Heater Forum, Tanks
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 12-13-2009, 02:38 PM
  4. Repair, replace, or????
    By david3394 in forum Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-10-2009, 01:32 PM
  5. Need Advice: Repair or replace system
    By hans_idle in forum HVAC Heating & Cooling
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-11-2008, 06:50 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •