(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 30 of 30

Thread: Which water softener should I buy...getting desperate!

  1. #16
    DIY Senior Member lifespeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    319

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    There's something wrong if a tub with a 1/2" valve or 1/2" plumbing if it can't flow at more than 7 gpm. Outside faucets on 1/2" with a 1/2" valve flow much more than 7 gpm.
    Would that be a thermostatic or pressure-balanced outside faucet?
    Lifespeed

  2. #17
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    I don't see anythng about either of them in what you said. Here is what I replied to; "I've got a 1/2" tub fill valve fed from 3/4" pipe at 70 psi. It flows 6-7 GPM, and actually fills the tub pretty quick. Subjectively, it looks like a lot of water!

    Unless you have a 3/4" valve and spout I doubt you'll get more than 7 GPM at the tub."

    So are you now saying your tub has one of them and assuming Deb has one too?
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  3. #18
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Debthegardner View Post
    I'm Back!

    After having 5 guys over and getting bids from $1200 all the way up to $7000 for a water softener system, not counting a new R/O unit, I am completely flabbergasted and just want to know your learned opinions on which softener (brand) I should buy. Here is some data: 625 dissolved solids in laundry sink, 72 solids at R/O, which now has a ruined bladder, and about 90 degrees of hardness. Three bathrooms, 2 people at present. We are on city water, no wells, so chlorine may be an issue. Have spoken to Pentair, EcoWater, Logics Autotrol, and a few other people whose products I can't recall. Since we bypassed an old, dying Kenmore 6 weeks ago, I have noticed buildup of scale on the shower floor. Any specific brand names and models would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks guys!
    Wow, a whole lot of replies and none of them addresses your question. 1st off you need an accurate water test done so the unit can be properly sized. 2nd, I think we are talking about softeners or at least that's what the salesmen are trying to sell you. Lets start there. If you are somewhat handy you could buy the equipment online and install it yourself at a substantial savings. If not, you are probably stuck with what you can find locally but, look for valves from Clack, fleck and autotrol and stay away for proprietary stuff like Kinetico and cullingan. I doubt you need a high flow valve and the fleck 7000 sext does qualify as a high flow valve. That said, the 7000 is a very versatile valve and you can't go wrong with one. It is the only valve I currently stock because of its versatility. That said though a fleck 5600 or the Clack ws will do you just fine also. Get an accurate water tat done though or these guys will continue to chew this thread up until one of them either says uncle or fades away LOL
    Last edited by Tom Sawyer; 10-01-2013 at 06:02 PM. Reason: I ain't fixing it LOL. Dumb auto correct
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  4. #19
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    All valves are versatile and for residential applications the other valves you mentioned are a bit more versatile than the 7000. They have the option for upflow counter current regeneration and can be used on smaller tanks than the 7000 can be. Plus the others are all physically smaller and they take up less space than a softener with a 7000.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  5. #20
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    Dont hardly ever do no upflow for residential treatment and yep, the valve is a bit larger but we have basements up here and its pretty rare that space is a problem. If you are stocking valves it just makes sense to stock the 7000SXT. A single valve will take care of 99% of all residential and a bunch of commercial applications as well.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  6. #21
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    IMO the Clack WS-1 would be a better choice for those (dealers, plumbers, drillers) that want to repair rather than replace valves when there is a problem. Fleck still has you disconnect the valve from the plumbing to get to their turbine where Clack's comes out the side of the outlet in about 10 seconds but, you've said you don't repair so I guess I'm talking to those others.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  7. #22
    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,707
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Wow, the meter can be serviced from the side, so it is better? How often do you have to repair or replace the meter on a Fleck or Clack? Every 10-20 years if that? Testing the Fleck meter is much simpler to troubleshoot since its cord is not integrated. Wouldnt that make it better? We could do this all day, but dont you ever get tired of it?

    Upflow regeneration, yaya, I have 2 customers that bother with that, and they only do it for marketing reasons, not for actual function or efficiencies.

    The 7000 can be used on systems down to 8" without a problem, and up to 24" in diameter for both softener of backwashing systems. The 7000 can also accomodate external relays, internal relays, microswitching, and even has a PLC light version available in the NXT and XTR board configrations with flow controlled outputs, and extensive programming capabilities that is not available on the Clack. that being said, so what.

    Both clack WS1 and 7000 are excellent. I have already shown that the 7000 is more compact than the old 5600 electromechanical or the 2510 electromechanical valves. i never see you complain about their size.

  8. #23
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Where have you shown that the 7000 is more compact than electromechanical 5600 or 2510?

    How does the 7000 compare size wise to the electronic versions of the 5600 and 2510?
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  9. #24
    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,707
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Sigh, you really want me to go searching through old threads to show you? I will pass, but thanks anyway. You can do the search if your memory is fading that fast.

    Here is a picture of the two valves, 5600 and 7000 with meter, bypass, plumbing connectors. The 5600 electronic turbine meter saves approximately 2"

    The Fleck 7000 is about 1/16" shorter than the 5600 and 2510 electromechanical meter systems. You get so strangely stuck on how huge the 7000 is, I guess if you consider 2" huge lol!

    Name:  700560.jpg
Views: 123
Size:  44.9 KB

  10. #25
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    IMO the Clack WS-1 would be a better choice for those (dealers, plumbers, drillers) that want to repair rather than replace valves when there is a problem. Fleck still has you disconnect the valve from the plumbing to get to their turbine where Clack's comes out the side of the outlet in about 10 seconds but, you've said you don't repair so I guess I'm talking to those others.
    Yer gonna hafta find where I said I don't repair valves cause I don't believe I'd ever say that. In fact I've got a 2510 sitting on the bench right now that's getting refurbed for an elderly couple that can't afford a new valve.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  11. #26
    DIY Member silversaver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    42

    Default

    I have been using 7000 for 8 months now, love it but....

    First I did complain about the softner not getting the water soft enough, trying to increase the brine time but fail. After so many attemp, I spot the problem. The design of 7000 valve.... either brine timer fail or I need a bigger brine tank. I set the brine time to 40, which should give me about 10 gallons of water to dissolve 30lbs of salts for a 15 lbs/cuft setting (64k grain). The water will stop filling brine tank at last 16 min remaining. I'm doing my research maybe overflow valve stop filling up the brine tank or I need a bigger brine tank? Call my installer about the recall on Fleck 7000 valve, but the response is: if it isn't broken, I cannot get it replace....lol Oh well, I have no choice but looking for easier solution: fill the brine tank manually by adding 3 to 4 gallons of water after each regeneration..... Now, my baby girl can enojoy real soft water.

    The water is soft and flows were great, but I have to add water to brine tank after each regeneration. The decision is yours.

    I'm not sure why Fleck valve distributor will not allow me to exchange a recall unit. Maybe Dittohead might know?? Or Jason doesn't want to do the job?? I referral my friend to him....anyway good luck.
    Last edited by silversaver; 10-02-2013 at 11:22 PM.

  12. #27
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    The float in the salt tank may have to be raised to allow more refill water into the tank or.... take some salt out of it and don't fill it full.

    You are getting terrible salt efficiency. If you needed 60,000 grains between regenerations, you should have bought a larger softener. 15lbs/cuft gets you 2000 grains/lb.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  13. #28
    DIY Senior Member mialynette2003's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ocala, Florida
    Posts
    663

    Default

    On another post here it was discovered that the float assemble was not set properly to allow enough water into the brine tank. So the correction to your problem may be a simple adjustment of the float.

  14. #29
    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,707
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Raising the float height is very simple but setting the unit to 15 pounds per cu. ft. is not a good idea. Look inside the brine well, the floats can be adjusted to shut off at any height. Most are just rubber sliders that control the height of the float.

    Silver, do you have a Hach 5B test kit? Sounds like you are trying to achieve 1 PPM hardness, very inefficient.

  15. #30
    DIY Member silversaver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    42

    Default

    As Dittohead mention in other thread, it is a Clack safety float. Simply remove the pin, cut the rod shorter, drill a small hole on the shortened shaft, reinstall, good to go. It is not adjustable...

    It is not about salt efficiency, I just want my family enjoy real soft water. I don't mind carry the salts home. I'll re-adjust the brine time down to 12lbs setting and see how it goes.

Similar Threads

  1. Need help desperate!..ONE BATH HOME!!
    By theelviscerator in forum Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-10-2013, 10:39 AM
  2. How to empty water softener? (Kenmore deluxe demand water softener 625)
    By birkoff in forum Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and reviews
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-22-2013, 08:56 PM
  3. PLUMBERS- Your Opinion PEASE! I'm desperate
    By dab2667 in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-11-2012, 09:02 AM
  4. Have to get this well working...desperate.
    By Thefixer in forum Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-16-2011, 06:26 PM
  5. Desperate need of help!
    By jasonpbutler1 in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-14-2009, 07:11 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •