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Thread: Lowering 3/4 hp submersible pump down 100ft

  1. #16
    DIY Senior Member craigpump's Avatar
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    VA,

    Ok, I know that as a pump n dump system where you're not returning any water back to the source.

  2. #17
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craigpump View Post
    ...where you're not returning any water back to the source.
    A two well, open loop returns the water to the same aquifer from where it came.

  3. #18
    In the Trades Texas Wellman's Avatar
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    FWIW the return wells always seem prone to plugging. The hardness in the water will drop out in low pressure situations (like after a CSV), eventually causing the return well to lose acceptance rates and generally making a mess in the yard.

  4. #19
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    That was why I asked about water quality.

  5. #20
    DIY Junior Member nc73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VAWellDriller View Post
    I'm local to you and know the area.....if your well driller did his job remotely right, there should be almost no draw down in your well when pumping, so if that's the case, most of the loop will be in a stagnant section of water and you'll have terrible heat transfer...not to mention the problems with the pitless adapter connection and pump in your 4.5" well. You should confirm that he did a good job and put in a larger pump and run an open loop system. Water quality is good and open loop is more efficient anyway.
    You know it was dug in 91, and there is no cap or pitless adapter, piping is from the top directly down, sealed with spray foam and some insulation! Oh man it looked like a diy affair but oh well it works. I do agree with open loop. What's the going rate to dig a reinjection to the same aquifier? If cost is up there I'd like to go with just a dry well enough to dump into if I'm going to do an open loop. I have another dug well but its only 40ft and not taking any water. All else fails I'd do a horizontal trench.

  6. #21
    DIY Senior Member craigpump's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    A two well, open loop returns the water to the same aquifer from where it came.
    The ones I have seen dont use injection wells

  7. #22
    DIY Junior Member nc73's Avatar
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    Recent test showed good water quality. I'm just concerned with dumping all that water and the other issue being the dump location.

    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    I'm not very well versed on geo, but what is your water quality like? Would an open loop, returning the water to the well be an option?

  8. #23
    DIY Junior Member nc73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    You could use a heat exchanger at the bottom of the Geo loop. It would transfer heat much better than a plastic pipe loop. You could make one out of copper pipe easy enough. Either way, with the heat exchanger or an open loop setup, you will need to bleed enough water from the well to make it work. When you are using water from the well, it is bleeding plenty to transfer the heat/cool. When not using water you could hook up a bleed valve controlled by temperature coming from the loop pipe.
    Yeah I was thinking bleed too but again I need a place to dump that bleed water. I wonder what the efficiency is like since I don't have bedrock. Clay isn't that great of a heat conductor.

  9. #24
    DIY Senior Member VAWellDriller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Wellman View Post
    FWIW the return wells always seem prone to plugging. The hardness in the water will drop out in low pressure situations (like after a CSV), eventually causing the return well to lose acceptance rates and generally making a mess in the yard.
    Again, function of water quality, also when we do it, we install a pitless unit and piping inside down below the water level in the return well....that way, you don't aerate the water and cause iron and such to precipitate. Another problem with return wells is that people try to be cheap, and don't install a good well, or develop the well properly. The return well is just as important, so we drill a mirror image, and develop it the same way. A lot of folks try to go shallower, and put it back in another aquifer to save money on the return well.....it never works. I know of lots of return wells that accept in the hundreds of gallons/minute; almost continuous for years, no problems.


    Cost for a return well....I'd be about $6000-6500 for a 370' well, fully cased and screened, gravel packed, grouted and developed.

  10. #25
    DIY Senior Member craigpump's Avatar
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    $6000-$6500 sounds more than fair to me, but I know the mentality of most homeowners. If they can't see it and show it off, they probably won't spend the money to have the job done right.

  11. #26
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nc73 View Post
    Clay isn't that great of a heat conductor.
    The water comes from a porous aquifer under the clay and gets its temp from Mother Earth. My neighbor's 300+ foot rock well produces surprisingly tepid water, not cold like my 65 foot mud well.

  12. #27
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craigpump View Post
    If they can't see it and show it off, they probably won't spend the money to have the job done right.

    lol

    That is funny but true.

    Plus the power savings of putting something in and maintaining it will not pay for itself in a lifetime.


    Have Fun.
    Last edited by DonL; 09-24-2013 at 10:04 AM. Reason: op error
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  13. #28
    DIY Senior Member craigpump's Avatar
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    LL is right about clay being a poor conductor of heat, that's why they have to put so much sand in the grout when grouting in the loops.

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