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Thread: Super S compressor

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member mightymoose's Avatar
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    Default Super S compressor

    My Super S compressor is crazy loud and I want to replace it. I'm just not certain what the pressure rating should be for a new one. From what I can tell it should put out at least 60 psi, but I'm not clear on min/max pressure.
    I've found a compressor with the right electrical specs but would appreciate any input on the pressure specs before I commit to a buy. Thanks.

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    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    That is it supplying air too
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    DIY Junior Member mightymoose's Avatar
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    The compressor aerates the the water in the media tank to oxidize sulfur/iron and whatnots. It is a 10" media tank.
    It costs $100 just to get Culligan to come to the house, so I figure I can replace the compressor for a fraction of the cost of what it will ultimately cost for them to do it.

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    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    There are a lot of online companies that will sell you the appropriate compressor. Compressors are rather for volume @ pressure. So you need to see what your current one is rated at. It's on a sticker somewhere
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    DIY Junior Member mightymoose's Avatar
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    You would think so. It is a Culligan compressor with the electrical info on the sticker but that is it. I suppose they leave certain info off to make you go through them for parts.
    The troubleshooting section of the manual indicates that 65 psi is minimum and that is about all I have found so far. I think I have found a Thomas compressor that is a good match, and it even looks the same and has same dimensions... might even be an exact replacement. I just want to confirm ratings. I figured the specs on these compressors for filter systems are likely somewhat standard.

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    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    That compressor should be fine as long as it meets the minimum pressure. Or, you can search for "Air Pump Systems" and see what compressors are used and get one of them.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

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    DIY Junior Member mightymoose's Avatar
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    Determining if it meets the pressure requirements is what I am hung up on.
    The Culligan manual indicates that the compressor should have dead head 65 psi or better. I haven't found anything indicating a max pressure.
    There are no markings on the compressor indicating cfm specs.
    The compressors I am looking at have ratings for continuous and intermittent psi, but I am not certain if that is the same as the dead head measurement or if it is something else.
    The one I am looking at indicates 20psi continuous and 40psi intermittent, which appears to be too low from what I can tell. However, the physical appearance and even the dimensions of the compressor appear to be a perfect match for what is on my Culligan filter.

    Can anyone shed some light on the difference between continuous and intermittent pressure ratings and whether it is the same as the dead head pressure?

    I would hate to get something that puts out too much and damages something else.

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    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mightymoose View Post
    ...I have found a Thomas compressor that is a good match, and it even looks the same and has same dimensions... might even be an exact replacement.
    If it is an exact replacement, why would it be any quieter than the original?

    The only thing I'd worry about is making sure whatever compressor you use puts out NSF-quality air. One way to reduce the noise would be to install a large compressor and accumulator tank, so that the compressor needs to run only when the tank's pressure drops below the minium required by the system. You'd have to devise your own control system to match up with the Culligan system's demands, and (of course) filter the heck out of the air coming out of the tank.

  9. #9
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey View Post
    One way to reduce the noise would be to install a large compressor and accumulator tank...
    I'm no Culligan Man but maybe the compressor is slaved to the well pump or activated by a flow switch. Using a tank, one may need to slave in a solenoid valve.

    I assume the compressor has gotten noisier over time and that a new one would be quieter. If that is not the case, the compressor could be moved to another location that is soundproofed.

  10. #10
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mightymoose View Post
    Determining if it meets the pressure requirements is what I am hung up on.
    The Culligan manual indicates that the compressor should have dead head 65 psi or better. I haven't found anything indicating a max pressure.
    There are no markings on the compressor indicating cfm specs.
    The compressors I am looking at have ratings for continuous and intermittent psi, but I am not certain if that is the same as the dead head measurement or if it is something else.
    The one I am looking at indicates 20psi continuous and 40psi intermittent, which appears to be too low from what I can tell. However, the physical appearance and even the dimensions of the compressor appear to be a perfect match for what is on my Culligan filter.

    Can anyone shed some light on the difference between continuous and intermittent pressure ratings and whether it is the same as the dead head pressure?

    I would hate to get something that puts out too much and damages something else.
    Many dealers, mostly independent dealers, sell the same system. Al the compressor does is add air to the mineral tank to maintain a head of sir for the raw water to fall through as it enters the filter. That increases the dissolved oxygen content of the water which helps certain media to do their job. The compressor has to run at a higher pressure than the well pump is able to produce and the pump and compressor come on at the cut in (start) pressure switch pressure that the pump's pressure switch is operated at. Usually the compressor runs when the pump runs but the compressor stops adding air before the pump shuts off.

    There should be rubber 'feet' on the compressor mount to reduce noise. If your compressor is mounted on the filter, many other air pump systems mount the compressor on a wall bracket and that reduces noise.

    If you did/do the search I mentioned, you can call some of the results and learn more about compressors and how they are used for certain filter medias.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

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    DIY Junior Member mightymoose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey View Post
    If it is an exact replacement, why would it be any quieter than the original?
    The original is nearly 10 years old and exposed to the weather. The bearings and piston are worn.

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    DIY Junior Member mightymoose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    I'm no Culligan Man but maybe the compressor is slaved to the well pump or activated by a flow switch... I assume the compressor has gotten noisier over time and that a new one would be quieter.
    Exactly. I could rig something up, but I prefer to use the right parts. It is just easier that way... but when you don't have the specs of the part it does get a little complicated.

  13. #13
    DIY Junior Member mightymoose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    Many dealers, mostly independent dealers, sell the same system. Al the compressor does is add air to the mineral tank to maintain a head of sir for the raw water to fall through as it enters the filter. That increases the dissolved oxygen content of the water which helps certain media to do their job. The compressor has to run at a higher pressure than the well pump is able to produce and the pump and compressor come on at the cut in (start) pressure switch pressure that the pump's pressure switch is operated at. Usually the compressor runs when the pump runs but the compressor stops adding air before the pump shuts off.

    There should be rubber 'feet' on the compressor mount to reduce noise. If your compressor is mounted on the filter, many other air pump systems mount the compressor on a wall bracket and that reduces noise.

    If you did/do the search I mentioned, you can call some of the results and learn more about compressors and how they are used for certain filter medias.
    I am on the city water system. The Super S filter is used due to the heavy iron and sulfur content in the local water (mostly because of the sulfur).
    The compressor is mounted to the control valve on the top of the media tank. The compressor operates on a timer and switches on for 30 seconds every hour.
    Your suggestion did cause me to search with the word "pump" instead of compressor and that led to some alternatives. I haven't had any luck confirming the specs of the compressor on the system but have found a few compressors that seem to be in the range of those used on other systems. The one that I found that appears to be an exact physical match has to be special ordered from the factory. Culligan, of course, won't give me the information I need. I worry about using a compressor that could damage other parts.
    Anyway, I have narrowed it down to two. I can either hope the exact physical match is in fact the same pump with same specs, or I can use an alternative pump and rig it up a bit.
    I had hoped for a response here indicating that there was some standard regarding compressors on these filter systems but I guess there isn't.

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    In the Trades Akpsdvan's Avatar
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    There are 3 way of getting the air into a system.
    Like the old microdine way there was an micronizer to draw air into the system, then there was the up graded one that WaterSoft used and its little air release tank.
    There is the new AIO valve that is much like a softener with the air getting pulled in rather than brine.
    Then there is the air pump or compressor to pump air into either the tank with the media or a separate tank to hold air and water which is what Culligan has now done rather than the older style with the compressor on the back side of the control head.

    So now the other question that one must ask ,,,, how long before other parts of the old culligan go south as the pump has done?
    It might be time to look into replacing the system with some thing like the AIO on top a media to handle the iron and smell that you have.... no compressor , no bleach.....

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