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Thread: Propane tank, is it ready for work ?

  1. #16
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    That yellow thing is a plastic cap covering the POL fitting that has been removed from the tank so they could put the locking plug in the tank. The cap,keeps crap out of the gas line.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  2. #17
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Well, I reviewed the previous posts and find my question was invalid. Thanks to those who tried to help a dummy out.

  3. #18
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonL View Post
    When I had Propane they would fill my tank if I was not home and send me the bill.

    It is measured in gallons at time of delivery.

    The Yellow parts on that tank are not locks.

    A lock will normally be Red and should have a Tag saying why it is locked out.

    Tanks of that size are normally filled at your residence.


    Have Fun.
    Nope, when service is interrupted, say the owners move out and the house is up for sale, the gas company puts that silver colored lock in the tank and the plastic cap on the gas line fitting (they pull the line form the tank) they also do it when someone doesn't pay the bill. I know because I've been the guy doing it LOL. No red tags unless there is a safety issue with the equipment and even then not likely because the gas company will pull it.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  4. #19
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Sawyer View Post
    Nope, when service is interrupted, say the owners move out and the house is up for sale, the gas company puts that silver colored lock in the tank and the plastic cap on the gas line fitting (they pull the line form the tank) they also do it when someone doesn't pay the bill. I know because I've been the guy doing it LOL. No red tags unless there is a safety issue with the equipment and even then not likely because the gas company will pull it.

    In my area if your gas is turned off for any reason the gas company is required to inspect and re-light your pilots.

    Sounds like the OP needs to call the man.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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  5. #20
    DIY Member GG_Mass's Avatar
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    Okay now,
    Some updates:
    I had two main ideas from this thread:
    1. The tank is locked, call the Gas company to unlock it.
    2. The tank is not locked. Use the gas at your own risk.

    I called the gas company and they have no record of locking the tank, they, however, are more then happy to come & assist me, after I get obligated to them in a contract.
    The gas in the tank is mine, I bought it from the previous owner upon closing the deal on the house. I am reluctant about signing yet another contract, and if I can just use the gas (which I paid for) and then think about my steps, that'll be the best.
    To settle the score, I'll take another, more inclusive set of pictures, including from sides that have not taken yet, and post them.
    Along with the gas company stating they have no record of locking the tank and some replies on this thread, I'm tending towards thinking that it is not locked in any way. I will post images later on to help with this decision.
    Thank you.

  6. #21
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GG_Mass View Post
    Okay now,
    Some updates:
    I had two main ideas from this thread:
    1. The tank is locked, call the Gas company to unlock it.
    2. The tank is not locked. Use the gas at your own risk.

    I called the gas company and they have no record of locking the tank, they, however, are more then happy to come & assist me, after I get obligated to them in a contract.
    The gas in the tank is mine, I bought it from the previous owner upon closing the deal on the house. I am reluctant about signing yet another contract, and if I can just use the gas (which I paid for) and then think about my steps, that'll be the best.
    To settle the score, I'll take another, more inclusive set of pictures, including from sides that have not taken yet, and post them.
    Along with the gas company stating they have no record of locking the tank and some replies on this thread, I'm tending towards thinking that it is not locked in any way. I will post images later on to help with this decision.
    Thank you.

    If the tank was locked, You would not have been able to lift the lid.

    Your ON/OFF Valve Knob seems to be missing. Or it may use a Gas Valve Key.

    Can you take some better pictures , From all sides of the Tank Valve ?

    I agree that a contract is not good if they charge you a Maintenance Fee.

    I pay $15.00 a month for the Maintenance Fee, and use $5.00 worth of gas in the summer. And they maintain nothing on my property.

    Sometimes safety is worth paying for, Or you may not be around to pay for it.


    Good Luck.
    Last edited by DonL; 09-16-2013 at 07:23 AM.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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  7. #22
    DIY Member GG_Mass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonL View Post
    If the tank was locked, You would not have been able to lift the lid.

    Your ON/OFF Valve Knob seems to be missing. Or it may use a Gas Valve Key.

    Can you take some better pictures , From all sides of the Tank Valve ?

    I agree that a contract is not good if they charge you a Maintenance Fee.

    I pay $15.00 a month for the Maintenance Fee, and use $5.00 worth of gas in the summer. And they maintain nothing on my property.

    Sometimes safety is worth paying for, Or you may not be around to pay for it.
    Good Luck.
    I agree, If I was to consider the tank as years long worth service for me, I will sign a contact w/o any issues. However, I don't think I will use that tank, at this point, I would say I don't need it, but, it is there, and it is full of gas that I paid for.
    A contract is binding for three years, with rental fees for the tank and a 120$ /year obligation for gas purchase (no matter if you use it or not). I found out that I have natural gas in our street, and I'm going to scrap what money I have to have it run to our house and then for a plumber to distribute it to points needed around the house. I wish I could put the 205$ that I paid at closing for the propane, towards running the natural gas line !
    I will post better pictures , hopefully this evening.

  8. #23
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If the existing appliances are setup for propane, you MUST convert them to NG (if they make a kit for it), or you'll be very disappointed. If they do not make a new kit, they will be unusable on NG. NG uses both a different (lower) pressure regulator and a much bigger jet since per volume, it has less energy (thus the need for the larger jet along with the lower pressure). Those kits generally come with a new regulator and replacement jets, but could be much more involved. Once changed, the air/fuel mixture may need to be changed, especially if it does not contain a new burner, and only changes the jets. So, it's not just swapping the connection.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
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  9. #24
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GG_Mass View Post
    I agree, If I was to consider the tank as years long worth service for me, I will sign a contact w/o any issues. However, I don't think I will use that tank, at this point, I would say I don't need it, but, it is there, and it is full of gas that I paid for.
    A contract is binding for three years, with rental fees for the tank and a 120$ /year obligation for gas purchase (no matter if you use it or not). I found out that I have natural gas in our street, and I'm going to scrap what money I have to have it run to our house and then for a plumber to distribute it to points needed around the house. I wish I could put the 205$ that I paid at closing for the propane, towards running the natural gas line !
    I will post better pictures , hopefully this evening.

    You will need to change the orifice on your gas appliances if you change gas type.

    That tank that you have may be out of inspection date, and may need to be Tested or Replaced.

    I would buy a tank, Instead of renting one. You would need to pay to get it pressure tested every 10 Years, depends on the state law. Or just get a new tank.


    Good Luck.



    I doubled with you Jim. I am a slow typer. Is typer a word ? It is now.

    Good point that you made Jim.
    Last edited by DonL; 09-16-2013 at 09:55 AM.
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  10. #25
    DIY Member GG_Mass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    If the existing appliances are setup for propane, you MUST convert them to NG (if they make a kit for it), or you'll be very disappointed. If they do not make a new kit, they will be unusable on NG. NG uses both a different (lower) pressure regulator and a much bigger jet since per volume, it has less energy (thus the need for the larger jet along with the lower pressure). Those kits generally come with a new regulator and replacement jets, but could be much more involved. Once changed, the air/fuel mixture may need to be changed, especially if it does not contain a new burner, and only changes the jets. So, it's not just swapping the connection.
    Sadly/Happily , I only have a space hitter which uses the propane tank. My thoughts towards running gas to house are related to swapping the oil burner in my baseboard system to gas.

  11. #26
    DIY Member GG_Mass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Sawyer View Post
    Nope, when service is interrupted, say the owners move out and the house is up for sale, the gas company puts that silver colored lock in the tank and the plastic cap on the gas line fitting (they pull the line form the tank) they also do it when someone doesn't pay the bill. I know because I've been the guy doing it LOL. No red tags unless there is a safety issue with the equipment and even then not likely because the gas company will pull it.
    So are we all in agreement , as in - no need to post further pictures, the tank has been tampered by the gas company in order to prevent usage ?

  12. #27
    In the trades Dana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart View Post
    Dana, I really don't understand your answer. Let me give you an example of what I meant in my original question. I have a propane outdoor grill. The propane is stored in small canisters. When I run out of gas, I take the tank to a service station that sells propane. They fill the canister and the propane that goes into the tank is metered. I then pay for the gas. Another example. Many orchards in this area heat the orchards in cold spring nights with propane. This propane is stored in very large tanks. The following day, a propane delivery truck comes and refill the farmer's tank. He buys that propane that was delivered. In each of these cases, the propane that is delivered is bought and paid for. It is not metered as it is actually used. Thanks for your reply, maybe you can explain it so I can understand it.
    "It is not metered as it is actually used." I guess I don't really understand what do you MEAN by that?

    It's true that I don't actually understand what you mean by

    "The posts above imply that you are charged by the the amount of gas actually used."

    Really? Can you point to the text you think implies that, which might help me understand the question?

    Are you wondering about somehow metering it and charging as it comes out of your site-located tank?

    Or are you wondering if they're completely filling the tank?

    Are you talking about what the gauge on the tank actually indicates?

    I don't get the confusion.

    As with any other liquid fuel you pay by volume when you fill up, and rarely meter it with any precision as it comes out of the tank. The stuff is measured as a liquid, just as any other liquid. You pay for what they put into the tank, no more, no less, and the guy charging you has no idea whether, when, & how you used the tank previoiusly, only the volume that the tank can take-in from his metered dispensing equipment at the legal safe pressure.

    The cannisters are fitted gauges that work via the vapor pressure in the tank, not volume. Overfilling a tank is hazardous if there isn't at least some vapor bubble for the liquid propane to expand into as it's volume increases with temperature heating up in the sun, etc. If it were 100% full with liquid propane heating up in the sun could cause the cannister to burst. While it's physically possible to over-fill the tank, the gauge is there to let you know when you've hit the safe fill-pressure limit for the cannister for the fuel type, and when it's nearly empty. They are not super-precision instruments, and don't measure volume, only pressure.

  13. #28
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GG_Mass View Post
    So are we all in agreement , as in - no need to post further pictures, the tank has been tampered by the gas company in order to prevent usage ?


    If it has gas in it, and you have paid for it, Post pictures. No need for it to go to waste.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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  14. #29
    DIY Member GG_Mass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonL View Post
    If it has gas in it, and you have paid for it, Post pictures. No need for it to go to waste.
    Here's a picture, I think it's a good angel.
    Let's see if I'm getting this right. (I'm playing a bit dumb, A. Because I am, B. Because it may help other dummies that may read this thread one day. )
    Red-Area in question
    Gray- The parts that were placed by the gas company, and the silver round part is the one that needs a 'special tool' in order to be removed.
    Blue- The part that will eventually need to enter or 'connect' to the tank, after the parts in the gray are will be removed.

    True/False ?
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  15. #30
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    Grab hold of the thin copper tube and pull. It will move because the POL fitting has been removed from the tank valve and capped with that yellow plastic cap. The silver looking thing that is installed in the tank valve is the plug. You need a special key to remove it. The gas in the tank has been paid for by the previous owner but the tank is owned by the gas company and their contract allows them to keep you from using their tank without signing a contract with them so unless you do that you won't have access to the gas in their tank even though you paid for it. I hope that clears this up.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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