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Thread: Hot water baseboard system , questions.

  1. #16
    DIY Member GG_Mass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    The Beckett Heat Manager is actually a dumber version of the Intellicon 3250HW+, and was designed by the same people. Either will edge out a straight-ahead outdoor reset for net efficiency on oversized systems. The distinguishing characteristic of the Intellicon is that it can correctly deal with the differences between heating zone calls and calls for heat from the indirect hot water heater, and would be the appropriate retrofit unit for .....
    Can you think of (not 1 in a million) cases where an outdoor rest is favourable over a 3250HW unit ?
    I understand that the intellicon is a better choise than Beckett's product, is that in anyway reversble as well (meaning, no other csaes you can think of that it may be reversed ?)
    I'm leaving $ out of it completerly , purely technical arguments.

  2. #17
    In the trades Dana's Avatar
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    Sure- condensing gas boilers, where they get huge efficiency boosts out of ever-lower temps you'd want to use the outdoor reset function.

    With right-sized oil boilers and radiation such that the boiler needs to hit 220F under design conditions there may be a worthwhile boost in comfort using an outdoor reset control. That's probably only 1 in 100, not 1 in 1,000,000.

    Most of the time intelligent heat-purge economizers are the way to go for retrofits, especially on the 3x+ oversized behemoths typically found in MA homes. The average home in MA has a design-condition heat load between 45-50,000 BTU/hr, but as often as not the basement beastie-boiler is serving up 140,000 BTU/hr or more. It's often very difficult to convince homeowners at the time of boiler replacement that their true heat loads are as low as they really are, and most HVAC contractors have neither the time nor interest in convincing them to down-size. But there's a serious hit in efficiency when that happens, unless heat purge controls are part of the deal.

  3. #18
    Master Hot Water Mpls,MN BadgerBoilerMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    The Beckett Heat Manager is actually a dumber version of the Intellicon 3250HW+, and was designed by the same people. Either will edge out a straight-ahead outdoor reset for net efficiency on oversized systems. The distinguishing characteristic of the Intellicon is that it can correctly deal with the differences between heating zone calls and calls for heat from the indirect hot water heater, and would be the appropriate retrofit unit for you.

    Most of the time the radiation on oversized systems is capable of delivering the average winter heat load at water temperatures below the temperatures at which the boiler can operate without destructive condensation in the flue (or heat exchangers on the boiler, for boilers that aren't cold-start tolerant), so the with outdoor reset the temperature curve spends 90% or more of the time flat, at the safe low-limit, and unless it's allowed to rise to a higher limit, results in a greater number of cycles. Efficiency is still pretty good, in some cases as good as the Intellicon, and the room temperature overshoots are somewhat (but only somewhat) better managed. If you wanted to manage the comfort levels with outdoor reset using a an reset controlled thermostatic mixing valve is nicer to the boiler and can run at lower radiation temps than you'd be able to run the boiler, but that's a bigger system-design hack than just adding smarter boiler controls. (A boiler-control outdoor reset or an Intellicon does not require any plumbing.)
    Kudos Dana.
    I could use another good boiler tech:-).

    MA

  4. #19
    DIY Member GG_Mass's Avatar
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    BTW,
    This is not an extremely old boiler, am I right ? At first I thought it's a very old one, and then I looked it up online and found this :
    http://www.ecrinternational.com/secu...ument/1089.pdf
    It looks exactly like mine. Unless this is a model that runs for 30 years now..
    Asking, just in case anyone knows the age range of 'The Ultimate'.
    Thank you.

  5. #20
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    It very well could be 30 years old. Ultimate hasn't made a whole lot of big changes to their boilers. If you can read the plate, the serial number will give you the age.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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