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Thread: Thoroughly boggled

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    Question Thoroughly boggled

    Okay, I want a Toto, , I'm pretty sure. We are re-doing the bathroom and I like the way the Aquia looks but I also like the Cyclonic flush of a Vespin. (need a good flush for large droppings) Here is our problem(s) Our bathroom is a Very small Farmhouse bathroom. The place was built in the early 1900's and I think this was a closet to begin with. The water supply comes up from the floor and is about 3.5 inches away from the wall and perhaps 6 maybe 7 inches from middle. It is a 12 inch connection. We need a taller pot as We are pushing 65-70 and pretty sore jointed. We are on a well with low household water pressure. Anything larger than 27 inches out from the wall will have our knees in the sink and butts in the shower. Will the Vespin or Aquia fit with those parameters? I am counting on one or the other. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Fiber flinger

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    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    Well, the Universal Height (taller) Aquia is model CST412MF in the two-piece version. The spec sheet shows the width of the porcelain base as 5" either side of center, so it's possible the supply coming from the floor could fit, depending upon its width and where it really comes from. You might need to pull the valve off the top of the water supply and replace it with something like this Dahl mini-ball valve so the handle doesn't bang against the porcelain: http://www.dahlvalve.com/PDF/Skirted..._Brchre_US.pdf
    That same toilet is 27.5 inches long, and sits about 3/4" off the wall, so you are looking at 28.25 from the wall to the front of the bowl. Hopefully that will do it.

    The Vespin II is 28-5/16 long, plus 3/4" off the wall, so you are looking at 29-1/16" from the wall to the front of the bowl. It's also wider than the Aquia, about 6" either side of center on the base, so your supply might not fit, although more precise measurements would be surer.

    Terry has had good success with the Aquia and its washdown flush. People generally like the toilet, although it does have a smaller water spot than the Double-Cyclone toilets. However, it dumps a lot more water into the top of the bowl, which apparently compensates for some of the waste landing on the porcelain.

    I assume that you have measured your rough-in, and that it's a standard 12 inches?

    If neither of these do it for you, I can suggest some other Totos that come in a round version that is shorter. Because the seating position on a round and an elongated is basically the same (there's just more bowl in front of you), it may be that the Aquia would still have a good sitting position for you, even though it's about an inch more than you wanted.
    Last edited by wjcandee; 08-07-2013 at 01:35 PM.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Water pressure is not a factor. Actually, your problem is most likely not "pressure" but flow. I'm guessing a bit here, but it is quite likely your plumbing is galvanized steel pipes which were used for many years before copper pipes came into vogue. The problem with galvanized pipes is since there are made of steel, they will corrode on the inside. Overtime, this builds up and extremely reduces the carrying capacity of the pipe which mean the flow (gallons per minute) is severely reduced. Now all of that does not affect the toilet other than it may require a bit longer refill time after a flush. Since low flow toilets only require a fraction of the volume of water the old ones needed, fill time is cut way down as well. As far as the toilet choice is concerned, wjcandee has covered that very well.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Most toilet fill valves need 15-20psi to work...low by American standards is well within any normal, gravity flush toilet's capabilities. Now, a pressure-assisted toilet may not work well with really low pressure, but that's another story.

    As Gary said, an elongated is only a problem if a door gets in the way...you straddle it, so your knees are in the same position as if it were a round-front toilet.
    Jim DeBruycker
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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Thank you for the quick responses. Looks like the Aquia will probably be the one.

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    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    The pleasure is ours. Let us know how it goes.

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    Oh, boy, I found the Nexus.

    Aquia vs. Nexus now. We have a clogging problem and I can't help but wonder if one is better than the other for such things. Since the house is soooo old I wonder somethimes if the flow from the toilet to the Septic is too flat horizontally. Also which is taller? (need the height) Don't forget the depth problem also. Shorter is better. Can any of you talk me out of one of them.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    According to Terry's Toilet Review, the Aquia is 15-1/4" floor to bowl rim. The Nexus is Universal Height, 16-1/8", floor to bowl rim. Seats will add to the actual height. Based on the rough-in at exacty 12", the Aquia takes up 27-1/4" from the back wall. The Nexus uses 28" from the back wall. Drains need at least 1/4" slope per foot to properly drain. Less slope may work, but can easily clog. Of course, there should be no low spots along the run.
    Last edited by Gary Swart; 08-10-2013 at 02:08 PM.

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    For both of them?

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiberfling View Post
    For both of them?
    Not sure exactly what you're asking here, but plumbing drain lines need 1/4" per foot to pass code...it's not specific to a toilet, a tub, a sink, or whatever. Anything less, can have problems, especially if there are flat sections, and reverse slopes never work for the long term. Larger pipe can sometimes get by with a shallower slope, but for those sizes typically used in a home, 1/4" per foot is what's called for.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    There is a Universal Height Aquia, CST412MF. It is 16.125" from floor to lip of bowl.

    When you say you have a "clogging problem", do you mean the toilet clogs? Or do you mean your pipes clog and they have to remove the toilet to snake those lines? If you can resolve it with a plunger locally, it probably has little to do with the slope of your main drain pipes.

    One advantage of the Nexus is that its spec sheet calls for the water supply to be 4" left of the centerline, so you likely will have no problems with the location of your current supply. CST794EF (or CST794SF in the 1.6gpf version). The Nexus uses a flush similar to the original Drake, which has a great flush, but less bowl rinse than the Aquia.
    Last edited by wjcandee; 08-10-2013 at 04:54 PM.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    What is unclear about what I wrote. Actually, your question is unclear, I have no idea what you can be questioning. "For both" what? I gave the spec figures for the Aquia and Nexus toilets as found in Terry's Review. The 1/4" slope on drains is Code for all drains.

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    I ordered the Nexus today. Hubby liked the idea of a taller pot with the water supply 4 inches left of center. On now to the quarter round shower.

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