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Thread: Condensate draining

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member
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    Default Condensate draining

    I am going to be installing a weil-mclain ultra-80 gas boiler and have worked out all the issues except how to deal with the condensate. I have a 1920's twin with cast iron DWV and no drain in the basement. Any suggestions on how to get rid of the condensate from the boiler?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If you haven't got someplace to gravity drain the stuff, then you'll need a condensate pump. This could go to the washing machine drain, if it has enough slope, or could be pumped there with the pump.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
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    Default More info

    I don't have a place to gravity drain it, and my wahing machine is on the 1st floor. Does this mean I am going to have to cut into the cast iron pipe and install a drain trap, etc?

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    DIY Senior Member finnegan's Avatar
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    You can cut into the case iron or just pump it outside.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Pumping outside in freezing weather is often not a good solution...you could pump it upstairs to the washing machine standpipe, or you'd have to make a connection into the sewer someplace convenient (is that an oxymoron?).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Plumber plumber1's Avatar
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    Default boiler

    I'm not sure exactly what you mean, but why cant you drain the steam line gravity back to the bottom of the the boiler?

    Guess I don't know what: twin with cast iron DWV....is.

    What did the old boiler do with condensate?

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    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    There are lots of little condensate pumps that will pump through a flexible tube or anything else to get rid of 20 gallons per hour against 15 ft of head. They cost in the range of $40 to $60.

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    So I should get a condensate pump, and then just tap it into the cast iron sewer pipe? Do I need to install a trap for that, or just punch a hole big enough for the tube from the pump to fit in and then seal it off with caulk?

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The high efficiency boilers (and furnaces) cool the exhaust so much that the water component of combustion condenses...it needs to be disposed of. Punching a hole in the drain is not goingto cut it...you'd probably need a trap, but since it is being pumped, I'm not sure if you need a vent. One of the pros will have some ideas on what meets code, and what would be the easiest. If you could pump it to your washing machine stand pipe, it might be the easiest, even if it is on the floor above.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Plumber/Gasfitter dubldare's Avatar
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    All traps require vents. All connections to the sanitary sewer system require traps.

    Simple logic would deduce that a trap receiving 'pumped' discharge would need venting much more than semi-continuous low volume discharge: higher discharge velocity makes for a greater siphon than a semi-continuous drip.

    If the pipe you plan on attatching to receives waste from above, you most definately need a vent.

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    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    You're looking at a trickle of water. Can you find a way to put a 3/8" Tygon tube into the top of a toilet tank, or into the same drain that a washing machine discharges to, or a laundry sink? If you have a sump pump you can dump it into the sump. I would do everything possible to avoid making it a plumbing project.

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    DIY Senior Member finnegan's Avatar
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    Many inspectors will allow you to just drill a hole in a cleanout and insert the condensate tube. I know that is not an option for you here, but it is an example of how inspectors will often tolerate creativity with condensate pumps. As far as a trap, code would require a vent, including an AAD, but the pump would work with no trouble without the vent. It really is not a large volume of water. The way traps are constructed for these pumps is usually to use a 1 1/2" trap and then a 2" - 1 1/2" reducer fitting so that the 2" side is up. The condensate pump tube is hung above the bell so that it drips in and creates an air gap to avoid a siphon effect. I still say the easiest way is to just pump it outside. As long as you are not running it onto a sidewalk or your driveway, you should have no trouble.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The block of ice could be pretty messy, but if you can live with that, it may be the easiest. The colder it is, the bigger it will be and the more chance of it freezing up. Hassle is, if you run it away from the foundation, it might freeze up. If you don't, you might end up with some of it back in the basement.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  14. #14
    Plumber/Gasfitter dubldare's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by finnegan
    Many inspectors will allow you to just drill a hole in a cleanout and insert the condensate tube. I know that is not an option for you here, but it is an example of how inspectors will often tolerate creativity with condensate pumps.

    Show me an inspector, properly schooled in the ways of plumbing, who would allow that.

    While yes, it may be creative, it is most definately not sanitary.

    How detrimental may such a use be is unknown, but it is most definately not sanitary. Such talk/advise should not be allowed.

  15. #15
    DIY Senior Member finnegan's Avatar
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    It has worked in Northern NJ. I don't ask for an inspector's education background, just if he is ok with it.

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