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Thread: Primary Loop on a condensing-style direct vent boiler

  1. #1
    DIY Member philtrap's Avatar
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    Question Primary Loop on a condensing-style direct vent boiler

    Hi folks - I'm a first time poster and thanks in advance for your input...

    I'm installing a Triangular Tube Prestige Solo (PT110) boiler and have 2 questions...

    1) Is there minimum length of pipe from the boiler where the primary loop ends? I mean, can I place the closely spaced tees sic inches from the boiler, or is it better to make a larger loop so there is more flow and water running thru the primary loop?

    2) The boiler has 1" fittings and my piping is 3/4". Where is the best place to step down to 3/4"? Would it be OK to go directly from the 1" stubs on the boiler to 3/4" with a step 1" to 3/4" fitting or should I run 1" pipe for a while or maybe to the closely spaced tees?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    You should read the installation instructions. You absolutely cannot reduce the primary inlet/outlet or the primary piping to 3/4" It appears that you do not have an understanding of hydronic theory. It would be a shame to spend all that money and time and then have to tear it all out and do it all over again. You should find a competent technician and have the job done right.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    DIY Member philtrap's Avatar
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    Thanks Tom. I do understand that the primary loop must be 1". I asked the question before finishing the directions and from looking at the way the oil boiler was installed (with 1-1/4" boiler in/outs to eventually 3/4") I was just thinking of an easier way of doing it with all the 3/4" supplies I have. I do understand hydraulics and thermodynamics and have taken classes in these subjects too. My main question is in reference to question #1 which the directions does not address. Do you know if there is an optimum length for the primary loop with the closely spaced tees. I can place the tees 12 inches from the boiler, or would, say, 4 feet be better. Would the four feet create too much heat loss and the opposite hold true for the 12" length.

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    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philtrap View Post
    Thanks Tom. I do understand that the primary loop must be 1". I asked the question before finishing the directions and from looking at the way the oil boiler was installed (with 1-1/4" boiler in/outs to eventually 3/4") I was just thinking of an easier way of doing it with all the 3/4" supplies I have. I do understand hydraulics and thermodynamics and have taken classes in these subjects too. My main question is in reference to question #1 which the directions does not address. Do you know if there is an optimum length for the primary loop with the closely spaced tees. I can place the tees 12 inches from the boiler, or would, say, 4 feet be better. Would the four feet create too much heat loss and the opposite hold true for the 12" length.
    Why would 4' create too much "heat loss"?
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    DIY Member philtrap's Avatar
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    I'm just asking if there is an optimal length. I know if it was 1,000 feet away it wouldn't be good and if the tees were right at the in/out of the boiler it probably wouldn't be good either.

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    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    Quote; I do understand hydraulics and thermodynamics and have taken classes in these subjects too.

    So you should know the answer then.

    www.heatinghelp.com Buy Dan Holohans's book
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    DIY Member philtrap's Avatar
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    Tom - You're a Sweetheart. I came on this forum to get help. It's a DIY forum. Even your title is "DIY Senior Member" I don't know why you can't answer a simple question with a simple answer rather than trying to berate me. I'm a licensed PE in 3 states and do all my home improvement work myself. I took on this project since it's the summer and I have 5 months to get it done. I know how to solder, wire and do simple projects like this. I took these classes I mentioned over 10 years ago and I'm sure you don't remember every tidbit of information you have learned. I asked 3 simple questions on this forum and you have done nothing but comment rudely for a DIY forum where people come for answers. My neighbor is an HVAC Contractor and he is going to sign off on my project. I'm trying not to bother him with questions like these, but I guess I'm going to have to since this forum sucks with not answering simple questions. Go Love yourself and your family.
    Last edited by philtrap; 06-22-2013 at 06:15 PM. Reason: Tom's not so bad of a guy, just misunderstood

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    DIY Member philtrap's Avatar
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    PS - I just got off the phone with Tech Support for Triangular Tube and the guy answered my questions in less than 1 minute. Thanks for Nothing Tom. I hope you're a proud Sr. Forum Man. Die

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    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    Ah, so since its a DIY forum that means you are entitled to free advice even when it's obvious that you don't have the requisite knowledge to even contemplate installing condensing gas equipment so I should as you put it DIE. Well, just because I feel that it's important to keep the ignorant from doing just that and perhaps killing their family and loved ones as well I shall now give you the best advice you are likely to get here or anywhere else for that matter. Call a licensed gas appliance installer.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    DIY Member philtrap's Avatar
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    I guess you didn't read the part "My neighbor is an HVAC Contractor and he is going to sign off on my project". He is a licensed installer. He knows my talent and skills and is very confident that I can do the job. If I make a mistake, he will not let me fire it up until it's 100% correct. He is going to check everything BEFORE any water is filled in the system or the gas is turned on. Being he is so kind, I'm trying to not bother him so much with the simple questions that I thought would be kindly answered. Some of them have been by others in this forum, but not by you. And yes, these forums are normally for free advise, but I guess you are just a plumber who thinks he is above everyone one else.

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    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    Do a search for "my neighbor is an hvac technician or plumber" within this site and see how many hits you get. Seems like a whole lot of folks live next to tradesmen LOL
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    Sprinkler Guy Wet_Boots's Avatar
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    Or, to borrow from the fictional character, "you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a neighbor/relative/tradesman who will make sure everything's right"

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    DIY Member philtrap's Avatar
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    I would never fire it up without having a licensed installer (my Neighbor) look it over and sign off on it. I'm not that crazy and I don't want any problems or accidents. I'm just trying to save money by doing something I am fully capable to do. It's not rocket science.

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    Sprinkler Guy Wet_Boots's Avatar
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    It never is rocket science, yet something can easily get overlooked.

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    DIY Member philtrap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wet_Boots View Post
    It never is rocket science, yet something can easily get overlooked.
    Very True and that's why I'm asking questions, making calls to technical support, following the piping diagram in the manual, and all of the manuals recommendations and warnings and having a licensed installer double check me. Once I finish, I'll post photo's to prove my pure talent of great workmanship.

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