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Thread: Toto Drake toilet product review

  1. #316
    DIY Senior Member Reach4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lego View Post
    Does Toto make a similarly sized tank that's slightly wider but slightly shorter to fit under a 30" tall countertop? I'd like to buy 2 more for our new (to us) house.
    If you put a tank under a counter, you are going to prevent essential access, unless that counter is liftable.

  2. #317
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    The Eco Drake would have a ST743E tank.

    Eco Drake, CST744EL, 30-1/2" high
    Drake II, CST454CEFG, 30" high
    Ultramax II, MS604114CEFG, 28-3/4" high
    Supreme ADA, MS864114L, 25-1/2" high

  3. #318
    DIY Junior Member Lego's Avatar
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    wjcandee & Terry, thanks. I've narrowed down my choices to an Ultramax II. Seems to have good ratings - I was able to get a local quote down to $445 CDN for it.

    Terry, next time we pass through Bothell I'll be sure to drop by and say hi.

  4. #319
    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lego View Post
    wjcandee & Terry, thanks. I've narrowed down my choices to an Ultramax II. Seems to have good ratings - I was able to get a local quote down to $445 CDN for it.

    Terry, next time we pass through Bothell I'll be sure to drop by and say hi.
    You got a great deal and you will love the toilet. We have the skirted version, called the Carlyle II. Essentially the same toilet only skirted (needed to do that b/c of non-standard rough-in distance; the Carlyle II will fit on a 10", 12" or 14" rough-in, whereas the Ultramax II will fit on the overwhelmingly-standard 12"). Anyway, it's a great unit to look at and a great unit to use. Come on back with your comments once you have it installed.

  5. #320
    DIY Junior Member Rocky03's Avatar
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    Just installed the Toto Eco Drake CST744E (1.28Gpf) toilet for our master bedroom. Works great as advertised. We had two toilets replaced in our house this week. I also go the Kohler Santa Rosa 1.28Gpf ADA and installed in the same week.

    Between the two, we like the Eco Drake NON-ada toilet much better. Not sure why people are raving reviews about the ADA toilets. Unless you're 6ft or taller, then an ADA toilet is for your. I'm 5.10 and I find my feet just touches the floor. My wife is shorter and prefers the lower height toilets.

    However, I like the flushing mechanism in the newer Kohler canister flushing system. The flushing lever is much more easier to press and it comes back down without the "thud" noise. Not sure how reliable this system is in the long run though.

    The Eco Drake is your traditional flapper type. It takes a little bit more effort vs the Kohler as you are actually lifting the flapper valve with the weight of the water pressure from the tank (like we've been doing for ages). The Kohler one, it's really easy to activate the lift of the canister inside the tank (kids will like that).

    As for flushing performance, the Drake appears to flush better than the Kohler but not by much. The Kohler does a pretty good job too.

    If I had to rate between the two (10 being the better of the two) ...

    Flush performance:
    Drake: 10
    Kohler: 8.5

    Flush noise (the Drake exhibits a "thud" noise when the flapper comes back down after you press the lever)
    Drake: 10
    Kohler: 8.5

    Flush lever effort:
    Kohler: 10
    Drake: 7

    We have one more room to do and we'll probably go for the Kohler Santa Rosa 1.6Gpf since this is the only non-ADA toilet they sell. We'll sacrifice the flushing power over the ease of flushing lever.
    Last edited by Rocky03; 03-04-2014 at 08:08 AM.

  6. #321
    DIY Member Wallijonn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AstroProf View Post
    ... we are having *serious* problems with leaks. ... the leak seems to be coming from the right
    bolt (as you face the toilet), and it's consistently from the same spot, throughout this whole process.
    I thought the same thing, that since water was dripping from the right bolt thread that that was where the leak was. When I looked at the tank to bowl gasket, on the back, I could see water puddled between the tank and bowl porcelain. The Korky tank to bowl gasket kit, #481BP fixed that. The 481BP gasket is red instead of black, is firmer and slightly thicker. I was not able to tighten down the tank bolts to where the tank made contact at all three points. There is now a small gap at all three points. I just tightened the tank bolts until the tank no longer rocked back and forth, to where it felt solid and substantial.

    Last edited by Wallijonn; 04-13-2014 at 10:05 AM.

  7. #322
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The most common source of tank leaking with a new toilet is incorrect assembly of the parts. If you have a metal washer inside the tank under the head of the bolt, it is very likely to leak. The correct assembly here is very important, and an extra 10-seconds of attention can make a huge difference. First, before inserting the bolt, take some fine sandpaper and smooth down the porcelain around the hole...only takes a few swipes back and forth. THen, with a new washer under the head, drop it down the hole. Take a washer and nut and then tighten the bolt to the tank. This will make a waterproof seal, independent of how tight you get the tank to the bowl. THen, place the tank on the bowl with the spud washer around the tank's outlet (some of them have a notch in them...make sure it is fully seated properly), and with a second set of washers and nuts, attach the tank to the bowl. If you only use one set of nuts and washers, you do not have any primary seal. If you put a washer underneath the head of the bolt, it will almost always leak, maybe not immediately, but eventually.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #323
    DIY Member Wallijonn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    If you have a metal washer inside the tank under the head of the bolt, it is very likely to leak.
    Check. The bolt head is usually wide enough that a metal washer isn't needed.

    Then, with a new washer under the head, drop it down the hole.
    Huh? I thought you just said not to use a washer under the bolt head? Oh, you mean the "rubber washer". Check. I call that a "gasket".

    Then, place the tank on the bowl with the "spud" washer around the tank's outlet ... and with a second set of washers and nuts, attach the tank to the bowl.
    The "spud washer" is the big rubber/foam washer. Got it.

    When I install the other Drake I might see if the tip for coating the spud washer with Plumber's 100% Pure Silicone will prevent a leak. That time around I will have a Channel Lock wrench at the ready to make sure the plastic flange nut is tight. I just can't see why the factory wouldn't use a torque wrench tool to accurately tighten the flange nut each and every time. Or I might just go ahead and replace the spud washer with the one in the #481BP kit from the "get-go".
    Last edited by Wallijonn; 04-14-2014 at 08:30 AM.

  9. #324
    DIY Member Wallijonn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky03 View Post
    Not sure why people are raving reviews about the ADA toilets. Unless you're 6ft or taller, then an ADA toilet is [not] for your. I'm 5.10 and I find my feet just touches the floor. My wife is shorter and prefers the lower height toilets.
    Hope you never get arthritis in the knees. Or when you get older you don't need a walker, or cane, to get around. Or a bad back. If you had any of those you would probably appreciate an ADA height toilet more.

    Since your feet just touch the floor, try a plastic toilet seat since they typically run about 1/2" thick instead of the 1" of wood.

  10. #325
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    There's also an issue with the water level; it's lower (from the seat) than in the "normal" toilets. This is very noticeable for some of us, particularly when half awake, sitting down in the middle of the night.

  11. #326
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    One thing to consider is that an ADA height toilet is still lower than most kitchen/dining room chairs.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  12. #327
    DIY Member Wallijonn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey View Post
    There's also an issue with the water level; it's lower (from the seat) than in the "normal" toilets. This is very noticeable for some of us, particularly when half awake, sitting down in the middle of the night.
    I don't understand. I figure if one "plops" that the increased distance will minimize any upward water splash. You want to know what drove me crazy? When the lid was down or when the seat was up. I'd forget to put the seat down and I'd feel as if I were falling when I went to sit while half awake. Or the wife would put the lid down and when I went to sit I'd feel the cold of the lid. Like many guys I would leave the seat up. It drove the wife crazy. Ah, marriage...

  13. #328
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wallijonn View Post
    I don't understand. I figure if one "plops" that the increased distance will minimize any upward water splash. You want to know what drove me crazy? When the lid was down or when the seat was up. I'd forget to put the seat down and I'd feel as if I were falling when I went to sit while half awake. Or the wife would put the lid down and when I went to sit I'd feel the cold of the lid. Like many guys I would leave the seat up. It drove the wife crazy. Ah, marriage...
    Plopping isn't the only problem, but as you probably know, the water can splash up higher than the poop plopped down. I haven't done any extreme high-altitude plopping to see if there is a limit, but that's certainly true for every toilet I've ever sat on. I've never experienced it in a porta-potty (thank Zeus), though, so there may be a limit.

    The other problem is the hangy-down-to-the-water problem, which is of course unrelated to plopping, and much more of a surprise at 2AM. At least you can compensate for that by squatting or standing, but the latter is risky in the dark, and the former is too much exercise at 2AM, when you want to stay as close to asleep as possible.

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