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Thread: What is considered plumbing rough-in?

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    DIY Member MushCreek's Avatar
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    Default What is considered plumbing rough-in?

    Sorry to ask so many questions, but I really appreciate the help! My next inspection is plumbing rough-in, and I was wondering if there is a generally accepted definition. When I did my barn, they inspected the under slab work, but by the time I had the plumbing rough-in, everything was done and in use. They seemed to be fine with that. They never called for a pressure test or anything. I would think the house would be a tougher inspection, but you never know. I would think it would include supply lines to the individual shut-offs at the fixtures, the DWV system would be complete, but no fixtures such as sinks or toilets. Would you install the toilet flanges, or just leave a capped pipe sticking up? I figure the sink drains would just stub out of the wall with caps glued on. What about the shower? Do I connect the DWV to the septic system yet, or after pressure testing? It's hard to get them on the phone to get answers. Any ideas? Thanks!

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Normally the DWV test is with everything capped and the system filled with water. A test cookie on the end on the pipe that extends through the foundation, or a test wye of tee with a test plug that can be removed.
    The shower pan is may be installed with a test cap in the drain.

    If it was a ground work only, I would have a 10 foot riser and fill that with water to the top. The inspector would come by and shake that pipe to make sure it was full.

    The water supply is with stub outs that are capped. I typically put a water heater flex at the WH rough and use that to fill the hot side.
    Shower head standpipes are capped and tested. Some places require a hydro-static test on new construction for the water.

    A finish inspection is with all fixtures installed, caulked and usable. It is at this time that the individual shutoffs are installed. No sense having them there before drywall and painting.

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    DIY Member MushCreek's Avatar
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    Thanks, Terry! The ground work has been tested (air) already. How do you fill the DWV with water? My roof is rather slick metal; I'd have to pay someone else to go up there if I was going to fill it from the vent. Could I install a test wye in the attic area to fill it? My ceilings are almost 10', so I could get a 10' head without going up on the roof.

    Should I have the WH in place? I assume the WH drain would be part of the rough inspection.

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    Plumbing Contractor for 49 years johnjh2o1's Avatar
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    We would use a winged test plug with a hose fitting attached to the end.
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    John

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    I use a 2x1/2" bushing screwed into a "test tee" with a hose valve screwed into it. Attach a hose, open the valve, turn on the water, turn off the water when water starts running off the roof. As for the "rough in" in can either be just the underfloor piping, with the above floor later as a "top out inspection" and then the final. Or it can be all the inside the wall piping. It depends on how the building is constructed and how much you can do at any one stage.
    Last edited by hj; 05-07-2013 at 03:44 PM.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    DIY Member MushCreek's Avatar
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    Our building department is grossly understaffed, so they have combined rough framing, rough electric, and rough plumbing into one inspection. I have to have ALL of that ready at the same time. It's amazing; my last inspection was pre-slab; since then I have built the basement and main floor walls, the main floor deck, and the entire roof structure. They don't inspect sheathing, so the roof can be completely finished, as can the exterior siding, doors, and windows. The entire shell of the house will be finished before the next inspection. My experience thus far is that they do a 30 second cursory look-around, and then sign off on it. That's why I'm doing so much research on proper methods, because I know mistakes likely won't get caught in inspection.

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    DIY Senior Member asktom's Avatar
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    Until a few years ago, where I am in Montana, if you were outside city limits the only permits and inspections were for wells and septic systems. Every thing else you were on your own.

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