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Thread: Gerberit Wall Hung Toilet Rough-In

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Johnny2's Avatar
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    Default Gerberit Wall Hung Toilet Rough-In

    Hi,

    I've done several plumbing projects, but up to this point they've been all fairly straight forward in terms of drain layout and venting. This time, I am trying to plumb a wall hung toilet and I need HELP! I will be building a new 2x6 wall in front of an existing frame wall where the plumbing stack is already located. The toilet drain line will be located within a few inches of the existing plumbing stack. Because of that, the toilet drain line will need to bend away from the stack in order to get far enough away so that it can turn back toward the stack and connect to it with a sanitary tee. In addition, the line will need to be vented to an existing vent line. I've attached a diagram of how I think this might be done, but would welcome any guidance from those of you who are more experienced. I am under the 2009 UPC.

    Thank you for your help.
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    Plumbing Contractor for 49 years johnjh2o1's Avatar
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    Change the sanitary tee to a Y and 45 and your good.

    John

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    DIY Junior Member Johnny2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnjh2o1 View Post
    Change the sanitary tee to a Y and 45 and your good.

    John
    John,

    Thank you for your reply. Do you mean like this:

    Name:  wall hung rough-in 2.jpg
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    or like this:

    Name:  wall hung rough-in 3.jpg
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  4. #4
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Sort of. Without being there it's hard to tell. Normally we use as few of the fittings as possible.
    You can use a street 45 into the wye, or a standard 45 if you need more offset. I would avoid adding a 90 if that is possible.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    A street 45 into the bottom Y would probably avoid having to offset back again. you do know what a street 45 is, don't you?
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    DIY Junior Member Johnny2's Avatar
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    Terry and hj,

    In my last post I had 2 images. Would either of them work from a code perspective? Based on Terry's comment, I assume that the first image would be the way to go, as it eliminates the 90. I could also use a few street 45's to pull everything up a bit and eliminate some of the offset, hj .

    I guess my main confusion is that the UPC divides everything into either vertical or horizontal drain lines, and defines what pieces to use to connect between each of them. All the plumbing I've done to this point has fit neatly into these definitions where a horizontal trap arm runs into a vertical stack via a sanitary tee....etc. In this situation, however, it seems most appropriate to use all vertical drain lines to keep things compact and to keep bends at a minimum. From what you are telling me, a Y is an appropriate connection between vertical drain lines.

    So, to summarize, this system has 4 parts, all of which are vertical:

    1. A vertical trap arm (with a 45 degree offset) from the toilet down to the branch drain. It enters the branch drain via a Y, and is vented below the toilet weir (which is o.k. per the UPC).
    2. A vent above this Y.
    3. A vertical branch drain below this Y.
    4. The main building drain which is also vertical (at least this section of it is).

    Do I understand this correctly?

    I am not a plumbing professional (that's why I am asking for help here ), so I apologize for any confusion.

    John
    Last edited by Johnny2; 04-21-2013 at 02:02 PM.

  7. #7
    Plumber Winslow's Avatar
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    Either way you first diagramed it will work. No need to use a wye on the stack. If you don't have that much room underneath then bring the line up to the left of the toilet, put a heel outlet above the floor and turn the 90 on the toilet to the left.

  8. #8
    DIY Junior Member Johnny2's Avatar
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    Winslow, sounds good. Thank you everyone for your assistance! I am going to get started now!

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