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Thread: Septic Tank Problem

  1. #16
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm747 View Post
    ...It pulls from the septic tank.
    I highly doubt it can actually pull from your tank. The discharge on a conventional tank is near the top so your tank has to use gravity to send it downstream to the pump.

    If your tank suffered from neglect and plugged the discharge, I would think that it would be your responsibility to fix the source of the blockage before the actual blockage is removed.

    Also, I would expect that the blockage would be snaked or jetted out from your tank unless there is a distribution box somewhere closer to the blockage. None the less, the source of the blockage needs to be addressed first, otherwise it is likely to block again.

    The vacuum line on the pumper can be loosely coupled onto the discharge port to try and suck it back but extreme care must be taken not to collapse the line.

  2. #17
    DIY Junior Member jrm747's Avatar
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    ok, Thats just what we were told. They said it pumps from our tanks. Its a weird set up to me. I guess I will have it pumped and go from there. May get someone to look at it because I have no idea what the system looks like once it leaves the tank. Thanks

  3. #18
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Often there may be a Tee protruding into the tank on the discharge port. Other times it is a baffle formed into the tank structure. If it is a Tee, plug the bottom of it with a toilet plunger or a test plug and run water into the top of the Tee to see if the discharge is plugged. If it is, then it needs to be snaked or scoped.

  4. #19
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm747 View Post
    ok, Thats just what we were told. They said it pumps from our tanks. Its a weird set up to me. I guess I will have it pumped and go from there. May get someone to look at it because I have no idea what the system looks like once it leaves the tank. Thanks

    You probable have a bad pump in Tank #2. Tank #1 will have solids.

    Systems that close to each other can not use field line so they normally chlorinate the water in tank #2 or #3 on 3 tank systems, and water the grass with the water.

    In your case the pump should be pumping from the last tank into the city sewer.

    The pump in your tank should have a high water level switch, that turns it on when the level gets high.

    You may want to check the breaker that feeds the pump, and determine why the pump is not running / Pumping.


    Good Luck
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  5. #20
    DIY Senior Member CanOfWorms's Avatar
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    Conjecture..!!??
    Try head in the sand?
    There is no law against him giving you the run-around.
    If there was a law against it all insurance companies would be guilty.
    He's not going to spend money unless he has to.

    That being said.
    Get it pumped and be there when you do. Ask the guy who pumps it how much solids there are.
    If it is all water its the system. If it is all solids you needed to get it pumped.

    If it was installed incorrectly you likely have no legal recourse after 10 years.

    Another thing!!!
    If there is water 2-3 feet down and you pump the tank dry there is a chance it will float if you get a heavy rain fall. I used to live in a flood zone and thats what the installer told me. "If you get this pumped dry and it floods before it fills with water it may float"
    Ask the pumper guy.
    It seems to me that the tank should always have water up level of the outlet line.

  6. #21
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    The tanks can float if they are left with no water in them.

    I would not let them pump with their truck on the driveway, unless it has a thick slab. The weight can crack the drive. Most of the pump trucks will stay on the road.

    Adding rid-x is a good thing after you get it pumped out.
    Last edited by DonL; 04-14-2013 at 03:49 PM.
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