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Thread: Gap between shower pan and studs

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Bratan's Avatar
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    Question Gap between shower pan and studs

    Looking for an advise
    I'm installing 4 piece pre-made shower (pan, back wall, side walls) and there's a big gap of 1-1/2" between back wall studs and shower pan
    What would be the best way to breach the gap, extend studs? 2-3 layer of 1/2" backerboard or some kind of long wood planks (parallel to the floor)? Some other option?
    Single wood plank will take care of pan problem, but then there's back wall that needs to be installed and then on top of it there will be drywall (going to the ceiling)....
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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Construct a plumb stud pocket
    according to the Roughing-in
    information on the back page.
    I would fir out the walls to make them plumb and straight.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member Bratan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    I would fir out the walls to make them plumb and straight.
    Thanks Terry! I never heard about firring out, is it something like in this video? http://youtu.be/MLPEUZ7MAUE

    Last edited by Terry; 03-27-2013 at 11:20 AM.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    You can either sister wood studs alongside, or pick up a small table saw and shim the wall out. A table saw is nice for getting just the right size shims.

    http://www.dewalt.com/tools/machiner...s-dw745_2.aspx
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    Last edited by Terry; 03-27-2013 at 11:25 AM.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member Bratan's Avatar
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    You can either sister wood studs alongside, or pick up a small table saw and shim the wall out. A table saw is nice for getting just the right size shims.

    http://www.dewalt.com/tools/machiner...s-dw745_2.aspx
    That sounds like a plan, will make 1-1/2 shims out of new stud planks (probably just cut them in half). Thank you Terry!
    BTW it's funny, but that's the exact table saw i have
    Last edited by Bratan; 03-27-2013 at 11:36 AM.

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If the walls are not perfectly flat and plumb and in plane with each other, just take a new, full-sized stud and screw/glue it to the side of the existing ones and make it nice and plumb and square. Quicker and easier than ripping a bunch of studs that won't take into consideration any bowing or other issues unless you want to try to make some really long tapered shims, or if bowed, curved, which would be really difficult.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Junior Member Bratan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    If the walls are not perfectly flat and plumb and in plane with each other, just take a new, full-sized stud and screw/glue it to the side of the existing ones and make it nice and plumb and square. Quicker and easier than ripping a bunch of studs that won't take into consideration any bowing or other issues unless you want to try to make some really long tapered shims, or if bowed, curved, which would be really difficult.
    Good point! Actually I just got another suggestion from someone. I don't have to rip/cut anything, just buy 2x4 and screw them to the existing stud but at 90 degree angle, so it will be like "T" shape if looking from top/ceiling. Since 2x4 is actually 1.5 inch it would make the gap. But yeah if wall is uneven or new studs wrapped I'll have a problem...

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