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Thread: Troubleshoot/Repair or Replace 10+ year old Hague?

  1. #16
    DIY Junior Member Hugh Hempel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lifespeed View Post
    Add up your Service Flow Rate requirements carefully. Is it occasionally possible you'll have three showers going at once, plus the washing machine, dishwasher, a faucet and a toilet? That could be 16 - 18 GPM. Obviously you don't want to size for everything turned on at once, but a reasonable maximum.
    My total flow rate MAX is more than 50gpm (2 dishwasher, 2 washing machines, 3 tubs, 8 sinks, 6 toilets, 5 showers...) I am going to "guesstimate" that my "practical SFR" is in the range of 12-15gpm...

  2. #17
    DIY Senior Member lifespeed's Avatar
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    Yeah, you need a good-sized softener.
    Lifespeed

  3. #18
    DIY Junior Member Hugh Hempel's Avatar
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    Update: I got some HACH hardness test strips and it turns out my water is pushing 15+ grains at the moment (I suspect our muni water is using wells heavily at this time). This is almost 3 times higher than the assumptions we were using above.

    I have also decided to go with the Fleck 7000 (at least) to maintain SFR. I would prefer a twin for efficiency, but see no product options for less than $2500 (Fleck 9500 twin) that will give me both the FLOW and the TWIN...

    Dittohead suggested some other valves in a PM, but they are a tad too pricey (similar to 9500) and I prefer to stick to product I can buy online (including parts).

    According to some online sellers of 7000sxt products, IF I were to wish to maintain about 20gpm flow minimum, I would need to install a 2.5 cuft system (80,000 grains). This is probably overkill for my hardness, but from other posts on this forum, I suspect that I can tune the system with low salt/ft3 and longer regen periods and be in good shape.

    ASSUMING I want to go with a 2.5 cuft system, can someone confirm the proper tank size and whether or not to use gravel underbed... The tank (13x54 Resin Tank) suggested by one online reseller for 2.5 cuft seems undersized to me (based on comments in this forum). Since the incremental cost of a slightly bigger tank is nominal, I would rather slightly oversize and allow for a gravel underbed (if recommended here) and adequate freeboard...

    I also plan to upgrade to 10% crosslink.

    Thanks a million for sticking with me on this!

    Hugh

  4. #19
    DIY Senior Member mialynette2003's Avatar
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    Have you checked into a Clack twin tank system? I sent you a PM.

  5. #20
    DIY Senior Member lifespeed's Avatar
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    Consider buying a Hach 5B test kit to more accurately measure your hardness as you may make purchase decisions based on this number. At 15 GPG and your stated useage of 466 gallons per day, that is 7K grains per day. A 2.5 cu ft system at 8 lbs/ cu ft should give you about 60K capacity, so would be reasonably efficient while having both appropriate maximum service flow rate, and reasonable minimum flow rate for a home. What would likely not be the best solution is to up the single-tank solution to 3.5 cu ft to gain enough capacity for 5 - 10 days run time between regenerations.

    If your hardness doesn't increase much past 15 GPG you should get 8 - 9 days between regenerations, which is fine if you don't have iron or manganese in your water. If hardness or water use increases significantly the single-tank 2.5 cu ft will become less efficient. The high flow twin tank system is definitely more expensive than the average system, but your application is also more demanding than average.

    Edit: one alternative to 10% crosslinked resin is a backwashing carbon filter ahead of the softener to remove chlorine or chloramine, whichever your municial supplier uses. Naturally this is more expensive than a resin upgrade, but some people prefer not to drink chlorinated water or breath it in the shower. Personal preference, I suppose.
    Last edited by lifespeed; 03-25-2013 at 09:33 AM.
    Lifespeed

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