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Thread: Troubleshoot/Repair or Replace 10+ year old Hague?

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  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Hugh Hempel's Avatar
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    Default Troubleshoot/Repair or Replace 10+ year old Hague?

    Greetings,

    Newcomer to the forum. Impressed by the knowledge and candor expressed by the regulars!

    I have really bad "hard water" build up on the shower glass and water fixtures throughout my recently purchased home.

    I inherited a Hague 13baq. I am guessing it is 10+ years old.

    The unit was inactive/unplugged (not bypassed) for quite some time.

    I recently restarted it (added salt) and the unit appears to be recharging. It is obvious, however, that I am still not getting "soft" water. I have also seen virtually no drop in salt levels for more than a month (no salt bridge)...

    More specifics:
    • "City Water" (it is well sourced nearby)
    • Home Occupants: 7
    • Water Usage: 11-14,000g/mo (466g/day average) peak is 1000g/day est.
    • 5.5 Baths
    • Very Heavy Laundry
    • Very Heavy Kitchen Usage
    • Water Pressure; Excellent 60psi+
    • Main Line Pipe Size: 1-1/4"
    • Current Hague Inlets: 1"
    • NO LOCAL HAGUE DEALER


    Here is the water analysis from the city:

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    My questions:
    1. Should I spend the time/energy to troubleshoot the Hague device given it's mfg and lack of information/parts?
    2. If yes, can someone recommend a good troubleshooting guide for Hague? Where can I source parts?
    3. If no, I am looking for help sizing/selecting a replacement system...
    4. What size system should I consider? (my math indicates 2.0+cuft)
    5. I am open to TWIN tanks. Should I consider (require)?
    6. Any strong preference of brand?
    7. Does my water analysis suggest any special "features" or prefilters?
    8. What about "turbolators" or special resins?


    My local water authority also suggested that my spotting problems could be created by SILICA or other "solids" that are "not removed" by a softener system. Can anyone comment on the truth in this statement??? Perhaps a combination of Salt Based Water Softening plus some other forms of filtration is required????

    EDIT: Water authority indicated that while SILICA is not analyzed in the above data, there is evidence that high amounts of SILICA are present in the system.

    Thanks a million in advance!
    Last edited by Hugh Hempel; 03-20-2013 at 02:47 PM. Reason: Missing Data Point

  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member mialynette2003's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Hempel View Post
    [*]Should I spend the time/energy to troubleshoot the Hague device given it's mfg and lack of information/parts?If you don't have a local dealer, I would say to get another unit that the parts are readily available for furture repairs.[*]If yes, can someone recommend a good troubleshooting guide for Hague? Where can I source parts?I have some manuals for the Hague but the parts will be hard to come by. Not all dealers are willing to sell just parts.[*]If no, I am looking for help sizing/selecting a replacement system...[*]What size system should I consider? (my math indicates 2.0+cuft)[*]I am open to TWIN tanks. Should I consider (require)?I would go with a twin because of the amount of people.[*]Any strong preference of brand?Fleck or Clack[*]Does my water analysis suggest any special "features" or prefilters?Unless you are wanting to remove chlorine, no prefilter is needed.[*]What about "turbolators" or special resins?No turbulator is needed but if you do not remove the chlorine prior to the softener with may want to consider 10% crosslink resin.[/LIST]

    My local water authority also suggested that my spotting problems could be created by SILICA or other "solids" that are "not removed" by a softener system. Can anyone comment on the truth in this statement??? Perhaps a combination of Salt Based Water Softening plus some other forms of filtration is required????

    EDIT: Water authority indicated that while SILICA is not analyzed in the above data, there is evidence that high amounts of SILICA are present in the system.

    Thanks a million in advance!
    I would look into renting to see you your problem is with the hardness vs silica before purchasing.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member Hugh Hempel's Avatar
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    Default Clarification on "renting"...?

    Quote Originally Posted by mialynette2003 View Post
    I would look into renting to see you your problem is with the hardness vs silica before purchasing.
    Thanks a million for the thoughtful reply!

    I had arrived at largely the same conclusions.

    Are you suggesting "renting" a water softener system? or something else? I have not heard of the option to rent a system although I agree with the idea...

    My research about qualified folks here in Reno has not turned up any good candidates, so I suspect that I may find it difficult to find someone to rent from...

    Assuming I go with a twin system, would you agree that a pair of 1.0 cuft tanks would suffice? I have the space and budget for a pair of 1.5 if recommended...

    IF my problem has more to do with Silica than with hardness, can you recommend a solution? Is this simply whole whose backwash filtration?

    Thanks again!!!

    EDIT: Apparently my Silica levels are in the neighborhood of 60. Also it appears that Silica removal on a home/usage of my size is cost prohibitive/difficult with today's tech (mostly RO)... So, for now, I am going to focus on water softening alone. I am headed down the path towards a new Fleck system. Only decisions left at this point are twins versus single and what SIZE.
    Last edited by Hugh Hempel; 03-21-2013 at 02:22 PM. Reason: New Info

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member catman's Avatar
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    I don't see any point in renting something, I am sure there are some basic tests that will tell you whether silica is the issue or not. Have you talked to your neighbors? At any rate, in my house I ingherited a Hague 23BAQ unit and there is a receipt that it was purchased in 2002. So it is at least 10-11 years old. Mine had a faulty computer and the bypass was not working properly, so I took it out and put in a new system. I get postcards from the local Haugue dealer every month saying it is time for service, so they must know it is broken! EDIT: sorry did not see your edit with the updated silica info... .
    Last edited by catman; 03-21-2013 at 03:35 PM.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member Hugh Hempel's Avatar
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    Consensus seems to be REPLACEMENT and I tend to concur. I got similar advice from a local dealer I found that has a pretty good reputation.

    My neighbors generally confirm great benefit from a traditional softener system.

    I am headed down the path of a Fleck 9100 system. Leaning towards a twin in the 1.0 cuft range. Main remaining question is resin type. I have read conflicting info about the value of SST-60 or other resin upgrades...

    Any input would be welcome. Hope to purchase in the next day or so.

    Thanks again to all for comments and I will report back on progress and results for sure!

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member lifespeed's Avatar
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    That is a lot of water and hardness! In your situation it is especially important to carefully consider the design to ensure your (more than the average system) money is well-spent and results in excellent performance.

    Using your numbers of 466 - 1000 gallons and 68 - 90 grains of hardness your daily capacity requirements vary from 31K to 90K grains PER DAY. You are definitely in twin softener territory. Even with a 3.5 cu ft twin salted at 8 lbs for 24K X 3.5 = 84K of capacity per tank. You could regenerate between once every three days to more than once a day.

    The Fleck 9100 series is one obvious solution, but you have 1-1/4" plumbing and that is a 3/4" valve. It is best to get a valve with internal ports as large as your plumbing. Perhaps the Fleck 9500 series has this? I am not sure. You'll need to check into which twin control valve is suitable for your pipe size.

    As to the SST-60, I would definitely give it a try despite the added expense. You will be going through a lot of salt and water. Anything you can do to improve your salt use vs. water quality would be a good idea, and SST-60 should do just that. You could probably salt at 6 lbs/cu ft and get the same or better water quality as salting at 8 lbs/cu ft with regular resin.

    Good luck

    Edit: there is no way 1 cu ft per tank is enough for your applicaiton
    Lifespeed

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