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Thread: Dry Well without the Well

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member chefwong's Avatar
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    Default Dry Well without the Well

    Just short of getting a camera inspection.....4 Outdoor Drain Grates. 3 of them all lead/pitch back to the 4th. From the 4th one...I suspect it may not tie into the house sewer at all.

    A Dry Well does not exist on the property.
    If it's just exterior water, do you suppose it could just be leading and draining into earth or is there any remote chance , it is leading out to the streetside sewer through another path..
    Last edited by chefwong; 04-29-2013 at 04:33 PM.

  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member Smooky's Avatar
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    I would think it went to the storm sewer or is piped to open ditches and discharges (untreated) into streams or other surface water.

  3. #3
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The chance of it being tied to the sewer system is almost ZERO. How do you know there is no "dry well", since it would be buried if there were one.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member Smooky's Avatar
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    Most cities have two separate sewer systems: storm sewer and sanitary sewers. Storm drains carry rainwater untreated to our rivers, ponds and retention areas. Sanitary sewers carry water from toilets and sinks to your local wastewater treatment plant which treats sewer water to meet State and Federal surface water quality standards. In the District of Columbia two-thirds of the city is served by separate sanitary and storm sewers. In older portions of the system, such as the District's downtown area, combined sanitary and storm sewer systems are prevalent. A combined sewer collects sanitary sewage and stormwater runoff in a single pipe system. The combined sewer is piped to the waste treatment plant except during high rainfall events. There are 60 combined sewer overflows in DC that spill untreated waste water into creeks and rivers.

    http://www.dcwater.com/about/facilit...atercollection

    http://www.dcwater.com/about/cip/stormwater.cfm

    Some cities in Arizona have a Separate Storm Sewer System

    http://phoenix.gov/waterservices/esd...ter/index.html
    Last edited by Smooky; 04-30-2013 at 06:33 PM.

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