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Thread: FIBEROCK Tile Backerboard vs HardieBacker Cement Board

  1. #1
    DIY Member piezomot's Avatar
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    Default FIBEROCK Tile Backerboard vs HardieBacker Cement Board

    Question to an expert- what is the difference between:

    FIBEROCK Tile Backerboard:

    http://www.homedepot.ca/product/fibe...-x-5-ft/911233

    and

    HardieBacker Cement Board:

    http://www.homedepot.ca/product/hard...3x5x042/996568

    When it comes for tiles installation.

    I have heard that FIBEROCK Tile Backerboard would not require any insulation material behind it as it moisture resistant already. Plus it will not crack during installation.

    Also how do I finish joints? The same way for HardieBacker Cement Board?


  2. #2
    DIY Member piezomot's Avatar
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    I have heard that FIBEROCK Tile Backerboard would not require any insulation material behind it as it moisture resistant already. Plus it will not crack during installation.


  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    They both can wick some moisture, neither is degraded if it does get wet, but neither is truly waterproof and you should have a vapor barrier behind it UNLESS you use a waterproofing layer on top of it. If you screw too close to an edge, you can damage either. I tend to use Hardibacker. Either works. It was funny in the video, when grouting, what the guy is doing verses what they say you should do are not the same! You will pull some grout out of the joints if you do not go diagonally and he was rubbing at 90-degrees. Their instructions on setting and measuring work okay IF the tile has little built-in spacers and are designed to be butted - the spacers leave enough room for the grout. Many tile does not have those built-in spacers, and the spacing can vary all over the place depending on your personal preference and the tile selected, so the measuring process could be way off.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Post(s) deleted by John Whipple
    Last edited by johnfrwhipple; 03-15-2014 at 03:44 PM.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnfrwhipple View Post
    Jim i thought you use drywall. Now it's hardibacker? Really? Did you read your posts from the other day?
    Stop being such a jerk...I've NEVER advocated drywall anywhere in a wet area unless following Schluter's approved methods...this is not one and you know it!
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Member Justadrip's Avatar
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    Don't worry Jim.... Whipple is just being Whipple. This is one of the last remaining forums he hasn't been booted from. He will tow the line.

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    DIY Member jadziedzic's Avatar
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    You know, John, I'm very impressed by your knowledge of products & technology related to the tile business. I think you're a dedicated individual who really tries to do his best, and your work I've seen appears to be top-notch. Unfortunately, the one aspect of you that people will most remember is that your actions and behavior on 'net forums is, simply put, immature when it comes to your ongoing feud with Schluter and their certifications regarding use of drywall under Kerdi.

    On one hand you are rightly telling people that flood testing showers is mandated by the plumbing code, but at the same time you have an ongoing problem with the concept of product certification that complies with a given code.

    Is using drywall under Kerdi a good idea? My *personal opinion* jives with yours - it's a stupid idea. Is it permitted by code? Yes, where Schluter has obtained the necessary certifications. Is it acceptable to your local Authority Having Jurisdiction? Ultimately that's the person who has the final say.

    Please, give it a rest.

  8. #8
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    FWIW, Schluter does say to flood test the shower in their instructions...
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Post(s) deleted by John Whipple
    Last edited by johnfrwhipple; 03-15-2014 at 03:44 PM.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member DougB's Avatar
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    I think it's pretty obvious: A shower / bath is a key component to a modern home. The home owner has invested time / money / energy / into the project. It's a heavy, dirty, job. A lot of planning, problem solving go into each job. The cost and application of the materials is significant. The expected outcome is to last 40 - 50 years.

    The difference in the cost of cement board - that is 100% water resistant - vs dry wall is so insignificant that there is absolutely no reason to risk - even a small failure of the membrane.

    Who knows - a faucet stem or a joint could leak slightly in the wall - once that drywall is wet - it's done.

  11. #11
    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Post(s) deleted by John Whipple
    Last edited by johnfrwhipple; 03-15-2014 at 03:45 PM.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  12. #12
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    You could extend the concern to any home's structure by saying what if they didn't install the windows, doors, or roof properly. If that happens, you'll have damage - damage that may stay hidden until it becomes severe. In a conventional shower, the walls are expected to get wet and you need something that won't be damaged when it happens. CBU is the primary material used since there aren't many people left that are willing to pay for or install a good mudded wall. In a home, the internal walls are expected to remain dry because the windows, doors, and roof are expected to be installed properly - you don't put cbu on the walls for that 'what if' they leak and some places will see much more severe conditions than in a shower - hurricane force winds, torrential rainstorms, really nasty water blowing sideways at high velocities. But, what if you have a leak in your kitchen sink...do you install cbu on the wall there? What about the vanity sink, or around the washing machine? No...not that you couldn't but millions of homes in the USA and elsewhere deem it too small of a risk to be worthwhile. You don't expect your plumbing to leak in the foreseeable future. The vast majority of the time when it does, it doesn't do it from stems, it leaks out the tub spout or showerhead (few use a 'stem' any more, either, it's all cartridges). When properly installed, you don't expect your Kerdi membrane to leak. So, the risk factor, for most people, John excepted, is small, and you have a choice...the quicker, easier, less expensive, fewer joints material, or spend money on something that will take longer, cost more, and not provide a benefit? If it is deemed a benefit to you, go for it. I have confidence in the material, the manufacturer, and my ability to 'do it right the first time'. Feel free to add as many extra layers of protection as you see fit.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Post(s) deleted by John Whipple
    Last edited by johnfrwhipple; 03-15-2014 at 03:45 PM.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  14. #14
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    You're right in that a properly built shower is waterproof (or totally water resistant anyway) before the tile are installed - and, that's the key - before the tile are installed. And, a properly built Kerdi shower is both waterproof AND for practical purposes, vapor proof unless you go to extra measures needed for a steam shower - all, before the tile are installed. Personally, I think hotmop is a lousy way to build a shower...I think it's the availability of cheap labor and tradition that it's still around. If you then try to use Kerdi on it, that's even dumber unless you tear out the drain and install a proper Kerdi one - then ignore that it's there at all. When building a shower, it's dumb to mix systems and barriers on both sides of panels is also dumb as it traps moisture, if it ever got there.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  15. #15
    DIY Senior Member DougB's Avatar
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    Residential Building Codes:

    Section 2509.2 Base for tile.

    Cement, fiber-cement or glass mat gypsum backers in compliance with ASTM C 1178, C 1288 or C 1325 and installed in accordance with manufacturer recommendations shall be used as a base for wall tile in tub and shower areas and wall and ceiling panels in shower areas.

    2509.3 Limitations.

    Water-resistant gypsum backing board shall not be used in the following locations:

    ---> 2. Where there will be direct exposure to water or in areas subject to continuous high humidity.

    From a USG rep

    Residential Building Code everywhere requires no white gypsum wall board or green board - but rather a tile backer board made specifically for that purpose. Schluter does have a evaluation report that you can copy and take to the local building official and see if they accept it or not - then get their approval in writing before hanging your board and membrane.

    Most folks just use a traditional backer board and then the waterproof membrane because then there is absolutely no question that you meet code AND have a waterproof installation.


    http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...-P-2006-000019
    Last edited by DougB; 03-20-2013 at 10:43 AM.

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