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Thread: Can I vent come off the back of a 2" tee?

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    DIY Junior Member jer4242's Avatar
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    Default Can I vent come off the back of a 2" tee?

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Size:  45.6 KB. Or does the vent need to be before the tee. Thanks guys!

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    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    No, you can't And in Illinois you particularly can't do any plumbing without a license
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    DIY Junior Member jer4242's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Sawyer View Post
    No, you can't And in Illinois you particularly can't do any plumbing without a license
    It my own home b

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jer4242 View Post
    It my own home b
    It doesn't matter if you own the home, permits are ALWAYS required, and some states DO NOT ALLOW any plumbing except by a licensed plumber. We know that MASS. for example agressively seeks out non-licensed work, and fines are STEEP!

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    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    You guys need to chill out.

    It is perfectly legal to perform plumbing repairs to your own home in Illinois.

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    DIY Junior Member jer4242's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cacher_chick View Post
    You guys need to chill out.

    It is perfectly legal to perform plumbing repairs to your own home in Illinois.
    Thank you and I wil move the vent down stream of the sink drain.

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jer4242 View Post
    It my own home b
    We will always answer your questions here. If we know that something you are proposing or asking about is a code or law violation, we feel obligated to let you know. In the current instance, we have two opinions about whether or not a homeowner in Illinois can do work on his own home. I have not been able to pin it down, so to be on the safe side, please inquire at your local permit office. It is an undisputed fact that there ARE states and cities where you cannot.

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    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    And "own home" has a lot of meanings.

    As I'm sure Cacher Chick knows, in the Land of Cheese, state law says that it's illegal to do any plumbing, even on property that you own, except: (1) Farmers working on their own buildings; and (2) In (A) a one family dwelling that (B) you own and (C) you actually occupy as your primary residence. Plumbing on everything else, including multi-family dwellings, vacation cottages, rental homes, etc., has to be done by a licensed plumber. And of course the stuff has to be to code. And in Wisconsin, you can't do plumbing on a house you are building for yourself.

    In Illinois, the actual law is as follows; it is the exception to the otherwise-stated rule that you can't plan, install, etc., plumbing without a license:

    "Nothing herein contained shall prohibit the owner occupant or lessee occupant of a single family residence, or the owner of a single family residence under construction for his or her occupancy, from planning, installing, altering or repairing the plumbing system of such residence, provided that (i) such plumbing shall comply with the minimum standards for plumbing contained in the Illinois State Plumbing Code, and shall be subject to inspection by the Department or the local governmental unit if it retains a licensed plumber as an inspector; and (ii) such owner, owner occupant or lessee occupant shall not employ other than a plumber licensed pursuant to this Act to assist him or her.
    For purposes of this subsection, a person shall be considered an "occupant" if and only if he or she has taken possession of and is living in the premises as his or her bona fide sole and exclusive residence, or, in the case of an owner of a single family residence under construction for his or her occupancy, he or she expects to take possession of and live in the premises as his or her bona fide sole and exclusive residence, and he or she has a current intention to live in such premises as his or her bona fide sole and exclusive residence for a period of not less than 6 months after the completion of the plumbing work performed pursuant to the authorization of this subsection, or, in the case of an owner of a single family residence under construction for his or her occupancy, for a period of not less than 6 months after the completion of construction of the residence. Failure to possess and live in the premises as a sole and exclusive residence for a period of 6 months or more shall create a rebuttable presumption of a lack of such intention."

    So, simply-put, it's similar conceptually to Wisconsin, except a lessee can do plumbing, and you can do plumbing in a one-family home you are building for yourself to be your exclusive residence, but you actually have to live there or it will be assumed that you always intended to flip it. The danger of abuse of this exception is probably why Wisconsin bans the practice outright. And Illinois makes clear that you can't hire people to help you other than a licensed plumber. While that probably technically means that you can't get your brother-in-law to help you, the real purpose of that prohibition is probably to keep you from backdooring the work of handi-hacks by saying that you are doing the plumbing and they are "helping".
    Last edited by wjcandee; 03-02-2013 at 04:58 PM.

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