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Thread: Roughing in Bathroom in Basement Early 1900s vintage house

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    DIY Junior Member Gutie050's Avatar
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    Default Roughing in Bathroom in Basement Early 1900s vintage house

    Hi everyone my name is Eric. First time posting here although I have been on the site many times reading. I live in Minnesota.

    Anyways, I'm currently working on roughing in for a 3 piece bath in the basement. The house was built in 1916 I believe. It has extra heavy cast iron drain pipes currently. I'm looking at replacing a 6' or so chunk of the cast iron with PVC and using No hub couplers to attach the PVC to the cast iron. I believe I will use Mission P400 specialty band seal clamps to go from the 4" Xh cI to the 4" PVC replacement sections. From there, I plan on using various sized wye fittings to split off for my shower, toilet and vanity as well as to hook up to the kitchen sink drain line that connects into the section I'll be replacing. 2" no hub couplers to attach the kitchen cast iron line and the laundry cast iron line. I attached a diagram of my plan and I would appreciate any comments or concerns with my plan. I believe I wont need to add any vents as the vanity run and shower run will be under 5" from the main line and will be 2". Is this correct? The toilet will also be well under 6' from the main line. Thanks, Eric


    I'll have to upload my diagram from home later tonight

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    DIY Junior Member Gutie050's Avatar
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    Name:  1004_roughin_3.jpg
Views: 180
Size:  45.5 KB. Diagram got.it to work on my phone

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    DIY Senior Member kreemoweet's Avatar
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    Labels on your photo are way too small to read.

    Re vents: what does the distance to the "main line" have to do with anything? I kinda doubt that big vertical cast iron pipe is a vent. If there are no
    existing vents down there, you'll need to put some in.

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    DIY Junior Member Gutie050's Avatar
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    hm thought you would be able to click on it for a larger version. I'll have to rework that

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    DIY Junior Member Gutie050's Avatar
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    Good chance I'm interpreting wrong on the not needing vents but here what I was referencing. My interpretation of this was that they would all be direct vented by the main stack as they are closer than the max distance for each size vent. 2" for the shower and vanity, 3" for the toilet so within 5' for 2" and 6' on the 3" for the toilet.


    Table 2 and the section below on direct venting
    http://inspectapedia.com/plumbing/Pl...efinitions.htm

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    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    The stack is only a vent above the highest fixture drain connection.

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    DIY Junior Member Gutie050's Avatar
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    So its not considered a wet vent at this point?

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    DIY Junior Member Gutie050's Avatar
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    I'm scratching the layout above. I'llpost a revised version when I have it.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    You can only wet vent WITHIN a single bathroom, on a single floor, and then, there are lots of things that must be done right...never wet vent between floors.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    You cannot use a "waste line" from another bathroom for a vent, and the way you have drawn it, just about everything is "illegal" for one reason or another. You are out of your "comfort zone" and may have exceeded your "level of incompetence".
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    DIY Junior Member Gutie050's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    You cannot use a "waste line" from another bathroom for a vent, and the way you have drawn it, just about everything is "illegal" for one reason or another. You are out of your "comfort zone" and may have exceeded your "level of incompetence".
    HJ. I'm looking to learn before cutting any pipes.
    Last edited by Gutie050; 02-28-2013 at 07:17 PM.

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    DIY Junior Member Gutie050's Avatar
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    Jadnashua - Thanks. Wasn't sure on the wet venting between floors. Appreciate it. The reason all I've done is digging/ breaking concrete is I know I'm not ready to start cutting the pipes and reworking them. So on the diagram I previously posted. 1) All traps need vented 2) I read somewhere else that there is a max number of times you can connect into the main line. What is that number? 3) I'm still working it, but if I were to route the laundry drain and shower line into the toilet drain with a vent right before the shower drain would that that would cover me for venting on the shower correct? Can I wet vent the toilet that way at all? The laundry drain is presently vented and I would keep that vent in place so it would continue to be vented but rather than connect directly to the main with it it would route into the 3" toilet drain. Also just a note. I pulled a permit, it will be 100% inspected. This is a learning experience but Id rather get a solid plan before I cut any pipes/ have the inspector out.

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    DIY Junior Member Gutie050's Avatar
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    Name:  IMAG0293.jpg
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    Ok so I'm just ignoring the kitchen and vanity line to focus on figuring out the shower/toilet/ laundry drain lines. In the diagram, the yellow lines are vents, vented straight up. Assuming that the two vents were to connect and go through the roof would these be working locations for them or no?

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The number of fixture units draining into the main is what determines its size, not the quantity of taps into it. There are some minimums, like 3" on a toilet, and often, 2" for anything (or above) underneath a slab, IOW, nothing smaller than 2" under a slab in most places. Then, there's a maximum number of degrees change of direction there can be before you need to install a cleanout. Depending on what's being vented and the size of the pipe, determines the maximum length of the trap arm. Your vent always needs to come off the trap arm before the drain turns down.

    You can combine vents on the same floor if done at least 6" above the flood plane of the highest fixture, or 42" above the floor, whichever is higher. The same number applies if you tap into it on a floor above if you don't want to run it all the way to the roof. But again, the size of the pipe is based on the number of fixture units you are venting (or draining).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The toilet's vent is okay, but the other one is obscuring the connections behind it so we cannot tell if that would be correct or not. Regardless of what we tell you, the city will make the final decision when you apply for the building permit.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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