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Thread: How to install tee

  1. #1

    Default How to install tee?

    I need to install a tee at the circle. If I have to cut the lenght of the tee out what will be left to soldier. I can't cut the pipe and move it up or down to install the tee.
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    Last edited by p-61@msn.com; 01-14-2006 at 04:03 PM.

  2. #2
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    You need to use a slip coupling and install a short nipple on one side of the T. You cut the pipe slide the t on 1 side and measure the other where the nipple stops and cut the pipe there. Slide the slip coupling all the way on the copper pipe, install the T, slide the coupling 1/2 way up the nipple, aim the T where you want it, and solder it up or continue running your copper and then solder.

    Be sure to clean and flux all pipe and fittings to be soldered.

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    A slip coupling is basically a straight coupler without the normal stop in the middle that centers the two pieces of pipe. This allows it to slide entirely over the pipe. It's not a bad idea to mark or measure the pipe so that when you slide it back over the cut portion, you've got about 1/2 of it over each cut portion.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    There is no rule that says you have to run this straight.

    If you buy three 90 els and a tee, you can offset the pipe and add the tee without a slip coupling.

  5. #5
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    While this is true when I see work like that I think to my self... Hmmm a wanabe or home owner. .
    Last edited by Cass; 01-15-2006 at 04:28 AM.

  6. #6
    Plumber plumber1's Avatar
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    Default copper tee

    I gotta believe that if you just cut out 3/4" that you will be able to get enough movement to get the tee where you want it. I don't see any problem.

  7. #7
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    When I see a situation like that I always wonder if it will be possible to get all the water out of the lower pipe and shut it off completely. If there is a trickle of water or the water can't be removed, it will be impossible to solder. If there is NO water from the lower pipe, and the valve above doesn't leak, then the water can be displaced from the lower one and the joint can be soldered.

  8. #8

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    I thought of using a product called Just For Copper. Have any used it or know anything about it?

  9. #9
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Default Just For Copper

    I'm looking forward to reading the comments from the pros on this site. I notice that none of the testimonials on the Just for Copper site are from pros.
    http://www.justforcopper.com/Products.htm

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by p-61@msn.com
    I thought of using a product called Just For Copper. Have any used it or know anything about it?
    I don't know anything about it....BUT...I read their spec sheet ( Technical Specifications )...and to say the least: I am not impressed

    Expiration Time:
    One year if it is maintained between 18C and 24C
    18C = 64.4F
    24C = 75.2F
    F= (C*1.8)+32

    That's not too impressive of a spread - 10.6F....and that wall appears to be an exterior wall (pipe to a hose bibb?). Are you certain that area will remain within the parameters indicated? For more than a year?

    I *might* consider it a band aid on a second home/rental property - just until I can return with some fittings and a torch.

  11. #11
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    That temperature range is in the bottle, after opening, before use. After installation the temp is -40 to +250F.

  12. #12
    Plumber plumber1's Avatar
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    Default soldering

    Just turn the water off and take the pressure off somewhere at a fixture that's low in tour house, like the basement laundry tub.

    Shine that pipe with sand cloth.

    Cut 3/4" out of the pipe at the point that your putting the tee. If you need to dry out the pipe, use the torch. You can boil the water out of that lower part.

    Solder the tee and a short piece of pipe, then solder on a valve.
    I think you will find that its not difficult.......

  13. #13
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Not a very fancy solution for water in a short length of pipe like this, but with a short length of tubing you can suck the water out.

  14. #14

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    this is inside of my basement. The part going into the wall is going to the outside faucet.

  15. #15
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Then this is really simple. The stopless coupler is a simple answer. What is the point of using some "just as good as" product when sweating with a torch is so simple, so sure, and so time proven?

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