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Thread: Decisions Decisions

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member jb4trucks's Avatar
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    Default Decisions Decisions

    I have about a 12 year old AO Smith water Heater. Temperature seems to be fading this is the second one in the home since built on 1997 first on lasted about two years. I have checked for setitment none,( this improved after installing a Kinecto water softener a few years ago) the anode is gone down to a coat hanger size wire. I have to set the themostat on high to maintain and real volume.

    I want to replace this unit on my time rather than wait for a complete failure. Looking at the GE 12 year from HD and the Bradford White defender 50. I need a low Nox for So Calif. Both look good should I consider the Rheem? it has a lower Btu burner? Open to suggestions. Want an energy effiencent unit. Also did the rebates get renewed for 2013? cant find any info

    Thanks

    JB
    Last edited by jb4trucks; 01-12-2013 at 11:41 AM.

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    In Orange County you need an Ultra Low Nox, which is the only thing any local store or supplier will carry. They are $50 to $100 more than if you were outside the SCAQMD. GE is Rheem, good unit. Bradford White may be #1 choice of plumbers.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member jb4trucks's Avatar
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    Should i be looking for the size of the annode rods? what about recovery times?

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    SOft water will probably mean it's not a bad idea to replace the anode periodically. There are a few that come with two installed, verses the more common single one. Recovery time is entirely dependent on how you use hot water in your house. Fast recovery only becomes important if the size is small and you regularly have people taking showers one after the other, or maybe with a delay in between. The first hour rating may be more useful. IF the tank is okay for your rush of hot water use, and you don't need it again until later in the day, fast recovery just costs more for that bigger burner - the total energy use may end up the same. WIth any burner, it is most efficient if it doesn't turn on/off frequently. A bigger burner on lots of short/medium draws, might end up less efficient since the burns would be shorter. So, depends on how you use it, whether that's better. A bigger tank might end up more efficient in the long run with a smaller burner.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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