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Thread: Toto Soiree Lazy Flush

  1. #16
    DIY Junior Member hollywoodgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    If you have a partial blockage on the main line, the toilet won't flush when there's no place for the waste to go. Overnight, it might drain down, and the first couple of flushes might work right. But, take a shower, or two, and if there's a blockage, it could back up enough to then prevent the toilet from flushing.
    I'll keep this in mind and if it happens, I'll call the drain cleaning company referred to me by the plumber. Thank you.

  2. #17
    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    Glad to see you are back in business.

    Hopefully, the auger did the job. I'm a little suprised that he didn't just unbolt the toilet, pull it up and check the trap manually.

    Terry has some great photos on here of things like the GI Joe he found wedged in the outflow hole at the bottom of the toilet on one job, so pulling the toilet is an easy (for him) and useful thing to do if the clog source isn't obvious.

    If you end up needing a drain cleaner and if you strike out with or don't like the drain cleaning company your plumber recommends, our member MacPlumb often has good recommendations of drain cleaning pros in different areas, as he is a master plumber with expertise in that business. With regard to our own thoroughly-clogged driveway drain and rainwater drainage system, I reached out to him for a recommendation in New York after the first two "drain cleaning" companies told me that they couldn't open the drain and that I should have a contractor come in with a backhoe and repipe the system at a cost north of $5000. MacPlumb's guy used a water jet system to clear the pipes from the driveway drain some fifty feet to a cistern that nobody believed was connected to that drain (1900s house). He did this at a cost of about $450, and then, for good measure, cleaned the overflow pipe from that cistern to a french drain some distance away. I couldn't have been happier, particularly because I much prefer to maintain/repair the robust old system rather than replace it. Needless to say, I have recommended him to anyone that even hints that they need a service like this, and they have been universally-happy. Sorry I haven't seen anyone mentioned in Massachusetts, but I'm sure we can hook that up if it comes to it. Which hopefully it won't.

  3. #18
    DIY Junior Member hollywoodgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjcandee View Post
    Glad to see you are back in business.

    Hopefully, the auger did the job. I'm a little suprised that he didn't just unbolt the toilet, pull it up and check the trap manually.
    I'm not, it was easier not to
    Terry has some great photos on here of things like the GI Joe he found wedged in the outflow hole at the bottom of the toilet on one job, so pulling the toilet is an easy (for him) and useful thing to do if the clog source isn't obvious.

    If you end up needing a drain cleaner and if you strike out with or don't like the drain cleaning company your plumber recommends, our member MacPlumb often has good recommendations of drain cleaning pros in different areas, as he is a master plumber with expertise in that business. With regard to our own thoroughly-clogged driveway drain and rainwater drainage system, I reached out to him for a recommendation in New York after the first two "drain cleaning" companies told me that they couldn't open the drain and that I should have a contractor come in with a backhoe and repipe the system at a cost north of $5000. MacPlumb's guy used a water jet system to clear the pipes from the driveway drain some fifty feet to a cistern that nobody believed was connected to that drain (1900s house). He did this at a cost of about $450, and then, for good measure, cleaned the overflow pipe from that cistern to a french drain some distance away. I couldn't have been happier, particularly because I much prefer to maintain/repair the robust old system rather than replace it. Needless to say, I have recommended him to anyone that even hints that they need a service like this, and they have been universally-happy. Sorry I haven't seen anyone mentioned in Massachusetts, but I'm sure we can hook that up if it comes to it. Which hopefully it won't.
    I may just take you up on that, thank you.

  4. #19
    DIY Junior Member lennym's Avatar
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    I'm also having a lazy flush on a three year old Soiree. Problem appeared about three months ago and is sporadic. After reading this thread I dumped 3.5 gallons of water in VERY quickly and it went down just as quickly as I could dump it in (and so quickly that it left the water level low in the bowl). So it doesn't look like a blockage problem. It has always appeared to be a problem of not enough water coming down.

    Then I called Toto and was told to make certain that the tank water level was within 1/4" of the top of the overflow tube. I adjusted the fill valve for its maximum height and that is just about at 1/4" from the top of the tube. But the lazy flush still pops up now and then, though I try to press the lever the same every time.

    Must be something wrong with the flapper, which is original. Any further suggestions?

    If I were to replace the flapper with a 3rd party one, should I keep the floating plastic stuff above the flapper in place?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by lennym; 09-06-2013 at 08:34 AM.

  5. #20
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If there's too much slack in the chain holding the flapper, it doesn't go up far enough, and will close early. There should be just enough slack in the chain so that the flapper can reseat itself, and very little before you start lifting it when using the flush handle. The float could have become waterlogged and is no longer doing its job. Many of the newer ones do not use a float.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #21
    DIY Junior Member lennym's Avatar
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    Thanks for the suggestion. I've had a look at the chain. While there's some slack, there's no question but the lever lifts the flapper to the max. It does not seem like there's water in the float. I have now changed the hole into which the chain attaches on the brass lever rod to the last one. Gives it a very slightly different angle and maybe lifts the flap a bit more. We'll see.

    Does the current Soiree use a float? If not, what? I think I've read on this forum that there are some 3rd party flappers that permit adjustment of the amount of water drop. Time to replace? Any suggestions? Thanks.

  7. #22
    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    The Korky 3060BP is an adjustable 3" flapper that would fit your Soiree. Korky is who we recommend on here. It doesn't have or need a float. The new Toto flappers don't use a float.

  8. #23
    DIY Junior Member lennym's Avatar
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    Yes, after all it was the flapper. So I had to buy a new one, and this will be my 3rd in about 3 years. IIRC Toto sent a new one for the first replacement, but not for this one. Following up on the suggestion in another thread, since putting in the second flapper I'm using two rubber washers to center it. I can't figure out why the little arms that hold the flappers are so obviously oversized.

    Anyway I got an adjustable Korky, without the float, and find that it is best at the lowest number (1). The flush can be fine tuned to a small extent using the water level. So three flappers in 3 years, and the need for centering washers. Not a good record for an expensive toilet!

    Just for the record, I also have an 8 year old Toto Carrollton with the original blue flapper that has never had to be changed. Go figure.

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