(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Washing machine drain

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member duarten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    washington
    Posts
    2

    Default Washing machine drain

    My washing machine currently drains into my utility sink. We find this very annoying because the utility sink clogs easily - a rag may fall down by accident, or lint may build up. We try to be very careful about it, but we still get water on the floor every now and then, and that has even caused damage.

    We dont care about having the utility sink. it is just there to drain the washer, and it isn't even easily accessible for other things. We would love to have the washer plumbed so that it does not drain this way. our house was built in the '50s, and i have been able to gather that it is being drained this way because the pipes are not large enough to drain the washer.

    What I am wondering is how big of a project it might be to change this. I fully expect to hire a plumber to do it, because i just don't trust myself to think of everything that needs to be done in a project like this, but I would like to know if this is a simple thing for a plumber to do or is it complicated, and if it tends to be expensive.

    more information: the washer is in a closet on top of a finished floor in what used to be a garage with concrete under it. The drain pipe goes into the wall that is shared with the kitchen (and from there down to the crawl space). i didn't know if that would matter for access to the pipes.

  2. #2
    IBEW Electrician big2bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Anaheim, Ca.
    Posts
    141

    Default

    I am not a plumber, but without seeing it, it's kinda like asking how long a piece of string is.

  3. #3
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Yakima WA
    Posts
    7,246

    Default

    A plumber on site can advise you of what problems you may face, but here are a few basics. The washer stand pipe needs to be 2" diameter. It must be trapped and vented above the floor. It may not be reduced in size, but may go into a larger main drain. The connection to the main drain and installation of the trap and vent will likely be the possible problem areas, but again, the plumber doing the job can give you the most reliable information. Cost will depend on what is involved. Often jobs that appear to be quite simple with no more information that you have given us, can turn into a major project. I know this really begs the question you asked, but anything else would be guessing.

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member Hammerlane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    252

    Default

    Theres a good thread here on Terry's site that deals with wash machine/laundry tray plumbing. It is here:
    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...up-need-advice

    The picture below assumes all venting above fitting #5.

    It is alway convenient to have a laundry tub near the washer. If you have a plumber do the work I would want a lundry tub and the washer standpipe. But to each his own.

    A picture of your current setup(drain) may help.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  5. #5
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,202
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    A 50's home would have 1.5" for the kitchen.

    Since you are near the crawl, I would drop down there and find a 2" hub off the cast, pull the 1.5" out and using an inside hub fernco, run 2" out.
    2" is exactly twice the volume of 1.5" pipe.

    In today's codes, the only thing you can run with 1.5" is the lav.

    A washer used a 2" p-trap and standpipe.

    804.1 All plumbing fixtures or other receptors
    receiving the discharge of indirect waste pipes shall be
    approved for the use proposed and shall be of such
    shape and capacity as to prevent splashing or flooding
    and shall be located where they are readily accessible
    for inspection and cleaning. No standpipe receptor for
    any clothes washer shall extend more than thirty (30)
    inches (762 mm), nor less than eighteen (18) inches
    (457 mm) above its trap. No trap for any clothes
    washer standpipe receptor shall be installed below the
    floor, but shall be roughed in not less than six (6)
    inches (152 mm) and not more than eighteen (18)
    inches (457 mm) above the floor.
    Last edited by Terry; 12-21-2012 at 10:10 AM.

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member duarten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    washington
    Posts
    2

    Default

    big2bird - haha. i thought that might be an issue, but i honestly do not know the names of the parts, and the plumbing is in the wall so i can't see it. i think that we will have to just ask a plumber to come and look at it. i was just wondering if it was worth our time to try to fix it, or if the cost would outweigh the benefit and we should just try to deal with the current setup.

    Thanks, everybody, for responding! Hope you are having a great holiday season.

  7. #7
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,651

    Default

    quote; A 50's home would have 1.5" for the kitchen

    Maybe in Washington, but in Illinois we NEVER used 1 1/2" for a sink drain, other than for the trap arm. In fact, we seldom used 1 1/2" for ANYTHING because we would have to change the die to thread it.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  8. #8
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,405

    Default

    FWIW, the stand pipe on that picture is longer than code allows.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member Hammerlane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    252

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    FWIW, the stand pipe on that picture is longer than code allows.
    Are you sure about that??

  10. #10
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,405

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hammerlane View Post
    Are you sure about that??
    Assuming those are standard blocks, it's over the 30" allowed. Many cinder blocks are 8" tall, then add the mortar - it's over 4 blocks tall. A proper revent has to be at least 42", and it's higher than that and not that far off the floor.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

Similar Threads

  1. Washing machine drain tie in
    By phatman1969 in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-17-2011, 03:03 PM
  2. Washing Machine Drain
    By MrBrown in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 07-26-2009, 06:23 PM
  3. Washing Machine Drain?
    By Tire Boy in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-06-2008, 09:32 AM
  4. Washing Machine drain
    By citykid in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 07-20-2006, 07:05 PM
  5. Washing Machine Drain
    By LG in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-14-2006, 07:20 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •