(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: I destroyed my closet flange

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member ericp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    3

    Default I destroyed my closet flange

    The metal ring on my closet flange was rusted away. I cut off the top of the flange with a dremel, which left about 2 inches remaining around the outside of the waste pipe. When I couldn't get the rest of the ABS off of the pipe, I Googled and learned about solvent welding.

    I have no idea how to fix this and would greatly value your suggestions. The waste pipe is 3 inch ABS. I bought a 3 inch inside fit ABS flange. But, I've read that this size flange is to be avoided. It has a plastic ring, also best to avoid.

    Any ideas would be gratefully received.

    Name:  007.jpg
Views: 219
Size:  34.3 KBName:  008.jpg
Views: 212
Size:  70.7 KBName:  010.jpg
Views: 201
Size:  70.1 KBName:  014.jpg
Views: 200
Size:  63.7 KBName:  015.jpg
Views: 199
Size:  51.0 KB

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,376

    Default

    Too bad you cut off all that...they make repair rings that you could have used and not be in this situation. One type is hinged and would have fit in the notch the old one fit into, others are just a ring that can be bolted down to hold the flange bolts. How much height of straight pipe have you got to work with? If it's enough, you can pick up an inside pipe cutter (essentially a small circular saw on a shaft) to cut off enough, then glue on a coupling, a short piece of pipe, and a new flange. You could try to cut vertical notches in the flange, then trying to peel it off. If the joint is well done, it will damage the vertical piece of pipe, but maybe not enough to prevent a decent seal. If you have access or can gain it from underneath, you could maybe cut out more if required.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Yakima WA
    Posts
    7,245

    Default

    This may be beyond your ability to repair. You will certainly be time and probably money ahead if you call a plumber to install a new flange properly. Sometimes the best advice a DIY can get is to know when it's time to call for help.

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,172

    Default

    Access from below the concrete slab Jim?

    If you cannot find a plumber with some very specific tools you're going to be renting a jack hammer and taking up that floor.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member ericp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    3

    Default

    There is about 3.5 inches of straight pipe. Then, it starts curving towards the wall. But, about 1-1.5 inches of the straight pipe appears to be inside of an elbow fitting. There is 2 inches of flange remaining. So, if I cut off the straight pipe just below the flange, then I'll be right at the top of the elbow fitting.

  6. #6
    Retired Machine Repairman wptski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ericp View Post
    There is about 3.5 inches of straight pipe. Then, it starts curving towards the wall. But, about 1-1.5 inches of the straight pipe appears to be inside of an elbow fitting. There is 2 inches of flange remaining. So, if I cut off the straight pipe just below the flange, then I'll be right at the top of the elbow fitting.
    That would leave you with a portion of the straight piece inside the elbow, correct? You'd have to remove that to replace the straight piece. I've seen cutters powered by a hand drill to remove that but that was on much smaller PVC pipe.
    Bill
    Retired Machine Repairman
    Just a DIY'r

  7. #7
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Land of Cheese
    Posts
    3,134

    Default

    It would cost you almost nothing to try the inside fitting flange and see if you have problems flushing over the next couple of weeks. If you are not happy with results, you cut the slab so that the closet bend and flange can be replaced properly.

  8. #8
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dlarrivee View Post
    Access from below the concrete slab Jim?
    Can't tell if it is thinset around there from the tile, or concrete. There may or may not be enough room for a coupling if you cut it off inside. If you can get the flange out of there, you can use something like a RamBit to bore out the socket of the fitting below so you can glue a new one in. The cost of the tools may make it expedient to call a plumber, although the pieces aren't all that expensive. Depends on exactly what you have and where it is. Plus, would you ever use the tool(s) again? IF so, then the cost per use goes down, maybe way down.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  9. #9
    DIY Junior Member ericp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Thanks for all of your responses. The RamBit idea sounds like a good solution. I'll let you know if the plumber goes that route. Considering how slow I work plus the cost of fixing my mistakes, it's probably more cost effective to call a professional. Thanks again.

  10. #10
    Retired Machine Repairman wptski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    Can't tell if it is thinset around there from the tile, or concrete. There may or may not be enough room for a coupling if you cut it off inside. If you can get the flange out of there, you can use something like a RamBit to bore out the socket of the fitting below so you can glue a new one in. The cost of the tools may make it expedient to call a plumber, although the pieces aren't all that expensive. Depends on exactly what you have and where it is. Plus, would you ever use the tool(s) again? IF so, then the cost per use goes down, maybe way down.
    Ah! That's what you call that tool.
    Bill
    Retired Machine Repairman
    Just a DIY'r

Similar Threads

  1. Street 45/45 closet flange vs. spigot closet bend
    By Noth Jersey in forum Toilet Forum discussions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-03-2012, 09:27 PM
  2. closet flange to closet elbow distance
    By Pabs in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-13-2009, 07:12 AM
  3. Destroyed Inside Flange Woes
    By obsidian97 in forum Toilet Forum discussions
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 09-28-2008, 04:46 AM
  4. Questions about closet bends/closet flange.
    By ricky01 in forum Toilet Forum discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-27-2008, 02:13 PM
  5. How I destroyed my lawn (Sprinkler Troubleshooting)
    By craniac in forum Irrigation / Sprinkler Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-25-2008, 09:37 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •