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Thread: This old Delta faucet - replacing parts

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member BrianZ's Avatar
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    Default This old Delta faucet - replacing parts

    I am renovating an old Delta 'single lever waterfall faucet' 26964. I wanted to clean the lever part which had corrosion, and replace the sprayer. Now both parts have issues:

    1. The base of the faucet lever assembly leaks when the faucet is in the fully open position. If I close it a little, about a centimeter, it stops leaking.
    2. Water is not fully diverted to the sprayer. It's about 50/50 with the faucet now. Used to be that all the water would go to the sprayer when it was on.

    The sprayer is not quick release but has a nut on it that threads onto the sink pipe. While I was turning it my wrench slipped and bumped one of the other copper tubes leading into to the faucet. I don't see any leaks but maybe that caused a problem? (at this point I stopped and decided to leave the sprayer alone for now)

    For cleaning purposes, I also removed the faucet 'lever' handle -has a hex nut at the base of the handle that allows this- . This removes the lever from the 'ball joint' part. Scrubbed it with vinegar to get off mineral deposits, rinsed, and reassembled.

    I'm not sure which problem (water diversion versus faucet leak) was caused by which action (bumping the pipe versus removing/cleaning the faucet handle).

  2. #2
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    New faucet time
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Most of the sealing parts in the Delta faucet are readily available and fairly cheap. But, if the thing no longer looks good, it's time for replacement. Best thing to do is to call Delta...they may send you the parts for free, and possibly replace the whole thing if you are the original owner. If it is so pitted that new seals still allow it to leak, or quickly destroy them, agreed, it's time to replace the thing.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Junior Member BrianZ's Avatar
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    I'm not the original owner. I already bought a new spout and sprayer ($108.00). The rest looks ok, aside from whatever I knocked loose (or busted) it just needs cleaning, but the handle assembly is pretty complex (ball joint, springs, two inlet nipples, two outlet nipples, diverter assembly, and of course a bunch of gaskets and things). I don't know what is broken in there so I'll probably need to buy everything. The outer cosmetic parts are the most expensive so maybe if I can get them clean (green mineral deposits) it will save some $$. Someone told me to use vinegar, and that works somewhat.

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    Consultant cwhyu2's Avatar
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    Default advice

    Take your parts back and buy a new one, that will save more $ than trying to fix that one.

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member BrianZ's Avatar
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    Yes, replacing with a newer model (this one is discontinued so parts need to be mail ordered) would likely be less expensive if I can find one that has similar hookups (or some kind of adapters and hoses to re-route the intake/output lines).

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Most faucets these days (and for a long time) have used interchangeable hookups (this is not to say their internals are the same!). Almost any new faucet would hookup to your shutoff valves. But, it's also a good idea to replace the shutoff valves while your at it. Those typically come in one of three attachment methods: compression, solder, or screw-on. Compression and screw-on don't require any special tools. Pick the right shutoff to match the new faucet (most are the same), and things will just screw together. The harder thing may be to get the old one off the sink.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #8
    DIY Junior Member BrianZ's Avatar
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    The current shutoff valves are welded to copper pipes. These connect to the faucet via brass screw-on fittings and more copper pipes.
    Last edited by BrianZ; 12-16-2012 at 10:06 AM.

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    highly unlikely it is welded, but soldered. Those things wear out too, even though they're not being used - the older ones have a rubber washer in it and that often crumbles the first time you try to turn it off after years of sitting there which is why it's a good time to replace them when you replace the faucet.

    Most new faucets come with attached hoses that will screw right into the shutoff valve you have without the need of any adapters. As I said, often the hardest part is getting the old one off. SOmetimes, it's a pain tightening the new one down, but some are easier than others.

    As was noted, though, in MA, any plumbing must be done by a licensed plumber...you're on your own if you tackle this!
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  10. #10
    DIY Junior Member BrianZ's Avatar
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    Soldered, you are correct.

    I have no license. I do have a rebuild kit from home depot ($7.50).

    I'm not looking for long term function here, as I will likely be selling the house soon.

  11. #11
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If things are not pitted internally, the rebuild kit often works.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  12. #12
    DIY Junior Member BrianZ's Avatar
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    Yes, we'll see. Thanks.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    I am not sure which faucet you have, because I cannot remember any Delta faucet which has a "hex nut to remove the handle". BUt most waterfall faucets have the diverter inside the "tube" covering the faucet body. The repair parts are universl to all older Delta faucets.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  14. #14
    DIY Junior Member BrianZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    I am not sure which faucet you have, because I cannot remember any Delta faucet which has a "hex nut to remove the handle". BUt most waterfall faucets have the diverter inside the "tube" covering the faucet body. The repair parts are universl to all older Delta faucets.
    I may have the number wrong up top. There is also a '174' on the manual, so that might be the number. It may not be a hex nut, but I used a hex wrench to remove it, so it is some sort of hex. Maybe a hex screw.

    Home depot sold me universal kit. Which I will mess with this weekend if I can muster the courage. (If I fail the sink will be down till I get better parts.)

    Yes, the diverter is inside the faucet lever contraption - but not included in the home depot universal kit.

    (Meanwhile I tackled some easier 'off topic' faucet jobs like the rusted out 'ball joint levers' in the bathroom, again using 'universal' kits. That went ok, but they don't pop up very well. Another issue is the overflow of the dishwasher into the sink - with parts of vegetables we never had in the house-, but this will have to be a topic for a different thread. Maybe on the ghost channel.).

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    DIY Junior Member BrianZ's Avatar
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    Default followup

    To follow up...

    Success! The faucet was easy to disassemble and reassemble with new O-rings and parts from the standard Delta repair kit. Soaking everything in vinegar took off most of the copper deposits. Took about ten minutes of hands-on time. Doesn't look 'brand new' but that fixed the leak and the diverter works now.

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