(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Split pipe in a tight spot

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member ZE496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    5

    Default Split pipe in a tight spot

    I have a kitchen drain pipe that has a split in it. I took some siding off the exterior so the plumbing would be easier to access.

    As you can see, the pipe runs through a hole in a set of 4 studs. The split in the pipe is right at the elbow and down to almost where it enters the set of 4 studs. I can cut the pipe out. But given the pipe's length, I don't think I can fit a new length of pipe inbetween the 4 set studs and the next stud over. As you might also be able to see, there's a supply pipe on the elbow side of the stud set. I really don't want to notch the set of 4 studs and patch in a piece of wood after the pipe is replaced. I'm at a loss as to how to proceed. Any advice would be much appreciated!


  2. #2
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,202
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    If the water supply needs to be moved, that's just one more step.
    You take as many steps as the job requires. It's much better to remove and replace plumbing then it is to R&R wood structure.

    If you convert to PVC or ABS, Mission makes a nice shielded coupling that converts between the copper and plastic sizes and holds the pipe ends in perfect alignment.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member ZE496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thanks Terry.

    So would this be a suitable/possible plan?....

    About 2" out from the T coupling, cut the pipe. The 2" leaves room to attach the shielded coupling i'll use later. From inside of the house, through the wall, elbow, through the studs, and into the shielded coupling I replace all with PVC? After taking measurements I may leave more than 2" at the T so the length of pipe I need to feed through the hole in the studs is as short as possible, but you get my point. I would definitely like to avoid cutting the supply line if possible.

    Again, thanks so much for setting my feet on the ground to move forward.

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member bluebinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Santa Clara, CA
    Posts
    354

    Default

    Personally, I'd stay with copper...

    Are you comfortable sweating coper pipe?

    Is the pipe going into the wall on the left going to a valve under a sink? It looks to me like you have plenty of room and should not have to cut the studs.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member ZE496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I wouldn't necessarily say I was comfortable sweating pipe, but i've done a couple of small projects around the house. The work wouldn't win any beauty awards, but no leaks, and it's held. I do get a bit nervous with flames around studs, and the like.

    Yes, the pipe on the left Ts off the a valve under the sink. I can't see without removing more siding where it goes up, but when I run my hand up the pipe I can feel that the diameter of the pipe gets larger right after the valve. It's dark out right now, so can't tell you where the pipe goes downward....i'm assuming it ties in somewhere to get back to the water heater. It's also a little rainy, so I have the entire area covered in plastic tucked under the siding at the top.

    Is that increase in the diameter going up some kind of expansion bulb or something? Sorry if that is a dumb question, i'm kind of new at plumbing. But I noticed something like that in the access to the shower works upstairs.

    If I have to cut that supply line, I have to do what I have to do, but i'd like to avoid it. Plus, i'd like to avoid getting into a mess where it carries over more than one day, the wife would not be happy. I'm sure someone with more experienced that wouldn't happen. But for a rookie a lot of time could be spent scratching my head, mustering courage to get-at-er, and heading back to the store for something....although I do try to get more than I need before I start and just return anything later that I didn't need.

    .......

    Okay, I just went out and measured the best I could given the low light and such.

    It appears the total length of the pipe with the split is 16 1/4 ". It's difficult to get an accurate because of the studs. But I believe that also includes the total length including where it goes into the T on the right and the elbow on the left.

    The distance between the four stud set and the next stud to the left is a mere 14".
    The distance from the studs to the hot water supply line is about 10".

    Man, that's tight. I haven't measured from the four stud set to where it Ts off to the right. I'd like to avoid involving the T junction if at all possible.
    Last edited by ZE496; 11-27-2012 at 03:36 PM.

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,405

    Default

    In those tight spaces, if you aren't aware of them, they do make a repair coupling. This looks like a coupling to connect two pipes together, but instead of having a stop in the middle to limit how far the pipe can go (and center the thing on the two pipes), it has no stop in the middle. SO, you slide it entirely over one pipe, position it back and align it with the other, then slide the coupling so it is (approximately) centered between the two pipes, then solder it in place. You want your pipe ends cut straight, but you should also cut them so they are close to a butt fit (a small gap is fine) before you slide the repair coupling over them. The magic with solder connections is clean, flux, heat the fitting, not the pipe, and don't overheat it and burn all of the flux out. Not all fluxes are created equal - one of the easier ones to use is a tinning flux, it has powdered solder in it to give it a start and flow before you add solder to complete the connection. They also make a spray fire retardant you can spray on the wood and a flame shield to help keep from burning the house down! Keep a fire extinquisher handy or a garden hose. An ember can start a fire hours later after you've left. Best to be safe rather than sorry.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

Similar Threads

  1. how tight/loose to hang copper pipe?
    By Lakee911 in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-09-2012, 07:15 PM
  2. Existing PVC pipe a bit oval, too tight for new fitting... what to do?
    By vivona in forum Irrigation / Sprinkler Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-24-2010, 07:06 PM
  3. Installing coupling/pipe/bend in a tight space
    By nc8861 in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-24-2008, 10:24 PM
  4. soldering a slip coupling tight spot
    By billmad in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 05-07-2007, 01:51 PM
  5. Cracked PVC pipe tight against pool wall
    By mikemny in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-11-2007, 08:07 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •