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Thread: New well

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    DIY Junior Member Andy88's Avatar
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    Default New well

    I've been asked to install a new submersible pump in a new well. I don't know much about pumps size, but here is what information I have been given. New well 600' deep, 5" casing, water at 200', 157gpm well produces, want to set pump at 350' and pump water into a 3,000 gal.tank near well head for irrigation and drinking in the future there will be a larger tank set a elevation of 80' above well head at unknown distance. We're lookig to get 40 to 50 gpm at 50 psi. If these goals are posible what size pump and brand is good. Thanks any information you can gave will be helpful.

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    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    If you are using 50 GPM, a 3,000 gallon storage tank won't last 6 minutes. If the well will make 150 GPM, you don't need a storage tank. You just need a pump system in the well that will produce any amount of water you want at 50 PSI. If the pumping level is about 250', you need a 50 GPM, 7.5 HP pump. With and 80 gallon pressre tank and a CSV3B2T Cycle Stop Valve, you could use from anywhere from 5 to 50 GPM at 50 PSI constant.

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    DIY Junior Member Andy88's Avatar
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    Thanks Valveman. I've got some new numbers I would like you to look at, the 3,000 gal tank will be used for irrigation just to get some trees started on the property. The tank will be at well level and use a booster pump to raise the pressure. In the future I want set a 10,000 gal. tank 300' away at 80' elevation. These are the new numbers I was talking about.
    Well size 5"
    Static level 60'
    Well yield 157 gpm
    Pumping level 280'
    Pump depth 350'
    Well depth 600'
    Tank size 10,000
    120/240 volt 1ph available
    It has been suggested that a Goulds 3 wire, 2hp 13 gpm mod.#13gs20412c would work, what do you think? If I use a higher gpm and hp pump would I gain anything?
    Thanks for your time, Andy88

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    DIY Senior Member VAWellDriller's Avatar
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    A 13GS20 is a poor pick for this application. Listen to Valvemans first post, though if you have accurate information about the pump test, 157 gpm from 280' , then it is a waste of time, pipe, and wire to set a pump any deeper than 280' at any flow rate less than that yield. Your pumping information indicates a specfic capacity of 0.7 gpm/ft of drawdown, so we can estimate a pumping level of 131' at 50 gallons per minute. This would need to be checked. You could install a goulds 40GS50, on 8 joints of 2" steel pipe (168'), with the 2" cycle stop, eliminate the tank and booster pump (assuming your max demand is <50-60 gpm).

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    DIY Junior Member pumppal's Avatar
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    To pump water to a storage tank, you don't have to choose a pump with flow rate that is equal to the water consumption rate. In your case, how to choose a pump is more depending on how the water is consumes. 3000 gallon water consuming at 50gpm last 1 hour while 1000 gallons at 50gpm last 3.3 hours, not even considering the pump continue refilling the tank. If each irrigation time takes less than 1 hour and allow enough time for the tank to be refilled before the next irrigation started, using a smaller pump can do the job and save much money. Pumping to a storage tank does not need to consider the discharge pressure but to consider a pump working in its most efficiency head.
    Tuhorse North America has a Total Dynamic Head (TDH) Calculator that helps to choose a pump. Based on your information provided, I recommend these models.
    1) TH4-BF-11 , this is a 3HP pump, it pumps 32gpm in your application. Check it out at http://www.tuhorse.us/on-sale/3hp-th...-230v-1-phase/
    2) TH4-VC-10, this is a 2HP pump, it pumps 21gpm, http://www.tuhorse.us/TH4-VC-10/
    3) TH4-A-10 , 1.5HP, pumps 17gpm for your application.

    The above calculations are based on using 1.5” PVC pipe. Pump to the 1000 gallon tank 80 feet above the well head with 300ft incline.

  6. #6
    DIY Member bcpumpguy's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pumppal View Post
    To pump water to a storage tank, you don't have to choose a pump with flow rate that is equal to the water consumption rate. In your case, how to choose a pump is more depending on how the water is consumes. 3000 gallon water consuming at 50gpm last 1 hour while 1000 gallons at 50gpm last 3.3 hours, not even considering the pump continue refilling the tank. If each irrigation time takes less than 1 hour and allow enough time for the tank to be refilled before the next irrigation started, using a smaller pump can do the job and save much money. Pumping to a storage tank does not need to consider the discharge pressure but to consider a pump working in its most efficiency head.
    Tuhorse North America has a Total Dynamic Head (TDH) Calculator that helps to choose a pump. Based on your information provided, I recommend these models.
    1) TH4-BF-11 , this is a 3HP pump, it pumps 32gpm in your application. Check it out at http://www.tuhorse.us/on-sale/3hp-th...-230v-1-phase/
    2) TH4-VC-10, this is a 2HP pump, it pumps 21gpm, http://www.tuhorse.us/TH4-VC-10/
    3) TH4-A-10 , 1.5HP, pumps 17gpm for your application.

    The above calculations are based on using 1.5 PVC pipe. Pump to the 1000 gallon tank 80 feet above the well head with 300ft incline.
    Just wondering pumppal? where is the csa or c ul or ul certicication on the pumps that you are trying to peddle here?

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    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Man my math is bad. 3,000 divided by 50 is 60 minutes, not 6 minutes. Anyway, going to a storage tank and using a booster pump will take more pumps, use more horsepower, and have more components to maintain than if just pumping straight from the well.

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    DIY Junior Member Andy88's Avatar
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    Thanks for everybody input my main concern is getting pump that work on the future tank of 10,000 gals.

  9. #9
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    No matter the math, storing water in a cistern type tank creates unneeded problems. You have to chlorinate the water in the storage tank and you have to pump the same water twice. Two pumps combined will use 6 to 8 horsepower, when a good 5 HP in the well would do the entire job.

    With 157 GPM available, you can get 226,000 gallons per day straight from the well. What good is another 10,000 gallons in a storage tank? I would only use a cistern type storage tank if the well were a low producer, which yours is not.

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