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Thread: Double 14AWG wiring gauge

  1. #16
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefwong View Post
    NO.
    Doubling up, does not make it *half* the wire rating.
    Just don't do it often enough to know.
    Found the answer - Two 14's = 11 AWG
    I thought you were talking about size ?

    Jim is correct it is double in size.

    The size of stranded wire is different than solid.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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  2. #17
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefwong View Post
    Just making fancy speaker connections with my WBT crimp sleeves....

    Don't start the bare copper vs. connector debate ;-/
    Why would you want to parallel conductors for speakers? This is a very bad idea due to the resistance of the conductors that will have an effect on the amp.

    I always use stranded conductors for speakers due to eddie currents and would never for any reason install parallel conductors for any type of sound system.

    What size amp are you using? It must be big in order to use #14 AWG conductors.

  3. #18
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    One may notice from that code quote on big conductors that a 50% increase in size brings only a 15% increase in conductivity. Is this the flow of electrons on the perimeter of the cable factor?

    Seems like the parallel cables would give more heat dispersing area...

  4. #19
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    One may notice from that code quote on big conductors that a 50% increase in size brings only a 15% increase in conductivity. Is this the flow of electrons on the perimeter of the cable factor?

    Seems like the parallel cables would give more heat dispersing area...

    In theory X 2 or 100% increase would give the wire 1/2 of the resistance and 1/2 of the voltage drop for the same length wire run.

    1/2 of the voltage drop would produce less heat, but there are a lot of other factors that affect wire temperature.

    When it comes to Audio and Paralleling speaker wires, Phasing is important.

    1 speaker can cancel the sound of another if not properly phased.


    I guess chefwong is hanging speakers with this wire, as he said "This is not for electrical....."
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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  5. #20
    IBEW Electrician big2bird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    For a guy with several miles of #6 and #10 wire, "doubling up" seems like a great use of material. I have done it on some wild mountain runs, and all works fine. Without any code babble, can you explain the practical danger inherent in parallel wires?
    When you use multiple runs to increase conductance, you must insure the impedence (total opposition to a/c current) is virtually identical. If they are not, you risk the overloading of the conductor with the least opposition to current flow.
    Therefore, a run of 1/0 minimum, identical length, identical connections is the minimum. It would be too difficult and unnecessary to ever do that for smaller circuits.
    When you get into kiloamps, it becomes necessary, as no practical cable is manufactured or easily installed.
    There are exceptions for voltage drop, such as high frequency applications, but the ampacity cannot be summed. I.E., you could parallel 14 gauge wire on a 400 cycle circuit to lower voltage drop, but it is still rated at 15 amperes maximum.
    I can rattle off more, or quote the exceptions if interested.

  6. #21
    IBEW Electrician big2bird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    One may notice from that code quote on big conductors that a 50% increase in size brings only a 15% increase in conductivity. Is this the flow of electrons on the perimeter of the cable factor?

    Seems like the parallel cables would give more heat dispersing area...
    Skin effect has some factor. Basic rule of thumb. Copper is good for 1,000 amperes per 1" square cross section. Aluminum is 700 amperes per 1" cross section.

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