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Thread: Double 14AWG wiring gauge

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member chefwong's Avatar
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    Default Double 14AWG wiring gauge

    Two 14's double up = how many gauge.
    12 gauge or 11 gauge.


    This is not for electrical.....
    I'm need to buy a crimp connector sleeve and need to determine it based on a doubled up 14awg

  2. #2
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    There is no cross reference. You'd have to use the tables in the back of the NEC to get the actual diameter of the conductors.

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Gauge
    Inches (decimal)
    Inches (fractional)
    Millimeters
    20
    .032
    approx. 1/32"
    .812
    18
    .040
    > 1/32"
    1.024
    16
    .051
    < 1/16"
    1.291
    14
    .064
    approx. 1/16"
    1.628
    12
    .081
    > 1/16"
    2.053
    10
    .102
    < 1/8"
    2.588
    8
    .128
    approx. 1/8"
    3.264
    6
    .162
    > 1/8"
    4.115
    4
    .204
    < 1/4"
    5.189
    2
    .258
    approx 1/4"
    6.544
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Very handy chart, can you get a few more larger sizes under the 2?

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member chefwong's Avatar
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    How does that translate to combined. For example, I know the quad 16ag I use, the combined dual 16's = 13AWG

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    0
    .325
    5/16"
    8.251
    00
    .365
    approx. 3/8"
    9.266
    000
    .410
    7/16"
    11.110
    0000
    .500
    1/2"
    12.710
    9/16"
    .563
    9/16"
    14.287
    5/8"
    .630
    5/8"
    15.875
    3/4"
    .750
    3/4"
    19.050
    7/8"
    .875
    7/8"
    22.225
    1"
    1.000
    1"
    25.400
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefwong View Post
    How does that translate to combined. For example, I know the quad 16ag I use, the combined dual 16's = 13AWG
    Don't know, but it seems like two 16g (each 0.051") would need an opening twice that, or a 10g capability (0.102").
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member chefwong's Avatar
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    NO.
    Doubling up, does not make it *half* the wire rating.
    Just don't do it often enough to know.
    Found the answer - Two 14's = 11 AWG

  9. #9
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefwong View Post
    NO.
    Doubling up, does not make it *half* the wire rating.
    Just don't do it often enough to know.
    Found the answer - Two 14's = 11 AWG
    I am not sure what you are trying but unless you show a reference to what you say I disagree.

    Two 14 AWG equals two 14 AWG as far as the code is concerned. And they can not be connected in parallel

    Would you mind explaining just what you are doing please.

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member BobL43's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefwong View Post
    Two 14's double up = how many gauge.
    12 gauge or 11 gauge.


    This is not for electrical.....
    I'm need to buy a crimp connector sleeve and need to determine it based on a doubled up 14awg
    If it's not for electrical application, then you are using this to do what, hang a picture?
    Two conductors twisted and fastened d to a crimp type connector? Just twist them and measure the OD and pick from Jim's chart?
    I am definitely not a pro plumber, but I am a pro crastinator

  11. #11
    DIY Senior Member chefwong's Avatar
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    Just making fancy speaker connections with my WBT crimp sleeves....

    Don't start the bare copper vs. connector debate ;-/

  12. #12
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post
    I am not sure what you are trying but unless you show a reference to what you say I disagree.

    Two 14 AWG equals two 14 AWG as far as the code is concerned. And they can not be connected in parallel

    Would you mind explaining just what you are doing please.
    For a guy with several miles of #6 and #10 wire, "doubling up" seems like a great use of material. I have done it on some wild mountain runs, and all works fine. Without any code babble, can you explain the practical danger inherent in parallel wires?

  13. #13
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    Without any code babble, can you explain the practical danger inherent in parallel wires?
    I am not an engineer (thankfully), all I know is 310.4, then 310.10(H) says we CANNOT parallel conductors under 1/0.
    Here is the NEC Handbook commentary on it:

    Conductors connected in parallel, in accordance with 310.10(H), are treated by the Code as a single conductor with a total cross-sectional area of all conductors in parallel. The use of parallel conductors is a practical and cost effective means of installing large-capacity feeders or services. Using conductors larger than 1000 kcmil in raceways is neither economical nor practical unless the conductor size is governed by voltage drop. The ampacity of larger sizes would increase very little in proportion to the increase in the size of the conductor. Where the cross-sectional area of a conductor increases 50 percent (e.g., from 1000 to 1500 kcmil), a Type THW conductor ampacity increases only 80 amperes (less than 15 percent). A 100 percent increase (from 1000 to 2000 kcmil) causes an increase of only 120 amperes (approximately 2 percent). Generally, where cost is a factor, installation of two (or more) paralleled conductors per phase may be beneficial.

    The parallel connection of two or more conductors in place of using one large conductor depends on compliance with 310.10(H)(2) to ensure equal current division in order to prevent overloading any of the individual paralleled conductors.

    Where individual conductors are tapped from conductors in parallel, the tap connection must include all the conductors in parallel for that particular phase. Tapping into only one of the parallel conductors would result in unbalanced distribution of tap load current between parallel conductors, resulting in one of the conductors carrying more than its share of the load, which could cause overheating and conductor insulation failure. For example, if a 250-kcmil conductor is tapped from a set of two 500-kcmil conductors in parallel, the splicing device must include both 500-kcmil conductors and the single 250-kcmil tap conductor.
    310.10(H)(2) commentary:
    To avoid excessive voltage drop and also to ensure equal division of current, it is essential that different phase conductors be located close together and that each phase conductor, grounded conductor, and the grounding conductor (if used) be grouped together in each raceway or cable. However, isolated phase installations are permitted underground where the phase conductors are run in nonmetallic raceways that are in close proximity.

    The impedance of a circuit in an aluminum raceway or aluminum-sheathed cable differs from the impedance of the same circuit in a steel raceway or steel-sheathed cable; therefore, separate raceways and cables must have the same physical characteristics. Also, the same number of conductors must be used in each raceway or cable. See 300.20 regarding induced currents in metal enclosures or raceways.

    All conductors of the same phase or neutral are required by 310.10(H)(2) to be of the same conductor material. For example, if 12 conductors are paralleled for a 3-phase, 4-wire, 480Y/277-volt ac circuit, 4 conductors could be installed in each of three raceways. The Code does not intend that all 12 conductors be copper or aluminum but does intend that the individual conductors in parallel for each phase, grounded conductor, and neutral be the same material, insulation type, length, and so on. Also, the three raceways are intended to have the same physical characteristics (e.g., three rigid aluminum conduits, three steel IMC conduits, three EMTs, or three nonmetallic conduits), not a mixture (e.g., two rigid aluminum conduits and one rigid steel conduit).

    The presence of the word polarity throughout the section specifically allows the inclusion of dc circuits.

    Since you say you hacked in a "wild mountain run" I am sure those looking to circumvent this part of the code will feel much better about themselves, as I am sure you do.

  14. #14
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    For a guy with several miles of #6 and #10 wire, "doubling up" seems like a great use of material. I have done it on some wild mountain runs, and all works fine. Without any code babble, can you explain the practical danger inherent in parallel wires?
    heat .

  15. #15
    DIY Senior Member chefwong's Avatar
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    Whoa. Doubling up in high voltage


    The only time I've ever doubled up is with speaker wiring & when I needed to cheat and provide power to a alarm panel.
    Four 24AWG (aka - cat5 cable) combined - is equivalent to 18 gauge. It was cutting it close but it was just enough gauge to make it work WITH COM working as well..

    Doubled up speakers in world is my stash of QUAD 16awg and Quad 14 AWG cable....
    Which I use either as a pair or quads depending on application of amplification
    Last edited by chefwong; 09-13-2012 at 06:27 PM.

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