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Thread: HELP Moving Toilet Drain

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  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member joewalsh1979's Avatar
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    Default HELP Moving Toilet Drain

    Hi everyone:

    I'm remodeling a 30+ year-old, second floor bathroom and trying to move a toilet drain a few inches from the wall to accomodate a Toto Supreme toilet (I have less than 12" from the finished wall to the drain's center line with the drain's current placement). I was hoping someone here can give me advice on how to proceed. The "best" idea I've come up with is pictured in my photo, but I'm unsure if re-routing the drain in relation to the vent is a no-no.

    I'm relatively inexperienced and trying to use this project to learn as much as I can. Can anyone here offer me some advice?

    Thanks for the help.

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  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    If you have slightly less than 12" to the center of the drain now, and I do not know how that is possible from the scale of the picture, doing that will make it around 17" to the center. In addition, you will have a major remodel job to connect the new toilet pipe to the main line. In fact, it is probably not a good DIY job, especially a first one.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    What's the current measurement? A regular Toto Drake (not Drake II) will work on 11" from finished wall to center of drain. You measure from where the finished wall will be to the center of the drain, ignoring molding and such. Toto also makes a Drake that will go on a 10" rough-in. Toto also has certain toilets (many "skirted" ones), like the Carlyle II, which use a "unifit" adapter to connect them to the floor, and thus can fit on a 10" rough-in (or 12" or 14").

    I don't know if you have the toilet already, but the Toto Carolina II looks like the Supreme II, except it is skirted and uses the Unifit adapter so it can go on a 10" rough-in.

    Give us some more info, and maybe we can save you some money.

    HJ is offering sage advice. Maybe better to change the commode (something you can do) than change that plumbing.
    Last edited by wjcandee; 09-08-2012 at 04:50 PM.

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Not sure where in the span you intend to run that 3" pipe (can't see the ends), but there are limitiations which include how big, where in the length, and how close to the edge you can do it. My guess is that you would not be able to run the pipe in the manner you wish without compromising the strength of the joists there beyond specs.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member joewalsh1979's Avatar
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    Thank you, everyone, for the responses, I greatly appreciate your time and willingness to help. To clarify the measurement and prove I'm not crazy, I attached another pic.

    HJ: I figured I might end up needing to hire a pro. I've had two contractors give me estimates on doing some of the work already: one of them told me the drains need to be moved, the other ignored it. The contractor who told me the drain must be moved, wanted to open up the ceiling downstairs to do it, so I'm hoping to at least get an idea of what to expect if I have to hire someone. I worry about having someone come in and slice everything up when it's unnecessary.

    WJ: I do already have the toilet, unfortunately, I guess. I didn't realize this would be such an issue, and the contractor I talked to told me the drain should be moved regardless. There are a few things in this bathroom that I know are not code compliant, and I figured that so long as I'm going to be dealing with some of it, I might as well try to address this too. You can probably tell from the section of the subfloor that's remaining, but the old toilet had leaked quite a bit, which I thought could've been due to a slight tilt from the lack of space from drain to wall.

    Jadnashua: The floor joists are 12" on center, and I was hoping to avoid touching any of them. Right now, all the 3" pipe has been run by notching the ceiling joists below, rather than the floor joists. Those ceiling joists below span 15'6" originating just to the in the right side of the frame in my original photo. I can give more measurements if I'm misunderstanding you.

    Anyway, I'll gladly take any additional input you guys are willing to offer. After reading everyone's responses, I'm thinking I'll be speaking with more pros this week, but any ideas you have on a proper solution will definitely be helpful to me and appreciated.

    Thanks again,
    Joe

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  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    A wooden joist is similar to an I-beam...most of its strength is in the top and bottom few inches...the middle just holds them in the proper location. Notching either the top or bottom makes the joist the equivilent of what's left...it is not allowed! The top is in compression and the bottom is in tension...then, there are rules how close to the ends where you can place holes. the ends get compressed by the walls, and holes there are not allowed. That's why I asked where in the span you wanted to place that pipe crossing multiple joists. The hole is only supposed to be in the middle 1/3-rd or so of the joist vertically, and in the middle section lengthwise. Put a 3" notch in a 10" joist,and it is somewhat less than a 7" joist. Put a 3" hole in the middle of a 10" joist, and it's still a 10" joist strengthwise.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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