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Thread: Rough in

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member afrye707's Avatar
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    Default Rough in

    I am doing the rough in plumbing in my barn for a bathroom (vanity, toilet, shower) my questions are how close should I bring my 4" main waste line to my first 3" wye or does it not matter? Can I have a elongated 90 in my main 3" line, I need to go 4" to a 4" 45 then my 3" needs a 3" 90 all in slab or should I avoid 90's until in put my pipes up my wall? I am currently working on a layout in my head that I will poast later.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    It doesn't matter, and you use the "correct" fittings you need to do the job.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    DIY Junior Member afrye707's Avatar
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    What would be a correct fittings? when drawing my layout I feel like I should have as little to no 90's and 45's in any of my 3" pipe or 4" main waste line if possible.

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    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    You have whatever you need to make the system work.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    If you want to fix a faucet, this is where to come. If you want to do an entire DWV system, that is a different matter. I have NEVER seen a DIYer install a proper system by just asking for a description. In fact some of the worst abortions I have seen have been when they worked from a correct drawing, but decided to interpret it the easy way.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    DIY Junior Member afrye707's Avatar
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    I am not a DIYer. I run a HVAC company that specializes in radiant flooring or hydronic heat. I just wanted to ask those two questions here in my drawing I don't think a DIYer would be able to draw this. I have two options send the pipe through my footing with no joints or extend my pipe down making me install a swiping 90 and a 45 but drilling through only a couple inches of cement. All I am asking is what would you do? Name:  Pipe diag.jpg
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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    The only change I would make on the drawing would be to switch out the 2x1.5 santee for a combo on the shower.

    Or to tweak it better, to run the 2" arm closer to the wall that the vent goes up, and keep the vent at a 45 or better, and arm back out for the drain.
    Last edited by Terry; 09-06-2012 at 10:33 AM.

  8. #8
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    The shower vent is running flat also which is a no no
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  9. #9
    DIY Junior Member afrye707's Avatar
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    All my pipes slope 1/4" per foot of pipe my vent will also rise 1/4" per foot up then 90 up my wall. Is that what you are talking about?

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    DIY Junior Member afrye707's Avatar
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    Thanks terry I will draw it up with your suggestion and any others.

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    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    Vents have to rise vertically until they are 6" above the flood level rim of the highest fixture served which is usually about 46" above the floor. Personally, I'd probably not do anything you have drawn there. I would wet vent the entire bathroom through a single 1-1/2 pipe
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  12. #12
    DIY Junior Member afrye707's Avatar
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    This drawing is for the downstairs upstairs I will have a 2nd bathroom with the same set-up plus a kitchen with dishwasher and sink, and a stub out for a wash machine. Would it be ok to wet vent everything but the shower? Or just wet vent it all like you said?

  13. #13
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    that depends on your trap to vent distances. You can only wet vent a bath group though (no washers or kitchen sinks etc) and you can only wet vent on one branch interval
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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