(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 61 to 73 of 73

Thread: Iron staining, Sulfur smell, water options

  1. #61
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Jordan View Post
    I assume the tubing in my picture above is PEX? It did not look quite like the PEX piping at the store, it appears more rigid to me than the stuff at the store. I see an identifying mark of PEX1006? on some of the piping but nothing else that makes any sense to me. It appears to be just over 1" outside diameter and the fittings appear to be in the range of .8" so it must be the 1" PEX if it is PEX tubing.
    Man... yes it is PEX and it says PEX on it and you're still questioning. Deep breath and change your thinking to how to do the plumbing and you'll feel better shortly.

    3/4" PEX (copper, CPVC) has a 7/8" OD, 1" will be about 1.25".


    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Jordan View Post
    I was looking at the Fleck bypass valve and the opening looks ridiculously small when set to the service position.

    This seems like it would be a huge bottleneck to water flow?

    Maybe next time I embark on a plumbing adventure I'll just hire a plumber!
    You are worrying about nothing, you'll never notice the "bottleneck" you imagine. When water comes to a restriction in its flow, it speeds up through the restriction and then slows back down. The restriction in the BP valve is very smooth and causes no noticeable loss of flow.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  2. #62
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,934

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    I don't know what you are calling "poly" but here in the US it refers to polyethylene (PE) pipe.

    So the ID is maintained and the OD is whatever it is due to the pressure rating/wall thickness. Which is what I said before....

    Again, PEX is normally tubing and the OD is maintained and the ID is whatever due to the pressure rating/wall thickness.

    The OD on PE may vary because with PE the ID needs to be consistant because the fittings for PE go inside the pipe. PE is the only pipe I know of that uses insert fittings.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  3. #63
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Sawyer View Post
    The OD on PE may vary because with PE the ID needs to be consistant because the fittings for PE go inside the pipe. PE is the only pipe I know of that uses insert fittings.
    The OD varies based on the pressure rating and the consistent ID allows the use of insert fittings because of the semi-flexible nature of PE pipe.

    Plus there is a lot of PE tubing that uses compression fittings but not insert fittings.

    And PEX, because of it also being semi-flexible like PE pipe and PE tubing, it can use both insert and compression fittings.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  4. #64
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,934

    Default

    PE or HDPE is Polyethylene or high density polyethylene pipe of which the outside diameter may vary and does not matter because the fittings go inside the pipe. I believe that PE and HDPE are the only piping systems that use insert fittings except for pex. Sharkbite fittings and similar fittings like John Guest etc will not fit on PE or HDPE pipe. The only other pipe that is commonly called "poly" would be Polybutlyene which does have a standard outside diameter same as pex or copper or cpvc.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  5. #65
    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,707
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    Man... yes it is PEX and it says PEX on it and you're still questioning. Deep breath and change your thinking to how to do the plumbing and you'll feel better shortly.

    3/4" PEX (copper, CPVC) has a 7/8" OD, 1" will be about 1.25".



    You are worrying about nothing, you'll never notice the "bottleneck" you imagine. When water comes to a restriction in its flow, it speeds up through the restriction and then slows back down. The restriction in the BP valve is very smooth and causes no noticeable loss of flow.
    Gary said it perfectly. A short bottleneck will lower the systems potential maximum flow, but the bypass has a maximum flow in excess of 30 GPM, the systems, valves etc typically max out at the 10-15 GPM range. Also, the boot will flex out of the way considerably more than shown in your picture. Your concerns are excellent, but nothing to worry about. The velocity (speed) of the water will increase in this section of the bypass, but you will not notice any reduction flow. Plumbing is designed with velocities in mind, and the common maximum is 8 feet per second. The flow may increase to 20 FPS inside that bypass, but only at higher flow rates, in excess of 10 GPM.

    Most people never even notice the stainless bypass flow port size. This bypass design has been in use for may decades, with millions installed, you will be fine. Now if your house is plumbed in 1-1/4" or larger, I would not recommend this bypass, but Fleck does make a 1-1/4" sweat adapter for it.

  6. #66
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Sawyer View Post
    PE or HDPE is Polyethylene or high density polyethylene pipe of which the outside diameter may vary and does not matter because the fittings go inside the pipe. I believe that PE and HDPE are the only piping systems that use insert fittings except for pex. Sharkbite fittings and similar fittings like John Guest etc will not fit on PE or HDPE pipe. The only other pipe that is commonly called "poly" would be Polybutlyene which does have a standard outside diameter same as pex or copper or cpvc.
    Yeah all pipe has a variable OD and consistent ID and all tubing has a consistent OD and the ID varies.

    PB/polybutlyene is semi flexible tubing, as is PE and PEX so the OD is consistent and the ID varies. PB used both insert and compression fittings as all other semi flexible plastic tubing does. Metal and rigid plastic tubing (copper, CPVC) or pipe (steel, PVC) can not use insert fittings.

    Or, you are wrong if you mistakenly think PE pipe was invented just so it could use insert fittings. PE tubing uses insert and/or compression fittings, although PE tubing is not used for pressurized water distribution lines.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  7. #67
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,934

    Default

    I believe that originally PE was designed to be butt fusion welded but there are other methods that will join it also including a variety of exterior clamp type couplings and other fittings that use a rubber gasket in compression to make the seal. You can not legally use PE or HDPE withing the structure for pressurized water distribution. PE variants are also being used for gas distrubution and gas mains. Many localaties have switched from ductile iron for water mains to HDPE (butt fusion welded) with the distribution laterals also being HDPE and run to the inside of the house, directly to the water meter. We have been using PE for water pumps for many years.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  8. #68
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Yeah I didn't mention that stuff because I was talking residential water lines.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  9. #69
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,934

    Default

    Well good then. I think all the bases have been covered
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  10. #70
    DIY Junior Member Bobby Jordan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Well I finally got all the fittings and installed it today. It took probably 2 1/2 hours once all was said and done. I've still got a microscopic leak coming from one of the fittings that goes into the bypass valve, but it's literally like one drip every 5 minutes.... so I'm not worried about it right now.

    Smell is gone from cold water line, haven't really ran much hot water but I understand it will probably take a few days to cycle the water in the water heater.

    I haven't backwashed the carbon and didn't really let it soak all that long, which I read it was ideal to let it soak for awhile before putting it into operation. I ran a faucet until it ran clear. The discharge was blackish for probably 5-10 minutes.

    The only "weird" thing I've noticed is that the water actually tastes "dry." It's kinda strange. I'm guessing it will take a few days or a week for everything to get up and normalized.

    You guys were a ton of help. If you lived nearby I'd take you for coffee or a beer

  11. #71
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    That water drip will probably stop on its own if it is on the inlet side of the BP.

    Carbon, and all other types of filters and softeners really need to be in the backwash cycle position as the water is turned on during installation and before running water through the bed. Running water to a faucet compacts the bed trapping 'fines' etc.. You do one piece of equipment after the other by putting other backwashed or regenerated equipment past the one you're filling in by pass.

    Thanks. I'd go for a beer or two but ya gotta watch Tom, the word is that he's been known to get emotional after a couple adult beverages.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  12. #72
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,934

    Default

    Tom hasn't had a drink in thirty years or so but......I have to admit that at times, sparring with you makes me think about that decision. So how was your summer? They say it was pretty darn hot out your way. Are you staying for the winter or heading for Florida?
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  13. #73
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Yeah I'm not buying that 30 years, but we have been in FL since spring checking out the water treatment businesses around Ocala ya know. Once I'm done here in a few months, we will be headed west to become Texans (again). Maybe open me another business and then head west to the high country for the summer. Or....
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

Similar Threads

  1. Help Deciding Best Way to Get Rid of Sulfur Smell. Iron filter or Chlorine? Other?
    By carfan87 in forum Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and reviews
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-17-2011, 06:12 AM
  2. Too much staining from iron in well water
    By Golfsupttdd in forum Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-03-2008, 08:16 AM
  3. Sewer/Sulfur Smell From Isolated Shower - City Water
    By kucharskimb in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-29-2008, 04:15 PM
  4. New water heater:strong sulfur smell
    By coffyguy in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 02-05-2008, 02:26 PM
  5. Can Sulfur smell and iron be removed with a softner
    By Texaro in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 06-11-2007, 07:40 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •