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Thread: Sump Pump and Upflush Toilet All In One?

  1. #1

    Default Sump Pump and Upflush Toilet All In One?

    We have to replace an upflush toilet in the basement of a condo we just purchased. Currently the toilet sits on a platform along with shower stall and sink unit. There is a sump pump located just behind the toilet wall which gets gray water from the shower and sink. I was wondering if we could install an upflush toilet system grinder tank where the sump pump is located and which would collect the water from the shower/tub/sink as well as waste from the toilet? The current sump pump is 30 years old - open at the top. There is an odor from the gray water. Can we just run all waste into a sealed container grinder/pump built for an upflush toilet and put it in the same place the current sump pump is located? Thanks for any advice on how to proceed. Catswan

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Where does the current sump pump discharge? Does it actually have ground water to discharge as well? Do you have city sewer or a septic system?

    In many places it is not allowed to discharge a sump pump (ground water) into the city sewer. It also isn't a great idea to discharge it into your septic system - depending on the circumstances, the flow could be significant and overload the system. What you have probably does not meet current code. My unprofessional opinion.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3

    Default Sump and Pump

    Thanks Jim for replying to my question.
    The sump discharges into city sewer.
    The only water that feeds into it is from a shower and bathroom sink, according to my house inspector.
    No ground water that I know of (if you mean by groundwater water that floods into the basement). I've been trying to find out if there is a good sump pump that will handle both sewage and (effluent? - is that the right word? ie: soapy water from shower/sink). If this is possible - can you recommend any to me? Thank you again.
    Blessings. catswan

  4. #4

    Default Assuming

    Dear Jim:
    Upon reading your message again, I may be making a wrong assumption. I am assuming the sump pump discharges into city sewer, since its purpose is to drain used water from sink/shower. I may be wrong about that - I am a total amateur - where do sump pumps usually drain? I will ask the plumber when he comes to check things out. He should know if the sump drains into the sewer, and if our city codes allow homeowners to put both upflush and used water from shower/sink together. catswan

  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    All of the greywater and sewage from the house can go into the sewer. In many places, (typically a sump pump is for ground water...naming conventions what you are talking about is an ejection pump) you can not dump the output from a sump pump (groundwater) into a sewer. If they are using a sump pump and open pit for the greywater, I doubt it meets code now. Especially if that sump is open on the bottom (i.e., it has drain pipes coming into it to drain ground water).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member Habitat.pat's Avatar
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    Getting back to the original question, yes, there are combination toilets/pumps that are intended for retrofitting a bathroom into a basement, below sewer pipe level. I don't have a brand name right now, but I see adds in the Journal of Light Construction or Fine Homebuilding for them in almost every issue. They are made in Europe, and are not cheap! The waste lines from the sink and tub enter a tank in the base of the toilet, so that means that they need to be above the floor - at least that is how they are shown. It looks as if the whole system is above the floor so you don't have to break up the floor to install the bathroom.

    I just looked through a copy of JLC and didn't see an ad. Bummer.

    Pat

  7. #7
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Get yourself a Grainger catalog and look at what is available and the prices for same.

    Check the head and flow capacity of your current pump system and at least match it.

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