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Thread: Two pipe jet pump for drilled well

  1. #1

    Default Two pipe jet pump for drilled well

    I have a drilled well about 125' deep setup with a two pipe 1/2hp jet pump in the cellar.
    Pipes enter steel casing through sanitary cap 2-'3' feet underground (actually in the old stone dug well which has been filled in).
    I wish to raise the casing above grade so what is the best way to handle the pitless setup? Do you use two adapters? Have not seena good diagram of this setup. I was going to use something like a Merrell compression seal for casing extension with 6" pvc unless there is another way. I know welding is prefered with steel. I also am going to lower the two pipe further in the ground.
    Thanks Again,
    Steve

  2. #2
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    You can get a two pipe pitless adapter for steel or PVC casing. You really need to weld on to the steel casing, even if you just weld on threads so you can thread on a PVC female adapter to glue onto. The casing needs to be sealed water tight however you do it.

  3. #3

    Default Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    You can get a two pipe pitless adapter for steel or PVC casing. You really need to weld on to the steel casing, even if you just weld on threads so you can thread on a PVC female adapter to glue onto. The casing needs to be sealed water tight however you do it.
    Understood. Thats why I want to raise it up as we are also changing grade near the well. Will check out the cycle stop sounds like that would help my system for sure.

  4. #4
    In the Trades Texas Wellman's Avatar
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    Why not just go with a submersible pump? You'll be much happier with the performance.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member craigpump's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Wellman View Post
    Why not just go with a submersible pump? You'll be much happier with the performance.
    Or put in a Grundfos SQE constant pressure unit

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    In the Trades Texas Wellman's Avatar
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    Wait a minute, let me get my popcorn.

    BTW: Nice hoist. What's the make?

  7. #7
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Would you like Butter on your popcorn ?

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    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

  8. #8
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Wellman View Post
    Wait a minute, let me get my popcorn.
    Oh you can’t blame a fellow for falling for those SQE pumps. Grundfos only spends about 6 million a year marketing those things. They are certainly not going to tell you about all the problems. You can make a lot of money with those. But usually only for a short while until the customer figures it out and calls another pump man. Everybody has to find out the hard way. Hopefully before they lose too many customers and it puts them out of business.

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member zl700's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    Oh you canít blame a fellow for falling for those SQE pumps. Grundfos only spends about 6 million a year marketing those things. They are certainly not going to tell you about all the problems. You can make a lot of money with those. But usually only for a short while until the customer figures it out and calls another pump man. Everybody has to find out the hard way. Hopefully before they lose too many customers and it puts them out of business.
    My Grundfos SQE22 has been in service for 8 years, Im really happy with it
    If Payback is so important to you, why are you not driving a Toyota Corolla?

  10. #10
    In the Trades Texas Wellman's Avatar
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    Shows just starting!!

    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    Oh you can’t blame a fellow for falling for those SQE pumps. Grundfos only spends about 6 million a year marketing those things. They are certainly not going to tell you about all the problems. You can make a lot of money with those. But usually only for a short while until the customer figures it out and calls another pump man. Everybody has to find out the hard way. Hopefully before they lose too many customers and it puts them out of business.

  11. #11
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Wellman View Post
    Shows just starting!!
    LOL, I hope it has a good ending.Name:  popcorn.gif
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    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

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    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zl700 View Post
    My Grundfos SQE22 has been in service for 8 years, Im really happy with it
    The show must go on.

    I hear of a lot of those that have lasted 8 to 10 years. Usually these are on systems with an older couple, no kids, no sprinklers, no heat pump, and usually up north where the water temp is cooler.

    But for everyone that last 8 to 10 years, there is another somewhere that was replaced four times in two years. The more use they get and the warmer the water and air temp, the shorter the life expectancy. Really messes up the average, which is maybe three years.

    I was even told that Grundfos loses 6 million a year on warranty for these systems. It is part of their corporate charter or something to spend 6 million a year on R & D. And replacing SQE’s under warranty is the way they spend that 6 mil. Their variable speed technology is suppose to show that they are the smartest pump company in the world. But in my opinion it has the opposite effect, because of all the unhappy customers.

    I think it is a lot like the hybrid car. It looks like a cool idea, but few people who have had one would purchase another. And yeah, I drive a Corolla.

  13. #13
    DIY Senior Member craigpump's Avatar
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    I guess we've been lucky so far, we have had no issues yet. But I do have a ton of conventional submersibles that are less than 10 years old that are NFG if anyone is interested.

  14. #14
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Conventional pumps are designed to last an average of seven years. If you are using so called “properly sized pressure tanks” that deliver one minute of run time, you can pretty much count on seven years being spot on. Eliminate the cycling and the life of those pumps will be double or triple.

    I know I am on the opposite end of the spectrum from many people. The pump installers I talk to have already been through hell with those variable speed type pumps. By the time they call me they are having so many warranties or callbacks on those variable speed pumps that most are afraid it will put them out of business.

    Even the installers who say they are not having those issues will finally confess after a few questions. When asked they will say “well yes we have had to replace a few of those VFD controllers, maybe a pressure sensor or two, and come to think of it we have replaced a few pumps as well. When they stop and think about it, the problems start adding up quickly, even in a relatively short period of time.

    You just don’t want to be like the last couple I talked to, one from Oklahoma and another from Canada. Both of these guys had installed over a thousand variable speed type pumps. Now they are failing so fast all these guys are doing is warranty work, and don’t have time to do any paying jobs. One even said the pump manufacturer paid him $30,000 for a years worth of labor on warranties. He must be a really good customer because that is unheard of. Pump manufacturers are usually very adamant about not paying labor on warranty work.

    No matter if you can make them pay or not, VFD’s are not good for your reputation. The pump man always gets the blame, even when it is the fault of the product. I got tired of losing good customers over VFD problems, which is why I quit using VFD’s over twenty years ago. VFD’s and all the problems that go with are not new, just new to some people.

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