(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 28 of 28

Thread: Shower Mixing Valve Replacement Advice

  1. #16
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,216
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I can't look up the wall, but it looks like 3/4" air chambers to me. I bet they have caps on them and they are about 16" long.

    I would cut near the valve, and use couplings on the 1/2" pipe to the valve. It looks like you have some room to push the pipes apart there. You're almost done now.

  2. #17
    DIY Junior Member lkstaack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    I can't look up the wall, but it looks like 3/4" air chambers to me. I bet they have caps on them and they are about 16" long.

    I would cut near the valve, and use couplings on the 1/2" pipe to the valve. It looks like you have some room to push the pipes apart there. You're almost done now.
    Thanks, Terry. If I understand you correctly, the job will be alot easier than I thought.

    You are saying that I only need to cut the 1/2" pipe at the old valve and use couplings? I will be able to slide the couplings up the shower/tub pipes, so that is not an issue. However, you think that I will be able to bend the 3/4" pipes far enough to fit in the couplings in areas marked A and B on the attached pic? I'll only have about 1/2" of copper pipe coming off the 3/4" pipe after cutting off the old valve and another 1/2" coming from the new valve. Is that enough material to get a good solder connection?
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  3. #18
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,216
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I think you will find that when the pipe is cut, that you will be able to move the copper pipes enough to work on that. You may need some short pieces of pipe to make up the difference. You will want to remove the water in the line, maybe a vacuum will do that.

  4. #19
    DIY Junior Member lkstaack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    I think you will find that when the pipe is cut, that you will be able to move the copper pipes enough to work on that. You may need some short pieces of pipe to make up the difference. You will want to remove the water in the line, maybe a vacuum will do that.
    Thanks. Won't the water drain out of the cut pipes and open faucets inside the house?

  5. #20
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,216
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    It looks like the pipe dips down below the valve.

  6. #21
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,434

    Default

    Terry's point should be investigated! WHere does that pipe go when it goes up? If it is just a stub that is capped, it is a waste and you can eliminate it entirely. That would make it much easier.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #22
    DIY Junior Member lkstaack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    19

    Default Valve Fitting Advice

    I request valve fitting advice. As you can see, I've cut off the old valve and have around 1/2" clearance between the 4 pipes and the new valve. I was expecting to slide the couplings up the top and bottom pipes and then slide them down when the new valve is in place. However, the couplings don't want to go further than about 1/2 their length. Is this how you are supposed to fit the valve?
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  8. #23
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,216
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I would think that the pipes to the side will move outward, allowing insertion into the valve. You may need to go beyond the studs and work from the verticals coming down.
    The tub spout can go in last if needed.

    But you're committed now. Chop out whatever you need to get that thing in there.

  9. #24
    DIY Member jadziedzic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    86

    Default

    You are using couplings with a "stop" that prevents them from sliding more than half-way onto the pipe; get couplings without the stop (aka a "repair coupling") and you'll be all set. You'll have to be sure that the coupling is held in place (with a screwdriver perhaps) when you solder those joints so the coupling spans each pipe about the same amount.

  10. #25
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,434

    Default

    A repair coupling does not have a stop in the middle, so you can slide it anywhere you need, then slide it back to, ideally being centered around the two pieces of pipe. Keeping it there while soldering can sometimes be a pain, especially on the verticals so maybe a vice grip to hold it, or bend it slightly so it stays in place
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  11. #26
    DIY Junior Member lkstaack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    19

    Default Do I have to start over?

    I completed the valve installation only to find during pressure testing that I neglected to solder one each coupling joint to the tub and shower pipes. When I went back to solder the two joints, I found that the joints wouldn't suck in the solder. Did the leaking water affect the flux? What are my options besides starting over?

  12. #27
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,216
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Water will wash out the flux.
    No worries. Just disassemble, clean up, flux and solder.

    It's part of the learning process. We've all done that.

  13. #28
    DIY Junior Member lkstaack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    Water will wash out the flux.
    No worries. Just disassemble, clean up, flux and solder.

    It's part of the learning process. We've all done that.
    Crud. Assembly was a bitc*. Disassembly and reassembly will be a pain too. Well, like you said, its all part of the learning process. Thanks Terry.

Similar Threads

  1. Waterworks, Sigma, Can't identify faulty shower mixing valve?
    By johnsas in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-10-2013, 06:45 PM
  2. Bad Sterling Mixing Valve in Shower
    By Tleast in forum Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-28-2011, 07:14 PM
  3. Need new shower/tub mixing valve
    By Scuba_Dave in forum Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-26-2009, 11:17 AM
  4. Need to replace Shower mixing valve with separate cutoff valve for inputs.
    By OfficeLinebacker in forum Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 11-29-2006, 09:06 AM
  5. Pegasus mixing valve for shower.
    By canton in forum Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-20-2006, 04:22 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •