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Thread: Cut in T-Y

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member PapaFi's Avatar
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    Unhappy Cut in T-Y

    Hi to all!
    Have a 4" PVC stock in the basement. Want to cut in T -Y. Stock is rigid and doesn't look like I can move it. Need step-by step instruction.
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    DIY Junior Member PapaFi's Avatar
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    Just try to clear my question: do I have to play with T and one or two slip couplings or go the easiest way and install saddle?

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  4. #4
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Saddles are not good. Cut out some pipe, use no-stop couplings and/or steel banded rubber coupliings.\

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Saddles are neither good nor approved. Whatcolor is the pipe material? Green, white, or black?
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    DIY Senior Member bluebinky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    Saddles are neither good nor approved. Whatcolor is the pipe material? Green, white, or black?
    I thought you "liked" saddles

    Kidding aside, skip the saddle.

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member PapaFi's Avatar
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    It's PVC white.

  8. #8
    DIY Junior Member PapaFi's Avatar
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    Doesn't help: there is a 7' section of 4" pipe and I need to place a T just above the floor, so there is not enough free movement to spread ends of pipe to insert a T.
    It's why I'm looking to use one or two slip couplings also. The problem is the order in which to play that Tetris
    I also want to know how much time I have to slip the coupling over part of pipe after cement applied - really don't want to get coupling tackled in the middle of nowhere.

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    It's much easier, and also code approved, to use banded, no-hub connectors. The larger the pipe, the harder it is for a DIY'er to get a slip coupling where you want it before things solidify. If you loosen and slide the banded part, the rubber sleeve can be rolled or folded back on itself so you can insert the new fitting with stubs glued in each end, then fold the coupling back, slide the band over it, then tighten it up and that part's done. The nice thing is it gives you easy way to rotate the whole thing to get the angle just where you need it...just loosen the clamps, turn it, retighten. You can use repair couplings if you really want to, but it is unnecessary.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  10. #10
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Just be aware that Smock Man may try to sell you a neoprene sleeve with a clamp on each end. This are not approved for above ground connections. As Jim points out, get a banded, no hub. These are somewhat similar, but the clamp covers the entire piece not just the ends. This will give you a ridged connection.

  11. #11
    DIY Junior Member PapaFi's Avatar
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    Thanks! Looks like I need 2 no-hubs? I use to do it in NY on cast iron pipes. Never mentioned do the same on PVC. Going to check local ******* for the fittings.

  12. #12
    DIY Junior Member PapaFi's Avatar
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    So I need 2 no-hubs? Sounds great. I used to put no-hubs on cast-iron pipes and never mentioned do same on PVC. Thanks!
    I also have an other question. If I will use that T for sink drain and sink will be placed 3 or 4 feet away from the stock, do I need dedicated vent line?

  13. #13
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    If there are any fixtures draining into the stack from above, you cannot use it for a vent.

  14. #14
    DIY Junior Member PapaFi's Avatar
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    That is a main stock in the basement of 2-floor house so they are plenty fixtures above
    My I just run a vent line from drain line up to the basement ceiling and out trough the wall? Sorry if that sounds silly

  15. #15
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Running a vent outside, up the wall, is kind of hokey. You do not need a separate penetration through the roof, but if you can, you should run a new vent up either to at least 6" above the highest fixture, OR 42", whichever is higher. If you could run the new vent into the attic, you could reconnect to the existing vent there, or anywhere else that meets the provisions mentioned above.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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