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Thread: Did I do my wet vent bath group ok?

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member Chad Schloss's Avatar
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    Default Did I do my wet vent bath group ok?

    Well, I have been waiting to do this for awhile now. I am rehabbing the entire house, so this has been on a list of mine for some time now. I still need to run the lines from the far end of the house for the kitchen sink and washing machine drain. They will tie into the 4" cleanout heading out to the main drain. I have relocated a 4" cleanout on the left side of the double wye. Ontop of the wye sits the toilet, which i have to stub up yet. The right side of the wye accepts the drains from the tub and the bath vanity. I hope I got this right. I tested it all, no leaks overnight, tub drains nice and fast. 1.5" from tub drain to 2" p trap, 2" the rest of the way until the 4" wye. 2" vent continues from the vanity thru the roof, and exits the roof with 3" pipe. Let me know what you think HJ and others. Thanks
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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The 4" cleanout into the ""Y" is completely redundant and unnecessary. The tub "P" trap is too far from the vent to be code compliant. What do you mean by "they will tie into the 4" cleanout going to the main drain"?
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    A two inch p-trap is normally vented within five feet. That's the distance the inspectors are using. You may be able to shorten what you have by going more directly toward the tub.

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    DIY Senior Member Hammerlane's Avatar
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    Is it being suggested that it is OK to vent the toilet and tub via the sink?
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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    As long as the lav is done in 2", it can be used to wet vent the tub and the toilet, assuming it's on the same floor, as the one in the picture is.
    The trap arm length requirements still hold though.

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    DIY Senior Member Chad Schloss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    The 4" cleanout into the ""Y" is completely redundant and unnecessary. The tub "P" trap is too far from the vent to be code compliant. What do you mean by "they will tie into the 4" cleanout going to the main drain"?
    the cleanout on the wye is there because i am removing the other cleanout that goes into the wall. I planned on using a long turn 90 and making a left turn there and running 3" along the wall until I can pick up my washing machine drain on the main level and the kitchen sink as well.

    I thought by using 2" I could go up to 6 feet from the vent? From the end of the p trap I have a little over 5 feet until it turns, then another foot or so.

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member Chad Schloss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    A two inch p-trap is normally vented within five feet. That's the distance the inspectors are using.

    You may be able to shorten what you have by going more directly toward the tub.

    Ok, thanks Terry. So if I run the tub arm more at an angle, i might be able to shorten the length to the vent is what you are suggesting?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chad Schloss View Post
    Ok, thanks Terry. So if I run the tub arm more at an angle, i might be able to shorten the length to the vent is what you are suggesting?
    Pisture a square...top left corner being "A" , top right "B", bottom left "C", bottom right "D"..... heading clockwise from A to C, is it closer going A-B-C making a 90 or going A-C on a 45 angle.....

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    DIY Senior Member Chad Schloss's Avatar
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    well, to make sense out of your square, i had to draw it, lol. i think you meant going from a-b-d (by way of your lettering, since d is bottom right) i get that it is shorter going on a diag.. somewhere i read that it is best not to run at crazy angles if possible, so i tried to keep it 'neat' but it looks as if I am too long to the vent. also, i didn't know if it made a difference or not coming in before vs after the lav drain. I can re run it, not that big of deal. appreciate all the input. Hopefully it's not the worst you've seen, and at least i didn't try using an aav

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    Home Builder ckl111's Avatar
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    My only comment is that if you ever want to finish the basement, all those pipes are going to restrict your layout.

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    DIY Senior Member Chad Schloss's Avatar
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    after the 50k that i have in this repo house, i highly doubt that i will want to finish it. anyways, where would you decide to run them? thru the 2x8 joists? i wouldn't think of making swiss cheese out of an already light structure. this is at the rear left corner of the basement , which if walled off could be a utility room. it would amount to a space about 12X12, including the furnace. also, i have a higher than normal ceiling in there. I think it is a block or at least half a block higher than most basements of that era. (50's)

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    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckl111 View Post
    My only comment is that if you ever want to finish the basement, all those pipes are going to restrict your layout.
    How insightful, do you recommend he cuts the joists or what?

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    using standard fittings it would be somewhat difficult to run pipes at "crazy angles". He could have raised the piping, and there were ways to reroute it to make a better system.
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    Home Builder ckl111's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chad Schloss View Post
    after the 50k that i have in this repo house, i highly doubt that i will want to finish it. anyways, where would you decide to run them? thru the 2x8 joists? i wouldn't think of making swiss cheese out of an already light structure. this is at the rear left corner of the basement , which if walled off could be a utility room. it would amount to a space about 12X12, including the furnace. also, i have a higher than normal ceiling in there. I think it is a block or at least half a block higher than most basements of that era. (50's)
    No, definitely don't cut through any joists. My comments were only based on what I could see with the few shots you took. Raising the pipes may or may not be possible but based on the pictures you provided, it looked like the heat runs could have been raised with a few elbows and then the drains could have been raised to. Drains are not allowed to have dips in them but heat runs can, within reason. Like you said though, if it's only going to be inside the furnace room, why bother?

    This is just a general comment without the benefit of looking at your entire basement. What we usually do is create a floor layout and then try to run the heating and plumbing to maximize that layout. Electrical is usually last because the wires have the least amount of restrictions on how they can be run. This way, your floor plan dictates where the plumbing will go, not the other way around. If you know where the furnace room will be for instance or preferable build them first, pipes can hug the top of the walls or go in them and keep the ceilings clear. The goal is trying to keep the furnace room, if you will eventually create one, as small as possible so you will have more usable space for the principle rooms. Whether or not this matters also depends on if this is a 12 x 12 room in a 700 sq.ft. basement or a 3,000 sq.ft. basement.
    Last edited by ckl111; 04-19-2012 at 12:05 AM.

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