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Thread: Should I use a wood post in this bath situation?

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member MandK's Avatar
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    Question Should I use a wood post in this bath situation?

    Hi All,

    I'm converting a bath to a shower. (see attached pic). At the foot of the tub there is a short tiled wall. My idea is to run a wood post from tiled stem wall to the ceiling, add glass between the post and wall, then a shower rod in the other direction.

    I'm concerned about using a wood post in a wet environment. I suppose I could seal and poly the wood with several coats and be okay, but I'm not sure. Any opinions and help is appreciated. If wood will work, what kind of wood should I use?

    Thanks!!!

    MandK

    PS: I was thinking using an aluminum post, but don't like the look. A stained wood post will match my cabinets.
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  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    You could use a wooden post, but I think I'd prefer to cover it with an appropriate material (say cbu) and then waterproof it, then tile it. Double check with a glass installer, but if it was of sufficient thickness, support along the bottom and the one wall may be sufficient to hold it without the post.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member MandK's Avatar
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    tile is a good idea. I didn't think of that.

    The post is needed because I need something to attach the shower rod.

    PS: what is CBU?

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    cement backer unit...cbu, cement board. You can't tile directly to dimmensional wood. You could paint the cbu with something like RedGard or a sheet membrane like Kerdi. Don't use a pressure treated lumber unless it is KDAT (kiln dried after treatment). The stuff will twist like a pretzel when it dries - tile hates that! I'd probably just use a couple of 2x4's screwed and glued together. For more stability, you could make a box over that out of plywood (which is more stable than solid lumber), then the cbu, the the waterproofing, then the tile. This would allow you to make it any size you wanted.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    Terrible idea.

    You need to come up with a different finish, you're not going to match the grain of your cabinets here...

  6. #6
    General Contractor dx's Avatar
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    How do you propose to attach the wood post to the top of the tiled wall? And to the ceiling? Both attachments need to be structural.

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    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    Why do they need to be structural? You're not holding the roof up with this.

    For the ceiling (if attic above), it's quite simple...

    For the tile, you would need to know what is under/behind the tile and buy yourself a tile/glass bit...

    Either way, a wooden post is a bad idea.

  8. #8
    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    I doubt the wood post would see a lot of water.

    I might use a teak 3"x3" and install a couple of custom stainless steel knife slots. That would be easy enough.

    If you go the tile route I think you need to rebuild the pony wall and bring your framing floor to ceiling then cover and water proof.

    Another option would be to have the glass panel designed for a closet rod on the top right of it. With the glass pinned on the showers long wall and top of pony wall it would be strong enough by itself to support the shower rod. Call your glazer and he can help you.

    Then you will have a cleaner look and no wood. Unless you want wood in the shower!

    JW


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    I sort of thought you were going to rebuild that pony wall. The part that would see water is potentially the top of that wall, and wood sitting in it will not work.

    I like the idea of making the glass higher. You can get them to drill the holes required for a shower rod before they temper and polish it, then, if you choose the right rod, it would also give some rigidity of that side of the glass. Fully supported on the back wall and the top of the pony wall, with a support at the top should be plenty.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Junior Member MandK's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the opinions

    I think teak is a good idea as well and might look better than tile.....and less work :-)

    The knife slot connection is a better idea than what I had. I was thinking of installing a threaded anchor, drill a vertical hole in the bottom of the post and bolt it down thru a horizontal hole and then plug the hole. The top connection is easy: cut hole in ceiling, run post up thru attic, add 2X blocking between roof joists and thru-bolt the post to blocking.

  11. #11
    DIY Junior Member MandK's Avatar
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    JW

    I like your other option with no wood. I'll talk to my glazer.

  12. #12
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MandK View Post
    Thanks for all the opinions

    I think teak is a good idea as well and might look better than tile.....and less work :-)

    The knife slot connection is a better idea than what I had. I was thinking of installing a threaded anchor, drill a vertical hole in the bottom of the post and bolt it down thru a horizontal hole and then plug the hole. The top connection is easy: cut hole in ceiling, run post up thru attic, add 2X blocking between roof joists and thru-bolt the post to blocking.
    Okay, here is a guy that has done miles of wooden toilet partitions for high end hotels: you go to the cabinet shop and have them make you a hollow post from 4 pieces of teak [you are not going to find a 3x3 in teak unless you have a big wallet or an old battleship in your yard] Or cherry, or Redwood or White oak [think wine barrels]

    The connection is hidden inside the hole in the post. Put a block on the tile and set the slightly short post on it with some epoxy. Seals the end grain also - brush it in. Now at the top, make some nice trim and that secures the post without crawling into an attic. You can also use a taller block at the ceiling and smaller, lighter molding.

    If a solid post, a large dowel or metal circle can be the securing point on the bottom, into a drilled hole.

    Done it hundreds of times, and still secure after 20 years. Odd thing is, that there is no vandalism in these stalls. I can only guess that they look so good that the imbeciles actually respect the place for doing it in wood.
    Last edited by ballvalve; 03-17-2012 at 11:37 AM.

  13. #13
    DIY Junior Member MandK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    Okay, here is a guy that has done miles of wooden toilet partitions for high end hotels: you go to the cabinet shop and have them make you a hollow post from 4 pieces of teak [you are not going to find a 3x3 in teak unless you have a big wallet or an old battleship in your yard] Or cherry, or Redwood or White oak [think wine barrels]

    The connection is hidden inside the hole in the post. Put a block on the tile and set the slightly short post on it with some epoxy. Seals the end grain also - brush it in. Now at the top, make some nice trim and that secures the post without crawling into an attic. You can also use a taller block at the ceiling and smaller, lighter molding.

    If a solid post, a large dowel or metal circle can be the securing point on the bottom, into a drilled hole.

    Done it hundreds of times, and still secure after 20 years. Odd thing is, that there is no vandalism in these stalls. I can only guess that they look so good that the imbeciles actually respect the place for doing it in wood.
    Thanks for another great idea. I'm almost there with my final design.

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